Competitions

Top-price ticket and a two-course meal for £45

Theatre is saved by bistro deal

THE Everyman Theatre in Liverpool, which closed three months ago, is to reopen next month with an award-winning production of King Lear.

Food and Drink: Deep hankering for something French: Emily Green surveys some of the bistros and restaurants that take their cues - not always successfully - from counterparts in France

THE OPENING this week of the Tate Gallery exhibition, Paris Post War: Art and Existentialism 1945-55, co-sponsored by the Independent and the French Embassy, touches a deep hankering in these isles for French verve. It is especially acute among restaurateurs, such as Sir Terence Conran, who recently reopened Quaglino's in St James's in an extravagant bow to the great brasseries of Paris, particularly Brasserie Lipp.

Food and Drink: Memories to make the mouth water: It's the time of the year when awards are dished out; Emily Green tickles her taste buds to recall some of her favourite pubs, restaurants, bistros and brasseries of 1992

THIS IS not a week for complaining (well, not much) nor for dwelling on delicious little faults (well, maybe a few), and certainly not one for cold-blooded autopsies. Rather, we present a That- Was-The-Year-That-Was bumper edition of the best restaurants reviewed on these pages in 1992. Many were newly opened; some merely new to me; and one neither (I returned to see whether it was as good as I thought it was; it was).

Column Eight: Brummie brasserie on menu

BIRMINGHAM's bid to shed its tag as a cultural wasteland may be about to get a shot in the arm. Richard Shepherd, joint owner with Michael Caine of Langan's Brasserie in London, has been touring the provinces for a site on which to spend pounds 1m on a new eaterie. It seems Britain's unfashionable second city is top of his menu, though whether it will attract the celebrity clientele that made his Piccadilly brasserie so famous is doubtful. But Mr Shepherd is ever hopeful. 'Birmingham is a changed city; it really is,' he says.

On the piste with rose and Beaujolais

THERE was a boules competition in Bath last year, organised by such deeply serious sports organisations as the Great Western Wine Company and Le Beaujolais restaurant. The tournament filled Queen Square one sunny Sunday with tents and flags, as if jousting had magically returned to the world, and then as suddenly vanished back to Fairyland. For months afterwards, I found myself talking familiarly to complete strangers in Bath, remembering only afterwards that the one thing we had in common was that we had once hurled small cannon balls against each other.
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