Arts and Entertainment On unfamiliar turf: ‘Network’ by Tom Price

He talks to Hannah Duguid about how his life has informed his art

Art of Africa : the show of a lifetime

`It can be horrible and terrifying and beautiful and bafflingly direct in its sheer strangeness.' Andrew Graham-Dixon on the RA's brilliant exhibition

OBITUARY: Gottfried Bermann Fischer

Gottfried Bermann Fischer was one of the last remaining pillars of the book publishing world as it has been known for the last 200 years. He died in his 99th year, and had been active until almost the last days of his life.

EXHIBITIONS / Just a little bit Moore

Bernard Meadows, purveyor of the `geometry of fear', has spent years escaping the legacy of Henry Moore

Blood out of stone

An exhibition in Yorkshire sees African sculptors at work among the Moores and Hepworths. Jonathan Glancey watches art in the making

Reward offered for Moore statue's heads

MARIANNE MACDONALD

Up the workers. A travelling French artist takes his cue from rusty biscuit tins, inspirational carpets, a town's forgotten past and trouble at t'mill. By Adrian Searle

With his stacks of old biscuit tins, his photographs of anonymous school kids and murder victims, his mounds of laundry, his lamps and lists of names, Christian Boltanski travels the art world, dragging his litter behind him. One of the few exportable French artists of recent years, his works are an attempt to commemorate the 20th century's depredations: the victims of the holocaust, the "disappeared" of Latin America, murdered innocents. Boltanski has made a career from remembrance; those whom the artist recalls are always spoken for, but never speak; remembered, but never identified.

The sculptor's tragedy

BARBARA HEPWORTH: A LIFE OF FORMS Sally Festing Viking pounds 20

BOOK REVIEW : Flickering forms on the edge of movement

Looking at GIACOMETTI David Sylvester Chatto & Windus, £25

ART / Thinking through the sense of touch: Lynn MacRitchie applauds Barbara Hepworth's eventual resolution of apparently irreconcilable sculptural traditions

Carving - cutting with hammer and chisel directly into stone or wood - is a demanding discipline. Fingers bruise and bleed, arms ache. Surveying Barbara Hepworth's sculptures - arranged in elegant variety at the Tate Gallery, Liverpool, in the first retrospective since her death nearly 20 years ago - it is difficult to comprehend that these serene objects could be the product of hard, physical labour. But a careful look into the heart of wooden pieces such as Oval Form (Penwith Landscape) (1955-56) for example, reveals some of the hundreds of careful chisel strokes needed to realise each form.

Letter: Moore could draw very well

'THE fact is that Moore couldn't draw at all.' So ends Tim Hilton's review of the National Portrait Gallery's show of Master Drawings ('Every picture tells a life story', Sunday Review, 28 August).

Letter: Henry Moore could draw

TIM HILTON occasionally enjoys provoking his readers, but his assertion that Henry Moore could not draw goes rather further and deserves a rebuttal ('Every picture tells a life story', Sunday Review, 28 August). I would agree that some drawings from Moore's later years, when he was ill, are not of the same level as his earlier work. I suspect that given the choice he might not have wanted them all to be shown; but that certainly does not mean that he could not draw.

Opinions: Should we keep this statue?

RICHARD HARRIES, Bishop of Oxford: I am in favour of keeping The Three Graces. On whether the money should be better spent - well, we find the same problem in the Church - money available for one thing may not be available for another.

Design Dinosaurs: 19: The electric typewriter

DESIGN historians adore typewriters. Encapsulated in those bodyshells is the saga of three ages of technology - mechanical, electrical and electronic.

Obituary: Lucebert

Lubertus Jacobis Swaanswijk (Lucebert), poet, artist: born Amsterdam 15 September 1924; PC Hooft Dutch State Prize for Literature, 1968; books include Triangel in de Jungle gevolgd door de dieren der democratic (Triangle in the jungle followed by the animals of democracy) 1951; Lucebert Edited By Lucebert 1963; Collected Poems 1948-1963 1965; The Tired Lovers They Are Machines 1974; Van de roerloze woelgeest (From the motionless tumble spirit) 1993; married (one son, three daughters); died Alkmaar, the Netherlands 11 May 1994.
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