Arts and Entertainment

Aloofness and taxes saw the King lose his head

Bahrain refuses Danish request to transfer hunger striker

Bahrain has rejected the Danish government's request to transfer a jailed activist who has spent two months on hunger strike to Denmark for emergency treatment, the kingdom's official news agency said.

Director of 'Shakespeare Must Die' Ing Kanjanavanit holds up a DVD the banned movie

Hubble bubble, Macbeth's in trouble as Thailand bans film

Film censors in Thailand have stepped in to ban a film based on William Shakespeare's Macbeth, claiming it could inflame political tensions.

A newly constitutional monarchy: Tupou at his coronation in 2008

King George Tupou V: Reformer who brought democracy to Tonga

King George Tupou V of Tonga was widely seen as a reformer who gave up most of his powers in order to usher in a more democratic era to the small South Pacific kingdom of 176 islands with a population of just over 105,000. Seen as an eccentric by many, Tupou loved Savile Row suits and military uniforms, and had a penchant for the dress of Lord Chelmsford's army in the Anglo-Zulu campaign, with spats, pith helmet and brass. He commanded the Tongan Defence Services, which saw service in Iraq and are now in Afghanistan.

Pakistani MPs demand end to US drone strikes

A Pakistani parliamentary commission yesterday demanded an end to drone attacks inside the country and an apology for deadly air strikes last year as part of a review of its near-severed relations with the US.

Tonga's King George Tupou V dies

Tonga's King George Tupou V, who gave up most of his powers to bring a more democratic government to his Pacific island nation, has died at a Hong Kong hospital.

Shelley was the daughter of famous radical intellectuals Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin

Mary Shelley: Frankenstein's mother

Like her most famous creation, she continues to be revived and reappraised, haunting the popular imagination, writes Holly Williams

Full transcript of Roger Waters' statement on the Falklands

"I recently gave a press conference in Santiago Chile, where I answered questions for over an hour.

Spain king's son-in-law appears in court 

The Spanish king's son-in-law was jeered by hundreds of protesters as he arrived at a court today to answer questions about suspected fraudulent deals.

King of the castle: Will Gompertz presented The Art of Monarchy

The Week In Radio: Put in the picture by a revealing royal appointment

The Art of Monarchy on Radio 4 began with a small black-and-white photograph. In it was a two-year-old girl standing in front of a large ivy-smothered house and staring daggers at the camera. In the background an elderly lady, whom you presumed to be her grandmother, looked benignly on. The date was 1927, the girl was Princess Elizabeth, and the photographer was her father Bertie, the future King George VI.

Album: Emeli Sande, Our Version of Events (Virgin)

There's plenty to admire about Emeli Sandé's debut album, but the most immediately striking thing, for me, is just how brazenly naked is the use of the "Funky Drummer" beat on the opening track and breakthrough single, "Heaven".

Obama admits use of drones in Pakistan

President Barack Obama has reignited the controversy over the CIA’s deployment of drones in Pakistan, admitting their use for the first time and insisting they were “precision strikes” against anti-American targets.

Mary Stuart, New Diorama, London

Faction Theatre Company won this year's Peter Brook/Equity Ensemble Award, a gong founded by the visionary Blanche Marvin, in recognition of the fact that ensembles -- the best training ground these post-rep days perhaps for young actors -- would benefit generally from having their profiles raised.

Jane Merrick: Mutualise the Royal Family? Why not?

Run the monarchy along John Lewis lines

Leading article: We play a risky political game in Saudi Arabia

With David Cameron in Saudi Arabia for his first visit since becoming Prime Minister, it is difficult to avoid the sense of the British Government once again holding its moral nose in the interests of our commercial and political influence.

Letters: Cameron's hypocrisy over Scotland

The hypocrisy of the Coalition government knows no bounds and the latest interference in Scottish affairs is a prime example. The London government is laying down the law to Scotland, dictating when it should hold a referendum on separation and at the same time reneging on promises to the English for a referendum on leaving the European Union.

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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent