Arts and Entertainment On unfamiliar turf: ‘Network’ by Tom Price

He talks to Hannah Duguid about how his life has informed his art

Rubens, Millais and Moore keep the taxman happy

A MILLAIS painting, a Rubens masterpiece and a Henry Moore sculpture are among the latest objets d'art to be given to the nation in lieu of inheritance tax.

A picture of me, from Henry Moore to his girlfriend, surrounded by nudes his girfriend

IN A newly discovered letter from Henry Moore to a girlfriend, the sculptor paints an idyllic picture of himself sitting in a shady garden reading her letters while in the company of nude women.

THE INFORMATION on - `The Shape of the Century'

What Is It?

Visual arts: Not just a load of giant eyeballs

Britain is not exactly renowned for its Surrealist movement. But it did happen - and it did pioneer some original ideas.

Sculpture: The Shape of the Century

The visual arts element of the Salisbury Festival has been getting stronger and stronger and this year looks like the best yet. In particular the success of showing sculpture in the beautiful setting of the Cathedral and Close is followed, and developed, by an ambitious survey of British sculpture since 1900. I say ambitious because it attempts to follow the path of English modernism from the likes of Eric Gill and Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, through Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth, to contemporary sculptors such as Stephen Cox and Rachel Whiteread. It's a complicated route, but for the most part they have found a clear way.

Obituaries: Sir Dirk Bogarde

LIKE GARBO before him, Dirk Bogarde mysteriously exceeded the sum of his parts. Many of his 63 films were forever banal, while others initially thrilling and controversial were tamed or stultified by time. In a career spanning almost 60 years he willingly switched disguise, but neither wigs nor breeches, the officer's khaki nor the doctor's white coat, could long conceal his limitations of range. When he offered subtlety and suggestiveness instead of versatility those limitations appeared almost a virtue; but with the failure of that exchange in the mid-1970s his acting became almost intolerably arch and repetitive.

ESSAY

Charles Saumarez Smith, Director of the National Portrait Gallery, remembers Patrick Heron, who died last week

exhibition: from the bomb to the beatles

Meander down memory lane - be it yours or your granny's - as The Imperial War Museum launches a major exhibition focusing on post-war Britain. "From the Bomb to the Beatles", designed by Sir Terence Conran, chronicles changes in Britain between 1945 and 1965; from post-war austerity to "you've never had it so good". Memorabilia includes stage costumes worn by John Lennon and Marilyn Monroe, a pink sapphire ring which belonged to Elvis, and art and sculpture by artists Henry Moore and Peter Blake. Also highlighted are classic domestic items such as tin baths, washing powder and Minis. A complementary programme of demonstrations and talks addresses the development of the consumer lifestyle, from fashion to food and film.

Arts: Material witness

For George Kennethson sculpting in stone was like 'walking on a tightrope'. But his mastery of the medium kept him faithful, despite critical neglect.

Henry Moore sent back to his office

ONE of Britain's most respected art-gallery directors yesterday derided a test-case ruling by the Deputy Prime Minister that a Henry Moore sculpture must be returned to the office building of which it was "an integral part."

Travel: More Moore

EXHIBITIONS TO CELEBRATE THE SCULPTOR'S CENTENARY

Travel: Bronze Age revisited

The sculptor Henry Moore was born 100 years ago. His centenary is being marked in the quiet Hertfordshire village where he lived.

Revealed: the lumps, spiders and erotica in the ministers' offices

FOR THE last 100 years, the Government Art Collection has been one of Whitehall's best kept secrets, so much so that most people do not even know what it is, which artists are on show or how much it is worth.

Liverpool goes bananas over its yellow sculpture

THE latest bizarre addition to the Liverpool skyline - a giant half-lamb, half-banana sculpture - is manoeuvred into position.

Architecture: James Turrell: he's in a different class

Staff at a Quaker school in Yorkshire may not be impressed that Turrell, the American master of light and space, has chosen to exhibit his latest creations in one of their classrooms - but Nonie Niesewand is
Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent
Markus Persson: If being that rich is so bad, why not just give it all away?

That's a bit rich

The billionaire inventor of computer game Minecraft says he is bored, lonely and isolated by his vast wealth. If it’s that bad, says Simon Kelner, why not just give it all away?
Euro 2016: Chris Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Wales last qualified for major tournament in 1958 but after several near misses the current crop can book place at Euro 2016 and end all the indifference
Rugby World Cup 2015: The tournament's forgotten XV

Forgotten XV of the rugby World Cup

Now the squads are out, Chris Hewett picks a side of stars who missed the cut
A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago
Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests