Arts and Entertainment

Those who endured Williams’s recent X Factor performance need not fear: this brassy sequel to 2001’s big-band LP Swing When You’re Winning, is actually rather listenable. Not to say it’s great: he’s a karaoke kind of crooner and some of the covers here – such as “I Wanna Be Like You” with Olly Murs – should have remained the preserve of some celebrity charity ball.

Obituary: George Katsaros

Hey, when I die, what will they say?

Jonathan Glancey column

The discovery of Aristotle's Lyceum underneath a car park near the War Museum in central Athens has been greeted with a yawn by those for whom archaeology has become tarred with the Heritage brush. One commentator poo-poohing the fragments of building uncovered, called them "cultural dung". We have Aristotle's works (well, a fragment of them) and we live in his philosophical shadow, and that should be enough. Who cares what the Lyceum looked like? Let a thousand car parks bloom.

From Athens to Boeothia (by way of Atlantis)

John Kinsella published four volumes of poetry in Australia between 1991 and 1995, but The Undertow: New and Selected Poems (Arc, pounds 7.95) which draws on them, is his first published in England. In introducing him, Michael Hulse uses the distinction made by Kinsella's fellow-Australian Les Murray between the Athenian mode of urban sophistication and the Boeothian of rural plainness. Some such distinction is essential in characterising Kinsella, given the difference between his approachable country poems of parrots and tiger-moths, and the extremely resistant (the word "post- modernist" offers itself as a categorical escape-clause) sequence "Syzygy". The place to start is the third of the book's four sections "The Silo" where poems like "Rock Picking: Building Cairns" (memorably called "these rowdy cities") have some of the unforced reverie quality of Frost. The fourth section, of new poems, is again difficult. It is a curious kind of difficulty too; not the tight scroll which can be unrolled by intellectual application, but an energetic verbal tumult.

Warring factions divide Pasok

ANDREW GUMBEL

Papandreou's death proves pure politics

In Greece, people had begun to wonder if Andreas Papandreou would ever die. After all, his lungs, kidneys and other vital organs had weathered the kind of battering that would have long ago finished off a thousand ordinary mortals.

Ships tycoon Niarchos dies aged 86

Greek shipping tycoon Stavros Niarchos, one of the world's richest men and renowned for his rivalry with Aristotle Onassis, has died in Switzerland, Athens radio stations reported yesterday.

Lung operation for Papandreou

Athens - Doctors operated yesterday to remove fluid from Andreas Papandreou's lungs as the Greek Prime Minister's socialist party, Pasok, pondered a visit to ask for his resignation. A hospital statement described his condition as stable.

PM fighting for life

PM fighting for life

Greek PM hangs on

Greek PM hangs on

Naked ambition

Naked ambition

Revelations on a D string

Mark Pappenheim on the Greek performance of John Tavener's obsessive, surreal and shimmering Apocalypse

Athens lifts head above cloud of car-blown smog Can Athens point the way to smog-free cities?

ALL through this year's long, hot and choking summer, environment ministers and senior officials across the Continent were turning their eyes to this, western Europe's most polluted capital, in the hope of finding relief.

Ancient art, but what does it mean?

Classical scholars are all of a twitter over a reinterpretation of the events in the Parthenon frieze If our sons must die for Athens, why should our daughters not do so as well?

Greeks snub Papandreou

Athens - Greek Prime Minister Andreas Papandreou's handpicked candidate for mayor of Athens dealt the Socialist government a serious blow when he conceded defeat in yesterday's elections.

City depends on foreign shipowners, report warns

THE Government has been warned not to deter foreign shipowners, especially the Greeks, if it wants the City to keep its leading position in shipbroking.
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