ROWING Oxford look to future

ROWING

Light Blues victorious at a stroke

The 14lst Boat Race: A breeze for Cambridge as they row to a hat- trick and deny Topolski a dream return

centrepiece: Carter's classics

The family Carter's horses have been galloping a long while. Since 1895 they have made their rounds, never missing a season and, to mark their centenary, John Carter (left) has been investing heavily on their backs.

Hogarth's Grave in Chiswick

site unseen

London: the step-by-step guide Michael Leapman takes a brisk riverside walk around Chiswick

The Palladian style of architecture, all cool classicism and elegant symmetry, is celebrated in an exhibition that opened at the Royal Academy this month. One of the finest examples of the style is Chiswick House, built for Lord Burlington in 1729. Today's route reaches its climax there, after some brisk riverside walking.

A temple to the spirit of Rome

Richard Hewlings visits two exhibitions on Lord Burlington, who used an cient architecture as a response to moral problems

Little Lord Fauntleroy: he's back and not just on the telly Some parents have fallen for velvet and lace

THE look is unmistakeable, as is the note of scorn when the name is pronounced. The small boy in the black velvet Van Dyke suit, knickerbockers, extravagant collar and cuffs can only be . . . Little Lord Fauntleroy.

Food & Drink:: Bare-bones chic in Smithfield: Looks good enough to eat in? Emily Green samples two new restaurants where the decor seems as important as the food

St John, a vast and handsome new restaurant near Smithfield Market, is just the refectory for London's fashion-conscious trenchermen. It is bare-bones chic, yet little on the menu would have surprised that great British journalist Daniel Defoe. And much would have pleased him: roast bone marrow and parsley salad, lamb and barley stew, roast guinea fowl and salted cabbage.

Landmarks: Chiswick Park Tube Station

My chosen building is Chiswick Park Tube, one of the famous set of Thirties underground stations designed by Charles Holden. It was rebuilt from the old station in 1933 using a mixture of materials, incorporating the traditional and the very modern. Brick was used because tube trains were famous for staining their buildings with brown dust which came off the brakes.

Hockey: Pickett attacks his problem

HAVANT'S quest for a fourth title in five years is looking anything but easy. Fortunately, their manager, Chris Pickett, is not one to panic, writes Bill Colwill.

Swan-song for the big red bus: London's pride: The Routemaster, beautiful, efficient and simple to maintain, is 40 years old this week. But age and galloping privatisation mean its days are numbered. Jonathan Glancey reports

The Routemaster, still the world's finest double-deck bus, is 40 years old. It is one of the few surviving links with those unsung men and women who once dreamed of a public transport system that was efficient, integrated and beautiful: a work of civic art shaped equally for the toff in Sloane Street, the char working the City Road and everyone else from Tooting to Totteridge.

A view from abroad: Scott Capurro Comedian

I like Soho, Old Compton St and all those cafes. But the only part I really love about the London gay scene is the clubs. I'm going to the Fridge in Brixton again tonight and I went to a place in Kings Cross last night called the Bell. I guess the scene in London is a lot like the States now. I just wish the bars were open later. Sometimes I don't want to go to a club, I just want to have a drink, late at night, with some friends. Its so annoying.

Noble dream flows after 250 years

To the aristocrat who dreamed it up, the waterfall was to be a glorious cascade and centrepiece of his ornate west London garden. To the locals it was known as Lord Burlington's Piddle because it failed to gush.

Two hunted after pounds 400 knife raid

Two masked men are being sought by police after a robbery at the Pizza Hut on Chiswick High Road on Tuesday. They threatened the manager with a knife, and forced him to open the safe before escaping with pounds 400.

Mystery beats stalks Chiswick

City dwellers who take comfort from the knowledge that wild beasts are restricted to windswept moors are in for a shock. A mysterious creature - known locally as the Beast of Chiswick - has been skulking through gardens in the early hours, leaving a trail of savaged animals.
News
The Banksy image in Folkestone before it was vandalised
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Life and Style
tech

Sales of the tablet are set to fall again, say analysts

Sport
football West Brom vs Man Utd match report: Blind grabs point, but away form a problem for Van Gaal
Arts and Entertainment
Gotham is coming to UK shores this autumn
tvGotham, episode 2, review
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Arts and Entertainment
Bloom Time: Mira Sorvino
tvMira Sorvino on leaving movie roles for 'The Intruders'
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First woman: Valentina Tereshkova
peopleNASA guinea pig Kate Greene thinks it might fly
News
Brian Harvey turned up at Downing Street today demanding to speak to the Prime Minister
news

Met Police confirm there was a 'minor disturbance' and that no-one was arrested

Arts and Entertainment
George Lucas poses with a group of Star Wars-inspired Disney characters at Disney's Hollywood Studios in 2010
films

George Lucas criticises the major Hollywood film studios

Voices
Chris Grayling, Justice Secretary: 'There are pressures which we are facing but there is not a crisis'
voices

Does Chris Grayling realise what a vague concept he is dealing with?

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Vietnam & Cambodia
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India & Nepal
Japan
Berlin, Dresden, Meissen & Colditz
Prices correct as of 17 October 2014
Two super-sized ships have cruised into British waters, but how big can these behemoths get?

Super-sized ships: How big can they get?

Two of the largest vessels in the world cruised into UK waters last week
British doctors on brink of 'cure' for paralysis with spinal cord treatment

British doctors on brink of cure for paralysis

Sufferers can now be offered the possibility of cure thanks to a revolutionary implant of regenerative cells
Ranked seventh in world’s best tourist cities - not London, or Edinburgh, but Salisbury

Salisbury ranked seventh in world’s best tourist cities

The city is home to one of the four surviving copies of the Magna Carta, along with the world’s oldest mechanical clock
Let's talk about loss

We need to talk about loss

Secrecy and silence surround stillbirth
Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Women may be better suited to space travel than men are
Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

New book on Ian Curtis sheds fresh light on the life of the late singer

'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Many of us Brits still disapprove of conspicuous consumption – it's the way we were raised, says DJ Taylor
Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album