Arts and Entertainment

Aloofness and taxes saw the King lose his head

Fifa charge South Korean player Jongwoo Park over political flag displayed at London 2012 Olympics

FIFA have charged a South Korea player after he displayed a flag with a political message during his side's bronze medal win over Japan in Cardiff.

Leading article: Time to right our Kenyan wrongs

So the case brought by three elderly survivors of Britain's brutal suppression of the Mau Mau rebellion in 1950s Kenya finally begins. The allegations of beatings, castration and rape to be heard by the High Court are horrific. And they are not unusual. The litany of brutality from the period – the forced labour camps, the torture, the murder – is one of the more shameful episodes of recent British history.

Palestinians anger Israel over Unesco role in Bethlehem

Unesco's World Heritage committee has approved a Palestinian bid to place the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem on its list of sites of World Heritage in Danger – a move seen by some nations as dangerously mixing politics and culture.

Falklands 'to determine own future'

The Falkland Islands must be allowed to determine their own future, Prime Minister David Cameron said today as he claimed a referendum on their sovereignty would end the debate over ownership once and for all. 

Falklanders to hold referendum

The Falkland Islands are to hold a referendum on their "political status" - hoping to bring an end to the continuing dispute with Argentina over the islands' sovereignty, their government said today.

Leading article: Nothing could have been more British

As it turned out, yesterday's Diamond Jubilee pageant was even more quintessentially British than anyone could have hoped for. Not because of the waving Royals and the vast crowds that turned out to see them. Not because of the seemingly endless sartorial permutations of the Union Flag. Not even because of all the limp sandwiches and bad cakes. All that was never in doubt. It was the weather that did us truly proud.

Members of Republic demonstrate near Tower Bridge, in central London, during the Diamond Jubilee celebrations

Anti-monarchy group 'Republic' stages Jubilee protest on the banks of the Thames

Protest by campaign group ahead of Queen's Diamond Jubilee river pageant

Tom Hodgkinson: My own little mutiny on the bunting

Unlike in 1977, when the Sex Pistols' "God Save the Queen" reached number two in the charts, there seem to be few republican voices prepared to stand out today. And however much you might like to resist it, everyone has gone crazy for bunting. It's everywhere (not least on the pages of the magazine you're holding in your hands).

Leading article: A right royal excuse for a good party

A Diamond Jubilee is a rare occasion indeed, both for the near-unprecedented length of the reign that it marks and – as is clear from the riot of celebrations, large and small, around the country – for the nationwide conviviality it has provoked. There is, it seems, nothing that brings our individualistic society together like a royal parade.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown: There is still a strong case for a republic

I admire and hugely like the singer Billy Bragg, that proud working-class hero. The last time we met, the Queen's Jubilee came up and also my fierce republicanism. Don't fret, said Billy, understand. Royalty is an integral part of British culture. Respect it, as you ask for your culture to be respected. I have never believed any tradition should be above criticism, just because it goes back a long way. But still, Billy, this time I tried, really tried. And then this week the excessive indulgence of spoilt royals, the oleaginousness and uninhibited ostentation got to me. Objections broke out, like hives. And quite honestly it is a relief after the suffocating restraint of the past months.

John Lydon had to rebuild his relationship with his parents after meningitis robbed him of his memory when he was seven

I lost my memory to meningitis, reveals Lydon

The former Sex Pistol says 'cruel and tortuous' illness left him unaware who his parents were

Abdulhadi Al-Khawaja: The human rights leader was jailed for life for trying to overthrow the government

Fears grow for Bahraini activist on hunger strike

There are growing fears for the life of Abdulhadi al-Khawaja, the jailed Bahraini human rights leader who has been on hunger strike for 78 days, as his family say they have been unable to contact him since Monday.

UAE recalls envoy to Iran over Gulf island row

The UAE has recalled its ambassador to Tehran for consultations after what the foreign minister said was a "flagrant violation" of its sovereignty by Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad who visited a Gulf island claimed by both countries since the 1970s.

Malaysia: Ceremony fit for a new king

Malaysia crowned its fourteenth King yesterday in an elaborate ceremony at the new National Palace in Kuala Lumpur.

Mourners pay tribute

Amol Rajan: Paying the price for an idiotic economic experiment

My girlfriend and I turned up for a romantic break in Athens last Wednesday evening, only to discover that Dimitris Christoulas had shot himself in front of parliament hours before. The 77-year-old pharmacist couldn't cope with the austerity imposed upon him by Greece's technocratic government. His suicide note confessed he couldn't bear to look his children in the eye any more. Massive demonstrations in the central Syntagma Square over the next four nights were his fellow citizens' response.

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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
10 best men's skincare products

Face it: 10 best men's skincare products

Oscar Quine cleanses, tones and moisturises to find skin-savers blokes will be proud to display on the bathroom shelf
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape
eBay's enduring appeal: Online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce retailer

eBay's enduring appeal

The online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce site
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
Artist Olafur Eliasson's latest large-scale works are inspired by the paintings of JMW Turner

Magic circles: Artist Olafur Eliasson

Eliasson's works will go alongside a new exhibition of JMW Turner at Tate Britain. He tells Jay Merrick why the paintings of his hero are ripe for reinvention
Josephine Dickinson: 'A cochlear implant helped me to discover a new world of sound'

Josephine Dickinson: 'How I discovered a new world of sound'

After going deaf as a child, musician and poet Josephine Dickinson made do with a hearing aid for five decades. Then she had a cochlear implant - and everything changed
Greggs Google fail: Was the bakery's response to its logo mishap a stroke of marketing genius?

Greggs gives lesson in crisis management

After a mishap with their logo, high street staple Greggs went viral this week. But, as Simon Usborne discovers, their social media response was anything but half baked
Matthew McConaughey has been singing the praises of bumbags (shame he doesn't know how to wear one)

Matthew McConaughey sings the praises of bumbags

Shame he doesn't know how to wear one. Harriet Walker explains the dos and don'ts of fanny packs
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

The midfielder returned to the Premier League after two years last weekend. The controversial character had much to discuss after his first game back
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan