Arts and Entertainment

'A marriage ending feels like a bomb going off'

Fashion: Absolutely Fabien: In the second of an occasional series on people who influence fashion from within, Fabien Baron, creative director of the American magazine Harper's Bazaar, talks about his career and his much-imitated graphic wizardry

IF I HAD Fabien Baron's view, I'd be awestruck into inactivity. We're sky-high, up above most of the apartment blocks between Broadway and Central Park, with clouds and a few helicopters beyond a wall of plate glass. 'One day the sky is all black] Next day, sun for a hundred miles] Next day, snow]' he exclaims in his high-pitched voice, addressing the city spread out beneath him. The office we're in is small; just a huge computer, swivel chairs, a dartboard and the work-surface we have our elbows on as we stare out to the horizon. The view is the clue to Fabien Baron's importance; in Manhattan, size isn't everything, vista is.

Ivory Towers: Close contact sports

WE CONCLUDE our browse through the journal Perceptual and Motor Skills with news on sport, fashion and subliminal messages.

In his own fashion: William Klein didn't give a hoot for hemlines and his pictures prove it. Jane Richards takes a snapshot of the subversive photographer

A black-and-white close-up photograph has a pair of wrestlers fighting on the grass. They loom large to the right of the photo; to the left is the audience, two fellow Italians cheering them on. The full impact of their aggression forces you into the photograph. Then you see the model. She's bang in the centre of the image but she's looking straight at the camera, indifferent to the action surrounding her, caught up in her own aura.

FASHION / Style Notes

'HE WON'T do an interview with you,' says Bernadine Morris, fashion editor of the New York Times. She should know. She's worked with the street photographer Bill Cunningham on the fashion scene for more than 20 years. 'He wants the pictures to speak instead.'

Fashion: No fuss, no frills, no problem: Unfussy coats; zipless jackets: the look is simple and monochrome. Marion Hume reports on New Puritanism

Midwinter style comes unadorned. The tricky detailing of the past is replaced by clean, straight lines. Instead of bright colours and pattern, there are monochromatic tones of black and polar white. In place of baubles, bangles and beads is absolutely nothing at all.

EXHIBITIONS / Every picture tells half a story: If it has just opened in London, it's probably photography. Tom Lubbock reviews a retrospective of the great Bill Brandt, and rounds up Blumenfeld, Citroen, Modotti and more Brandt

IN THE library of photography, the fiction section turns out to be bigger than one thought. Robert Doisneau's immortal Kiss is now famous for not being the spontaneous clinch it once seemed. Robert Capa's Moment of Death, some have claimed, was a moment rehearsed. And the Barbican's Bill Brandt retrospective seeks to dispel any illusions about the photographer being a documentary realist. The curator, Ian Jeffrey, calls him 'an illustrator, with a taste for melodrama'. We're asked to see his camera not as a witness to the world, but principally as a medium for making pictures.

Caught in his own spotlight

THERE is something uncanny in the youthfulness of Richard Avedon, something preternatural about that slim, energetic, bejeaned figure with the flying mane of grey, swivelling against a line of his own compelling portraits. He's 70 years old, but looks nearer 30 - so young, in fact, that the hair colour seems almost cosmetic. Look how consciously he has positioned himself in the picture - the human target in a shooting gallery of cut-out heads; dramatically turning back, arm flung out like a duellist to face the camera. 'How could he not be conscious of the camera?' said the photographer Maggie Steber. 'He knows so much about what it can do.'

FASHION / The new mood: Dirty realism has reached fashion. The whole world is changing. Globs of gold and short, sharp suits have ceded to bagginess, scruffiness, second-hand and ethnic clothes. If you don't like it, these are the people responsible

IT IS THE LAST leg of the fashion season, after London, Milan and Paris. The Virgin Atlantic flight to New York is delayed, which means that the glossy fashion people - the ones on big expense accounts with the wraparound dark glasses - are already halfway across the Atlantic while the rest are slumped in the Heathrow departure lounge, feeling tired and tetchy and looking worse in the harsh, bright light.

Cher: The mercy tour: Cher wasn't sure what sent her to stricken Armenia, land of her fathers, to hand out love and toys. But she was looking for a way to change her life, and this seemed a good place to start

'FOR A WHILE, I've been thinking, how do I change my life, how do I change my life? And the only way to change your life is to go ahead and change your life, you know? I'm really bored with my life and it's up to me to change it. I just know that if you start making little baby steps in a different direction, you leave the place that you're in. You know?'

Fashion: Clad in clodhoppers and very little else: What to wear with that tissue-thin tea dress? Doc Martens, perhaps, or even a pair of Wellington boots

CHIROPODISTS should be thrilled. The required footwear for this summer does not come with dainty little Louis heels or teetering stilettos, writes Marion Hume. If you are not walking barefoot - which may look fresh and lovely in fashion pictures, but is a touch impractical for most real life - the shape of summer footwear looks surprisingly like that of your foot.

STYLE / A dogfight to get close to the catwalk: At Chanel's Paris show what really matters is where you sit, says Roger Tredre

IT'S WHERE you sit that counts. The 17 most prized seats in international fashion are in the front row at the end of the catwalk at the Chanel ready-to-wear show. The people who filled these seats on Thursday are the ones who make things happen in fashion. They are the world's most powerful arbiters of style; designers know that their verdicts on a collection are the ones that count.

Dedicated followers of fashion dress down

NEVER MIND the fashion shows. At the ready-to-wear collections in Paris, the audience (see left) is the thing, writes Roger Tredre. The shows present fantasy visions displayed on models with unnaturally long legs and slim waists. The women in the audience come in all shapes and sizes.

Money can't buy you grunge

TO THE fashion world, 'grunge' is the look of the moment. Since November, when Christian Francis Roth and Marc Jacobs, two American designers barely known in Europe, showed their new collections in New York, no catwalk has been complete without its version of the dressed-down Seventies' hippie style.

FASHION / Communiques: Fashion hasn't had a great year: poor sales, retro-inspiration. But for these four it was their best yet

THEY'VE been at it all year. In fact, as far as popular memory goes, they've been at it since 1965, when Bob Dylan tossed off the words to 'Subterranean Homesick Blues' one by one on bits of card in Don't Look Back. The 'conceptual' message-card has been adopted by the fashion world this year in imitation of the ex-Goldsmith's student Gillian Wearing's art-project - getting passers-by to scrawl their words and have their picture taken on the street. Her work has been shown in Milan, and Italian Vogue and The Face have already paid their dues. In the case of Italian Vogue, with a rather more luxurious adaptation - for 'passers-by' read most of the fashion illuminati, plus Nan Kempner, the original social X-ray, and retro rocker Lenny Kravitz. For 'artist', read photographer Stephen Meisel. So what could be more obvious than to replicate the idea with four people for whom, in the world of style and glamour, 1992 has been a huge success.

Obituary: Millicent Fenwick

Millicent Hammond, politician, born New York City 20 February 1910, married Hugh Fenwick (one son, and one daughter deceased; marriage dissolved), died Bernardsville New Jersey 16 September 1992.
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Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

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5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

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A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

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Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
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The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

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How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

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We will remember them

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Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

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