Arts and Entertainment On the cutting edge: Johnny Vegas, from the Face of Satire exhibition at the BFI

On 26 February, Spitting Image will celebrate its 30 birthday. BBC Four will mark the occasion with a special episode of Arena which promises to tell the “vexed and frequently hilarious story” of the sketch show which ran for 21 series between 1984 and 1996 and marked a high point in British satire.

London's in-crowd

Simon Calder on the joys of capital living

SCREENWATCH

Film stars will see their make-up artists in a different light following the opening of a new exhibition in November. Tom Smith began his caricatures of Jack Nicholson (pictured below), Ingrid Bergman, Sean Connery, Bing Crosby and Laurence Olivier to while away gaps between takes, but his sketches have become a collection of the cream of Hollywood. Smith has worked for most of the major US studios, starting on David Lean's 1948 film, Oliver Twist. In 1992, he won a BAFTA special award for his work as a make-up artist; now he is using a more conventional medium, with an exhibition at the Museum of the Moving Image, South Bank, London, from 1 November.

Baadasssss hustlers collect their Hollywood dues

Blaxploitation comes to the NFT. But, says Tom Dewe Mathews, there's more to these films than music, fashion, cheap sets and cheaper dialogue

Film: Man of the Year, sham of the year

Dirk Shafer: Playgirl centrefold, adored by millions of women - and gay. By John Lyttle

Metropolitan Life: Next weekend...exercise your pedal power

In the Eighties we were advised to get on our bikes. In the Spring of 1994 a small group of cyclists did just that. Coming together under the banner "Critical Mass", 30 cyclists took to the streets of central London, blocking the roads in protest against the lack of facilities for cyclists. The idea captured the imagination of other fume-choked riders and Critical Mass became a monthly event. The ride now takes place on the last Friday of every month; in London, more than 1,000 riders participate; and most British cities now have their own event.

Film institute to open its archive to nation

Film buffs will able to watch individual screenings of classic films held by the British Film Institute archives in their local town if a lottery bid to the Millennium Fund is successful.

Wow! Where can I get a strait-jacket like that?

From Schiaparelli to Armani, Mae West to Richard Gere, the fashion and film industries used to cross-dress to the nines. Not any more.

Full Marx

This weekend a Marx retrospective will entirely fail to address questions of common ownership, and focus instead on the philosophical antics of Julius, Adolph, Leonard, Herbert and Milton. No new toff pop group they, but the insane comedians whose work has entertained and perplexed audiences for more than 60 years. Better known as Marx brothers Groucho, Harpo, Chico, Zeppo and Gummo, the surrealist siblings began work in vaudeville before scoring their first Broadway hit in 1924 with the excitingly titled I'll Say She Is! Four years later the brothers' anarchic humour hit the big screen, and although Gummo and Zeppo quickly disappeared from the family combo, Groucho, Chico and Harpo went on to become cinema legend.

Clock Lee's mastermix

Spike Lee graduated from film school in 1980's New York and his films display that decade's confidence and opportunism. From She's Gotta Have It! to Malcolm X (with Denzel Washington, left), the softly-spoken guy in baseball hat and specs has proved a master mixer of politics and entertainment, achieving big studio backing and a higher profile than any other black director. This weekend a retrospective at the NFT celebrates 10 years of his work and gives fans the chance to check his latest urban drama, Clockers.

Art and culture schlock

Hollywood created the superstars of art. All three of them. David Sweetman wonders why the establishment still sniffs at biographical populism

Film : CLINT EASTWOOD INTERVIEW National Film Theatre, London

Before Clint Eastwood arrived in person on Tuesday night, the audience was treated to three clips from his films: the scene in The Outlaw Josey Wales where Wales treats with the Indian chief ("Dyin' ain't so hard for men like you 'n' me. It's living that's hard"); the big shoot- out from Unforgiven ("You shot an unarmed man." "Well he shoulda' armed himself"); and the scene from In the Line of Fire where Eastwood's old secret service hand is chaffing his woman colleague about the tiny number of women agents ("Pure window-dressing").

TICKET OFFER: KAFKAESQUE CINEMA

Alienation is alive and kicking as Cinema of the Kafkaesque continues at the National Film Theatre. On show is the original version of The Fly (20 Aug), Steven Berkoff's Metamorphosis with Tim Roth, Franz Kafka's The Trial (21 Aug), Jan Svank-majer's Faust which combines live action with animation (24 Aug), Sam Fuller's classic Shock Corridor (25 Aug), Polanski's The Tenant (28 Aug), Orson Welles's version of The Trial (29 Aug) and Alice (30 Aug).

A reel nightmare

Kafka's influence on trial at the NFT

Satanism rampant at NFT

If you're worried about what to do with the kids this summer, the National Film Theatre has a few ideas to offer you - for instance, why not have them pierced with skewers and flayed alive by vicious sadists from another dimension? Alternatively, if your tastes are more conservative, you can just leave them to be possessed by the evil spirits of dead servants. Yes, Fantasm 95, this year's annual celebration of science fiction, fantasy and horror, is running all this month, and taking over the NFT completely for this weekend (including Dr Jekyll and Ms Hyde, right). At the heart of the festival (the still pulsating heart, you assume, ripped raw and bloody from its owner's living body) are two seasons paying tribute to the work of British masters of the horror genre. A homage to Freddie Francis, cameraman and director (The Ghoul, Legend of the Werewolf), reaches a climax on Sunday with a screening of The Innocents, Jack Clayton's satisfyingly low-key 1961 adaptation of The Turn of the Screw, in which Francis's remarkable camerawork plays a leading role; that's followed by a Guardian interview with Francis.

NFT memberships to be won

Celluloid Jukebox, the National Film Theatre's huge season celebrating popular music and the movies, continues throughout July with golden oldies like Frank Tashlin's The Girl Can't Help It (5 July 8.45), Louis Malle's Lift to the Scaffold (20 July 8.40 and 23 July 8.40), Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo (19 July 7.30) and High School Confidential (30 July 8.40), and more recent work like Alan Parker's The Commitments, pictured above (2 July 8.40), Saturday Night Fever (20 July 6.15), Rock 'n' Roll High School (3 July 8.45) and Barry Levinson's Jimmy Hollywood (13 July 8.45).
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