ROWING Oxford look to future

ROWING

Light Blues victorious at a stroke

The 14lst Boat Race: A breeze for Cambridge as they row to a hat- trick and deny Topolski a dream return

centrepiece: Carter's classics

The family Carter's horses have been galloping a long while. Since 1895 they have made their rounds, never missing a season and, to mark their centenary, John Carter (left) has been investing heavily on their backs.

Hogarth's Grave in Chiswick

site unseen

London: the step-by-step guide Michael Leapman takes a brisk riverside walk around Chiswick

The Palladian style of architecture, all cool classicism and elegant symmetry, is celebrated in an exhibition that opened at the Royal Academy this month. One of the finest examples of the style is Chiswick House, built for Lord Burlington in 1729. Today's route reaches its climax there, after some brisk riverside walking.

A temple to the spirit of Rome

Richard Hewlings visits two exhibitions on Lord Burlington, who used an cient architecture as a response to moral problems

Little Lord Fauntleroy: he's back and not just on the telly Some parents have fallen for velvet and lace

THE look is unmistakeable, as is the note of scorn when the name is pronounced. The small boy in the black velvet Van Dyke suit, knickerbockers, extravagant collar and cuffs can only be . . . Little Lord Fauntleroy.

Food & Drink:: Bare-bones chic in Smithfield: Looks good enough to eat in? Emily Green samples two new restaurants where the decor seems as important as the food

St John, a vast and handsome new restaurant near Smithfield Market, is just the refectory for London's fashion-conscious trenchermen. It is bare-bones chic, yet little on the menu would have surprised that great British journalist Daniel Defoe. And much would have pleased him: roast bone marrow and parsley salad, lamb and barley stew, roast guinea fowl and salted cabbage.

Landmarks: Chiswick Park Tube Station

My chosen building is Chiswick Park Tube, one of the famous set of Thirties underground stations designed by Charles Holden. It was rebuilt from the old station in 1933 using a mixture of materials, incorporating the traditional and the very modern. Brick was used because tube trains were famous for staining their buildings with brown dust which came off the brakes.

Hockey: Pickett attacks his problem

HAVANT'S quest for a fourth title in five years is looking anything but easy. Fortunately, their manager, Chris Pickett, is not one to panic, writes Bill Colwill.

Swan-song for the big red bus: London's pride: The Routemaster, beautiful, efficient and simple to maintain, is 40 years old this week. But age and galloping privatisation mean its days are numbered. Jonathan Glancey reports

The Routemaster, still the world's finest double-deck bus, is 40 years old. It is one of the few surviving links with those unsung men and women who once dreamed of a public transport system that was efficient, integrated and beautiful: a work of civic art shaped equally for the toff in Sloane Street, the char working the City Road and everyone else from Tooting to Totteridge.

A view from abroad: Scott Capurro Comedian

I like Soho, Old Compton St and all those cafes. But the only part I really love about the London gay scene is the clubs. I'm going to the Fridge in Brixton again tonight and I went to a place in Kings Cross last night called the Bell. I guess the scene in London is a lot like the States now. I just wish the bars were open later. Sometimes I don't want to go to a club, I just want to have a drink, late at night, with some friends. Its so annoying.

Noble dream flows after 250 years

To the aristocrat who dreamed it up, the waterfall was to be a glorious cascade and centrepiece of his ornate west London garden. To the locals it was known as Lord Burlington's Piddle because it failed to gush.

Two hunted after pounds 400 knife raid

Two masked men are being sought by police after a robbery at the Pizza Hut on Chiswick High Road on Tuesday. They threatened the manager with a knife, and forced him to open the safe before escaping with pounds 400.

Mystery beats stalks Chiswick

City dwellers who take comfort from the knowledge that wild beasts are restricted to windswept moors are in for a shock. A mysterious creature - known locally as the Beast of Chiswick - has been skulking through gardens in the early hours, leaving a trail of savaged animals.
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Independent Travel
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3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
Homeless Veterans campaign: Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after £300,000 gift from Lloyds Bank

Homeless Veterans campaign

Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after huge gift from Lloyds Bank
Flight MH370 a year on: Lost without a trace – but the search goes on

Lost without a trace

But, a year on, the search continues for Flight MH370
Germany's spymasters left red-faced after thieves break into brand new secret service HQ and steal taps

Germany's spy HQ springs a leak

Thieves break into new €1.5bn complex... to steal taps
International Women's Day 2015: Celebrating the whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Simone de Beauvoir's seminal feminist polemic, 'The Second Sex', has been published in short-form for International Women's Day
Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Why would I want to employ someone I’d be happy to have as my boss, asks Simon Kelner
Confessions of a planespotter: With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent

Confessions of a planespotter

With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent. Sam Masters explains the appeal
Russia's gulag museum 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities

Russia's gulag museum

Ministry of Culture-run site 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities
The big fresh food con: Alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay

The big fresh food con

Joanna Blythman reveals the alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay
Virginia Ironside was my landlady: What is it like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7?

Virginia Ironside was my landlady

Tim Willis reveals what it's like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7
Paris Fashion Week 2015: The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp

Paris Fashion Week 2015

The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp
8 best workout DVDs

8 best workout DVDs

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Paul Scholes column: I don't believe Jonny Evans was spitting at Papiss Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible

Paul Scholes column

I don't believe Evans was spitting at Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible
Miguel Layun interview: From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

Miguel Layun is a star in Mexico where he was criticised for leaving to join Watford. But he says he sees the bigger picture
Frank Warren column: Amir Khan ready to meet winner of Floyd Mayweather v Manny Pacquiao

Khan ready to meet winner of Mayweather v Pacquiao

The Bolton fighter is unlikely to take on Kell Brook with two superstar opponents on the horizon, says Frank Warren
War with Isis: Iraq's government fights to win back Tikrit from militants - but then what?

Baghdad fights to win back Tikrit from Isis – but then what?

Patrick Cockburn reports from Kirkuk on a conflict which sectarianism has made intractable