Welcome to the new Independent website. We hope you enjoy it and we value your feedback. Please contact us here.

Henry Moore

Brrrr… can Frieze get any cooler?

Ten years ago, an art fair pitched a tent in London's Regent's Park. Now film stars and oligarchs queue to get in to the HQ of the see-and-be-seen art scene. Charlotte Philby examines its cultural significance

Mark Leckey: See We Assemble, Serpentine Gallery, London

Imagine the art exhibition as a blockbuster action movie: perhaps something like The Expendables (2010), in which hefty stars like Sylvester Stallone and Bruce Willis are brought together (at last!) to spray bullets, pummel and high five: powerful presences brought together. Mark Leckey, in his first major public gallery show in London since winning the Turner Prize in 2008, has brought together some other powerful presences – brands – as though they were the stars of his show. Artists, galleries, electronics companies: all flattened into brands. Samsung! Henry Moore! Serpentine! Fiorucci! Hyde Park! Entering the Serpentine, one is confronted with a trailer for this exhibition – the one that is happening now – announcing the presence of these in his show.

Royal Academy to celebrate a century of British sculpture

A crumbling barnyard, a room full of page three girls and a previously undisplayed work by Damien Hirst will be among the artworks included in the first retrospective of 20th century British sculpture to be held in this country for nearly three decades.

Julian Andrews: British Council arts envoy who worked with Henry Moore

Julian Andrews was in many ways typical of his generation of employees of the British Council, where he spent almost the whole of his working life. His outgoing personality and individuality appealed to colleagues in both the Home and the Overseas Services of the Council and although his combative attitudes to excessive bureaucracy caused friction, he won the respect of everyone with whom he worked.

The dark side of Henry Moore

In his thirties, the establishment's favourite sculptor was exploring erotically charged emotions and a rebellious streak, a new exhibition reveals. Andy McSmith reports

More headlines