Life and Style

The Z1 Compact offers identical hardware to the S1, but shrinks the screen from 5 inches to 4.3 - David Phelan gives us the first full UK review

£5,000 'Oled' TVs herald entertainment revolution

Analysts predict stampede for latest generation of screens, just 3mm thick

Apple introduces new Mac desktop computers

Apple has refreshed its line of Mac desktop computers, adding stronger capabilities and nudging some prices lower as consumer spending feels the pinch of the recession.

'World's thinnest television' released

Tomorrow will see the launch of the Sony BRAVIA ZX1, a new LCD television with a HD display less then a centimetre in depth. The display, which is as slim as a CD case, is being claimed by its manufacturers to be the thinnest on any production television set.

How to display your photographs

Forget albums – there are better ways to show off snaps. By Kate Watson-Smyth

Darts: Taylor breaks own record on way to 14th world title

Phil Taylor broke his own record for a major final when producing a brilliant display to hammer Raymond van Barneveld 7-1 in the World Darts Championship and take his 14th world title in London last night.

Terence Blacker: Ed Stourton and the new brutalism

Unkind, idiotic mindgames now surround the redundancy process

<a href="http://martinking.livejournal.com/1203.html">Martin King: With a little help from the gizmo</a>

OK, I know part of the aim to enter the London Marathon was to get off my backside, leave the computer screens behind and hit the road. But all those years with the geeks left me feeling the need for a bit of techie assistance.

Apple announcement: MacBook RAM-ifications

Watching the new MacBooks being introduced , the first thing that struck me was how subdued the assembled viewers were.



<a href="http://blogs.independent.co.uk/independent/2008/09/cyberclinic-ign.html">Cyberclinic: Ignore popups at your peril</a>

Genuine warning boxes pop up on our computer screens for a good reason. They interrupt the scintillating on-screen action to tell us that we should probably read the contents of the warning box and consider the various options (usually yes, no or cancel) before we proceed any further with our task.

From desktop to dustbin: The evolution of the mouse

Technological innovations are changing the way we use computers. So, asks Simon Usborne, does this mean the end for the mouse?

Oval courtroom gets emergency refit

The Sir John Major Room overlooking the green bowl of the Oval Cricket Ground was built for corporate entertainment. Yesterday, it opened as the arena for a grand-scale investigation into alleged institutional incompetence – and a spot of redecorating.

Bored and unhappy graduates?

Nearly 50 per cent of recent science and maths graduates are unhappy because they rarely or never use their science and maths skills in their jobs, according to a recent survey conducted by the Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA).

Jobs faces lawsuit over colourful claims

Steve Jobs, the chief executive of Apple, has been taken to task for making allegedly misleading claims in one of his high-profile product launches, and faces the prospect of being called to defend himself in a California court.

Cave sculptures go on display for first time in 15,000 years

Prehistoric cave sculptures never seen by the public will be revealed today thanks to the most advanced, computerised techniques of laser-copying and visual display.

Hedda Gabler, Barbican, London

A cool and too calculating heroine
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people Emma Watson addresses celebrity nude photo leak
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Katie Hopkins appearing on 'This Morning' after she purposefully put on 4 stone.
peopleKatie Hopkins breaks down in tears over weight gain challenge
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Boris Johnson may be manoeuvring to succeed David Cameron
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peopleHis band Survivor was due to resume touring this month
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people'It can last and it's terrifying'
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In this photo illustration a school student eats a hamburger as part of his lunch which was brought from a fast food shop near his school, on October 5, 2005 in London, England. The British government has announced plans to remove junk food from school lunches. From September 2006, food that is high in fat, sugar or salt will be banned from meals and removed from vending machines in schools across England. The move comes in response to a campaign by celebrity TV chef Jamie Oliver to improve school meals.
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fashionModel of the moment shoots for first time with catwalk veteran
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fashionPart of 'best-selling' Demeter scent range
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes': US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food served at diplomatic dinners

'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes'

US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food
Radio Times female powerlist: A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

Inside the Radio Times female powerlist
Endgame: James Frey's literary treasure hunt

James Frey's literary treasure hunt

Riddling trilogy could net you $3m
Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

What David Sedaris learnt about the world from his fitness tracker
Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Second-holiest site in Islam attracts millions of pilgrims each year
Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering