Arts and Entertainment On unfamiliar turf: ‘Network’ by Tom Price

He talks to Hannah Duguid about how his life has informed his art

Tom Sutcliffe: Terror rides to remember

The Week In Culture

Philip Hensher: The waste of time that is careers advice

Even now, children of doctors become doctors, and children of manual labourers become manual labourers

Henry Moore, Tate Britain, London

The town-square monoliths of his late period were far from the sculptor's finest work, as this retrospective shows

Henry Moore: Invasion of the genetic mutants

Masterpieces – or works whose formless monstrosity is little short of grotesque? As the Henry Moore retrospective opens at Tate Britain, Tom Lubbock adjudicates

The dark side of Henry Moore

In his thirties, the establishment's favourite sculptor was exploring erotically charged emotions and a rebellious streak, a new exhibition reveals. Andy McSmith reports

BBC to reveal unseen Henry Moore

Groundbreaking deal allows footage of sculptor at work to be shown to public. Ian Burrell reports

Hitler, mothers, navelgazing: Richard Cork recalls the revealing day he spent with sculptor Henry Moore

On the eve of a major retrospective, Richard Cork recalls the extraordinary day he called on the sculptor Henry Moore – and opened some old wounds

Qing Dynasty: Art of stone

An exhibition of naturally sculpted rocks from China's Qing Dynasty makes for the most mysterious show in Britain, says Tom Lubbock

Voices Against War: A Century of Protest, by Lyn Smith

My father had a bad war, but then most pacifists did. He didn't have a very good peace either, as soldiers returned from a victory in which he was only too aware he had played no part.

House & garden: How one London home seamlessly blends outside and in

It's rare to find a home that combines the two so organically – and effectively too, says Anna Pavord

A museum without walls: 60 years on Thames & Hudson have changed the way we look at art

Walter Neurath and Eva Feuchtwang met in London during the Second World War. They had both fled Nazi Europe and they shared a passion for art and design. When they met they were both married to other people but Walter and Eva became friends, colleagues, then lovers before they married one another in 1950, a year after they had co-founded the publishing house Thames & Hudson. With offices in London and New York, their company was named after the main river in each city. Their aim was to produce well-illustrated, well-written books on art, painting, architecture and sculpture. Walter wanted their venture to be a "museum without walls", a way of bringing art to the masses at a price they could afford.

Royal Artillery? No, the Royal Academy

Gallery throws open its doors to honour Anish Kapoor – and his exploding cannon

Cultural Life: Sian Phillips, actress

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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn
Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Meet the man who doesn't want to go down in history as the country's last Scottish Secretary
Legoland Windsor's master model-makers reveal the tricks of their trade (including how to stop the kids wrecking your Eiffel Tower)

Meet the people who play with Lego for a living

They are the master builders: Lego's crack team of model-makers, who have just glued down the last of 650,000 bricks as they recreate Paris in Windsor. Susie Mesure goes behind the scenes
The 20 best days out for the summer holidays: From Spitfires to summer ferry sailings

20 best days out for the summer holidays

From summer ferry sailings in Tyne and Wear and adventure days at Bear Grylls Survival Academy to Spitfires at the Imperial War Museum Duxford and bog-snorkelling at the World Alternative Games...
Open-air theatres: If all the world is a stage, then everyone gets in on the act

All the wood’s a stage

Open-air productions are the cue for better box-office receipts, new audiences, more interesting artistic challenges – and a picnic
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Rupert Cornwell: A Republican with an eye on the world

Rand Paul is laying out his presidential stall by taking on his party's disastrous record on foreign policy
Self-preservation society: Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish

Self-preservation society

Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish
Generation gap opens a career sinkhole

Britons live ever longer, but still society persists in glorifying youth

We are living longer but considered 'past it' younger, the reshuffle suggests. There may be trouble ahead, says DJ Taylor