News Metropolitan Police of officers entering a property in Marcella Road, SW9, as police targeted a notorious gang in a series of early morning raids across the UK

Senior members of one of the country’s most notorious gangs have been arrested after expanding their drug-dealing operations outside of their south London stronghold to target lucrative new markets, police said yesterday.

The Knack: How to Make a Room Look Bigger

CONTRAST IS the key. Use horizontal bands of different colours - keep them quite broad, having about five up a wall. It plays with your sense of perspective and really does make it feel as if the space has got much bigger. The more contrast there is between the stripes the more efficient the effect; white and black are the best because that really does trick your eye, but of course it's up to people whether they can live with that.

French poised for Allied Carpets bid

ALLIED CARPETS, the struggling retailer at the centre of three bid approaches, is expected to recommend an offer from Tapis Saint-Maclou, a privately owned French company, early next week.

DARK SIDE OF THE ROOM

"If you're having curtains, don't have muslin, fringing, swags or tie-backs," advises Nigel Harris, interior designer. "Think big geometric prints like those in the late Sixties: Casa Pupo, Pucci, Bridget Riley. Or plain solid colour with bold weaves or quilting can look fantastic. In either case let them hang free and simple."

Back for another curtain call

Floaty muslin and minimalist blinds are being usurped by heavier, traditional window fabrics. Lights out, says ANNALISA BARBIERI

Arts: A little more than you really wanted to see?

A show by six documentary photographers celebrates the intimacy of voyeurism.

The Sketch: Redwood's back to see Prescott completely off the rails as

"BYE BYE, bye bye," shouted Labour backbenchers as Gillian Shephard rose to speak during environment questions. The tone was one of reflective derision, but there wasn't much sting since Mrs Shephard has known she was going for months and acknowledged that she was on "borrowed time" with an attractive levity of spirit.

Theatre: lift99

Voyeurs with a penchant for hanging out in department stores should be very happy about forthcoming delights in the London International Festival of Theatre (Lift99). If you pop down to Arding and Hobbs Department Store in Clapham, you will see the Australian Urban Dream Capsule (left), featuring four guys "living" in the display windows for two weeks, 24 hours a day with - guess what? - no curtains. The 14 other events include Concierto Barroco - a picaresque stage-version of the novel of Venezuelan magical-realist writer Alejo Carpentier, and Ubu - a collaboration between South African artist William Kentridge and the Handspring Puppet Company which bases itself on the explosive information supplied to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Racing: Prescott makes a Dash for a Classic

YOUNG FAMILIES have been rushing past the gates of Heath House in Newmarket this week following news of the great master's swift deterioration.

The Big Picture: The tale of a royal hair-raiser

ELIZABETH (15) DIRECTOR: SHEKHAR KAPUR 120 MINS STARRING CATE BLANCHETT, RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH, CHRISTOPHER ECCLESTON

McGough: poet and plagiarist?

Jenny Lewis was pleased when Roger McGough praised her poem at a masterclass. Then she discovered he had borrowed her idea.

Albee's back; and bleak and oblique as ever

The Play about the Baby Almeida Hamlet Barbican Full Gallop Hampstead

Property: It's curtains for burglars

AUGUST is peak burglary season. Four out of five break-ins take place when a house or flat is empty and opportunists will be looking for signs that the owners are on holiday.

Design: It has got to be red in bed

Design Lines

Fashion: Shop to shock

Rosanna de Lisle visits Moschino's European flagship store in London's West End - and finds a fitting tribute to the eccentric designer

Property: How to draw the buyers in

First impressions count when you're selling your property, and your windows on the world count most.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine