News

JPMorgan chief says virtual currency faces major regulatory hurdles

Businessman bailed over £115m Ponzi scam

A businessman appeared in court today accused of masterminding a sprawling £115 million scam that claimed a series of high-profile victims.

Ed Balls: Government cuts economically unsafe

Ed Balls today warned that the Government's deficit reduction plan is "economically unsafe" as he stepped up his campaign for the Labour leadership.

Businessman accused of £115m 'ponzi' scam

A businessman was accused today of masterminding a sprawling £115 million scam that claimed a series of high-profile victims.

The ice-cream heir who saw two fortunes melt away

John Robbins rejected his inheritance and then lost millions to Madoff. But it made him a better person, he tells Guy Adams

Matthew Norman: Liz Jones, poster girl for Big Society

In the most startling reinvention this industry has known in decades, the Daily Mail shrugs off its reactionary stereotype to host an intriguingly hybrid social experiment. The pit canary here is the magnificently prolific Liz Jones, who single-handedly spearheads two major breakthroughs – the first recorded case of Mr Cameron's Big Society in action, and the inaugural deployment of a newspaper column as care in the community. As many of you will know, Liz likes to keep the readership minutely informed of life, latterly dwelling on the £150,000 debt she says has depressed her even more than her rejection by the Somerset neighbours who took mystifying umbrage at being depicted as toothless imbeciles. "Being in debt," wrote Liz, "is worse than anything I have experienced." Given what Liz has experienced – and short of alien abduction, bless her, what has she not? – that's going some. "When you have no money people assume it's because you are lazy or profligate." The rank injustice. The very idea that a woman who spent £26,000 on a bat sanctuary, and lavishes more than £1,000 a year on mineral water, tends towards the wasteful!

Finance watchdogs looked at porn as banks collapsed

The heated atmosphere inside the Securities Exchange Commission, the agency charged with monitoring the US financial industry, may have had less to do recently with turmoil in the markets and more with ructions between the sheets, on account of senior staffers spending their days sampling internet pornography instead of Wall Street data.

Sean O'Grady: Three-party politics is here to stay

Tories could usefully stop claiming that a hung parliament - already priced in by the markets - or a proportional voting system would lead to a sterling crisis

Man who blew Madoff whistle meets SFO

The man who exposed the massive Ponzi scheme fears 'political' issues are blocking justice in London

US regulators suspected Stanford in 1997

American regulators had concluded in 1997 that Allen Stanford, the sports-mad financier who bankrolled English cricket, was probably a fraudster, but they didn't charge him for 12 more years because it was too complicated a case.

Computer programmers indicted in Bernard Madoff fraud

Two former employees accused of helping fraudulent Wall Street financier Bernard Madoff programme an old computer to generate false records have been indicted.

Business Diary: Murdoch silenced by autocue malfunction

It's not often that Rupert Murdoch is lost for words, but that's what happened during his keynote speech at an Abu Dhabi media summit yesterday when the autocue broke down. In the end, an aide had to dig out a hard copy of the speech, enabling the great man to carry on.

Last Night's Television: The Day the Immigrants Left, BBC1<br />Damages, BBC1

"It's like I'm a foreigner in me own country," complained Terry at the beginning of The Day the Immigrants Left. In truth, Terry wasn't nearly enough like a foreigner. He didn't have a job, for one thing, unlike most of the real foreigners in the area. And the programme he was taking part in was about to demonstrate that he was going to have to get a lot more foreign if he wanted to get and keep one. The pitch was simple. Several Wisbech employers had been persuaded to give some of their immigrant workforce a few days off and to replace them with unemployed locals. Is it that they can't get the jobs because overseas workers are undercutting them? Or is it that they just don't do the jobs as well?

TV schedules: A crazy clash of the titans

Fans of Mad Men and Damages will be left furious by the BBC's decision to let the two hit shows overlap, says Gerard Gilbert

Glenn Close - Lock up your pets, she's back

Nobody plays a manipulative monster as well as Glenn Close. As she returns to our screens in a welcome third season of the legal drama Damages, Gerard Gilbert celebrates the star's formidable froideur

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown: Still no hope of common sense in the war against anti-Semitism

These defenders to the end of all Israeli actions knowingly mix politics and race
Arts and Entertainment
books
Voices
Caustic she may be, but Joan Rivers is a feminist hero, whether she likes it or not
voicesShe's an inspiration, whether she likes it or not, says Ellen E Jones
Arts and Entertainment
The Doctor and the Dalek meet
tvReview: Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Sport
Diego Costa
footballEverton 3 Chelsea 6: Diego Costa double has manager purring
Life and Style
3D printed bump keys can access almost any lock
techSoftware needs photo of lock and not much more
Arts and Entertainment
The 'three chords and the truth gal' performing at the Cornbury Music Festival, Oxford, earlier this summer
music... so how did she become country music's hottest new star?
Life and Style
The spy mistress-general: A lecturer in nutritional therapy in her modern life, Heather Rosa favours a Byzantine look topped off with a squid and a schooner
fashionEurope's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln
News
Dr Alice Roberts in front of a
peopleAlice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Star turns: Montacute House
tv
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor
She's dark, sarcastic, and bashes life in Nowheresville ... so how did Kacey Musgraves become country music's hottest new star?

Kacey Musgraves: Nashville's hottest new star

The singer has two Grammys for her first album under her belt and her celebrity fans include Willie Nelson, Ryan Adams and Katy Perry
American soldier-poet Brian Turner reveals the enduring turmoil that inspired his memoir

Soldier-poet Brian Turner on his new memoir

James Kidd meets the prize-winning writer, whose new memoir takes him back to the bloody battles he fought in Iraq
Aston Villa vs Hull match preview: Villa were not surprised that Ron Vlaar was a World Cup star

Villa were not surprised that Vlaar was a World Cup star

Andi Weimann reveals just how good his Dutch teammate really is
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef ekes out his holiday in Italy with divine, simple salads

Bill Granger's simple Italian salads

Our chef presents his own version of Italian dishes, taking in the flavours and produce that inspired him while he was in the country
The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

If supporters begin to close bank accounts, switch broadband suppliers or shun satellite sales, their voices will be heard. It’s time for revolution