News Former Enron chief executive Jeffrey Skilling could be released before the end of the decade

Jeffrey Skilling, the ex-Enron chief executive who was sent to prison in 2006 after being convicted for his role in the energy giant’s collapse, could be freed by the end of the decade after a US judge cut his sentence from 24 to 14 years.

I Am The Wind, Young Vic, London<br/>Little Eyolf, Jermyn Street, London<br/>The City Madam, Swan, Stratford

One Norwegian's minimalism for half-wits, Ibsen taken too far, and a satirical 17th-century romp

Heads Up: The Merchant of Venice

Happy birthday, RSC &ndash; and here's your pound of flash

Enron CEO Skilling is denied fresh trial

the fraud convictions of Jeffrey Skilling, chief executive of the collapsed energy giant Enron, were based on overwhelming evidence and "harmless" errors by the trial judge do not warrant giving him a new trial, an appeals court has decided.

A Day That Shook The World: Collapse of Enron

On 23 October 2006, the former chief executive of American energy giant Enron was jailed for massive fraud.

Margareta Pagano: Attack-dog Blanchflower needs leashing

The TV and radio soundbites are too short to give the proper context to Professor David Blanchflower's inflammatory outpourings against Mervyn King, the Governor of the Bank of England. But considering the extreme nature of Blanchflower's criticism, calling for King's head after his comments about David Cameron and George Osborne were disclosed on WikiLeaks, it's important that we should put his comments into the right framework.

All the Globe's a stage &ndash; even for women writers

As Shakespeare's theatre opens its doors today for the first time to a play by a female writer, Rachel Shields reports on a wider theatrical revolution

David Mitchell: 'Readers enable me to continue to do what I love. Prizes won't do that for you'

David Mitchell attracts both deep popular affection and critical awe. In Edinburgh, Arifa Akbar talks to him as the Booker race looms

Earthquakes in London, National Theatre: Cottesloe, London

With plays such as My Child and Cock, Mike Bartlett has made his mark as a laser-sharp minimalist. Now he's been encouraged to "think big", as they say, in Earthquakes in London, a sprawling, three-and-a-quarter-hour, five-act epic that, while set mostly in the present, spans the late Sixties and 2525 as it examines how life is lived under the threat of climate change and impending catastrophe.

Oversight law survives Supreme Court battle

Sarbanes-Oxley, the controversial American corporate governance law introduced after the collapse of the energy giant Enron, has survived a major legal challenge at the US Supreme Court.

Conrad Black given hope of early release

The imprisoned press baron Conrad Black has been given a sliver of hope in his long and belligerent campaign to clear his name, after the US Supreme Court ruled that the jury that convicted him of fraud were given faulty instructions.

Business Diary: Enron is still mining rich seam

Enron the play may have tanked on its New York outing, but it is still attracting sell-out audiences in London's West End. Spotted at a showing over the bank holiday weekend: Anil Agarwal, of Vedanta Resources – or at least someone who bears an uncanny resemblance to the mining company's top man. Vedanta has its own crosses to bear, reputationally-speaking, so it must have been comforting for Agarwal to watch a company that is in a league of its own on that score.

Theatre with lyrics hits a high note

Playwrights are finally embracing musicals and enhancing their work with song. It's a good mix, says Alice Jones

Mary Dejevsky: The moment I turned into Gillian Duffy

It's shaming, I know. But within minutes of arriving at the dealership to deliver the car for a routine service, I had a Gillian Duffy moment.

What the Dog Saw, By Malcolm Gladwell

If Malcolm Gladwell cooks up high-grade fast-food for the intellect, at least he always knows how to present it with spice and relish.

Enron play flops in US as art imitates life

It may still be one of the hottest tickets in London's West End, but on Broadway Enron, the play, has proved a financial disaster and is to close after just 15 performances.

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Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us