Arts and Entertainment On unfamiliar turf: ‘Network’ by Tom Price

He talks to Hannah Duguid about how his life has informed his art

Mark Leckey: See We Assemble, Serpentine Gallery, London

Imagine the art exhibition as a blockbuster action movie: perhaps something like The Expendables (2010), in which hefty stars like Sylvester Stallone and Bruce Willis are brought together (at last!) to spray bullets, pummel and high five: powerful presences brought together. Mark Leckey, in his first major public gallery show in London since winning the Turner Prize in 2008, has brought together some other powerful presences – brands – as though they were the stars of his show. Artists, galleries, electronics companies: all flattened into brands. Samsung! Henry Moore! Serpentine! Fiorucci! Hyde Park! Entering the Serpentine, one is confronted with a trailer for this exhibition – the one that is happening now – announcing the presence of these in his show.

Turner prize artist Mark Leckey reveals plans for new exhibition

Mark Leckey, a Turner prize-winning artist, has likened a Henry Moore sculpture to a Samsung refrigerator, calling them both highly marketable brands that trade off the legacy of their names.

Henry Moore: Prints and Portfolios, Henry Moore Institute, Leeds

Was it a rage against the dying of the light that caused Henry Moore to produce so much in his last two decades?

Sculpture, but not as we know it

A Royal Academy exhibition shows some of the great works of the last hundred years, but ignores the art that excites the public, says Adrian Hamilton

Modern British Sculpture, Royal Academy, London

Moore and Hepworth aside, our Modernists persistently failed to hit the target

Great Works: Iris, Messenger of the Gods (circa 1895), Auguste Rodin

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Royal Academy to celebrate a century of British sculpture

A crumbling barnyard, a room full of page three girls and a previously undisplayed work by Damien Hirst will be among the artworks included in the first retrospective of 20th century British sculpture to be held in this country for nearly three decades.

Michael Glover: Of the 'greats' on display, Hepworth is the best of a bad bunch

How much great 20th century British sculpture has there really been? Surprisingly little. When painting was transforming itself almost beyond recognition in the early decades of the 20th century, sculpture seemed woefully absent, as if it didn't really know what role to play, as if it lacked confidence in its own purpose.

David Lee: Nowhere is safe from epidemic of monstrous works by Kapoor and Co

The announcement that Anish Kapoor is to exhibit large sculptures at the Serpentine is no surprise. After all, since his retrospective closed at the Royal Academy he hasn't been shown in London for all of nine months.

Cultural Life: William Turnbull, sculptor

Visual Arts: I went to Barry Flanagan's posthumous show at Waddington Galleries. I thought Barry was a very good artist although I prefer his work prior to the hares. I've also just been to the Henry Moore show at Tate Britain. I think Moore is a great artist but his work has never moved me in the same way as Giacometti or Brancusi. I saw the Turner and Richard Long show also at the Tate. The Turner was my favourite of the three. I thought the Long show was very interesting but not really my thing.

£152m art sale sets British record – yet onlookers leave disappointed

It was expected to be Britain's most valuable art auction yet, and the chattering classes who had turned out to Christie's in style simply oozed money. Yet by the end of the evening, everyone was a bit disappointed that more had not been spent.

Michael Glover: Hepworth's work was purer and more cerebral than Moore's

The names of Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth will forever be intertwined. Born in the same part of Yorkshire and within five years of each other, they went on to work together.

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