Arts and Entertainment On unfamiliar turf: ‘Network’ by Tom Price

He talks to Hannah Duguid about how his life has informed his art

ART / It's all too easy - to forget: Installation art is everywhere - even in the bookshops. But does that make it any good?

FOR THOSE who seek a survey of a widespread new movement, a new book, Installation Art, provides a comprehensive guide. It has been compiled by Nicolas de Oliveira, Nicola Oxley and Michael Petry, who are the co- founders of London's Museum of Installation, the only one devoted to such art, and Michael Archer, who is a lecturer at Chelsea School of Art. Nearly 200 pieces, by half as many artists, are photographed in colour and described, while Archer's introduction is a theoretical piece that finds the roots of installation in Duchamp, Dada and Futurism.

ART / Still reckless after all these years: In 1960, Anthony Caro's 'breakthrough' revolutionised sculpture. Three decades on, his innovations haven't ceased, as two new shows illustrate

SIR ANTHONY Caro was 70 last week. To mark the occasion the Annely Juda gallery has mounted a special exhibition, 'Sculpture through Five Decades, 1955- 1994', while at Kenwood House there is a display of new work that's not only recently made but also unprecedented. For here are 38 sculptures on a literary theme: the classical story of the Trojan wars. Caro has surprised us many times, but no previous show has overturned the tenets of his art in the way we see at Kenwood. It's almost reckless. Caro accosts rather than illustrates the epic Greek history, and in doing so has thrust aside his formal abstraction and self-contained lyric purity.

Henry Moore's daughter loses six-figure sum trying to claim pounds 200m sculptures and drawings held by trust

A reclining figure, one of the Henry Moore Foundation's works at Perry Green, Hertfordshire, whose ownership was contested unsuccessfully in the High Court yesterday.

Moore's daughter loses pounds 200m sculptures claim

HENRY MOORE'S daughter was left facing six-figure court costs yesterday after failing in an attempt to claim pounds 200m of her father's sculptures and drawings from the trust he set up in the final years of his life.

LEADERS OF THE PACK / A veteran with youthful verve: Artist Of The Year

A YEAR of disappointments, leading to a fear that the large formal exhibition is in decline. At the Hayward in January 'Gravity and Grace' was a poor survey of anti-form and anti-art sculpture of two decades ago, dismal throughout. 'Paris Post-War' at the Tate, concentrating on existentialist gloom, told only a quarter of the story of French art after the Liberation. The Barbican put on 'The Sixties Art Scene in London', all very jolly but lacking real force. And then came the fiasco of the RA's 'American Art in the 20th Century' - ill-researched, unhistorical, bigoted and insensitive.

Sculpture: Out of the darkness came the light: Anthony Caro was Henry Moore's assistant. But is he also his rival? Two new books suggest we should look again at their relationship

A COUPLE of new books commemorate exhibitions abroad by two major British sculptors, and I think these publications are significant. David Cohen's Moore in the Bagatelle Gardens is about the show of Henry Moore's late monumental bronzes in Paris last year. Caro at the Trajan Markets, by Giovanni Carandente, records the retrospective installed last year at a dramatic site in Rome. Identical in format and beautifully produced (Lund Humphries, pounds 37.50 each), the books show how both men have filled public places with modern sculpture. There are obviously lessons here, but I was more interested in the way that the two artists suddenly look like rivals.

Henry Moore's bronze sculpture Two Place Reclining Figure No 5

Henry Moore's bronze sculpture Two Place Reclining Figure No 5, which was completed in 1964, being hoisted back into its place at the Kenwood Estate, Hampstead Heath, London, yesterday after undergoing routine conservation work.

Moore forgeries flood market: Britain's finest modern sculptor is being faked as never before, but the law prevents works being taken out of circulation

HUNDREDS of sculptures and drawings masquerading as the work of Henry Moore, the greatest British sculptor of the 20th century, are circulating on the art market, specialists have revealed to the Independent on Sunday.

Henry Moore's daughter sues over artworks: High Court case will clarify rights to 'artist's copy'. Marianne Macdonald reports

HENRY MOORE'S daughter yesterday took the Henry Moore Foundation to court claiming ownership of sculptures and drawings by her father estimated at up to pounds 200m.

ART / Rubble without a cause: James Hall contemplates the cult of the fragment, sermons in stones and the impact of 'challenged' sculpture

When is a ruin a ruin, and when is a ruin rubble? This is a multi-million dollar question, and it has been taxing the world's finest minds for several centuries. The taxonomy of ruins is now so complex that the architectural historian Robert Harbison recently called for a 'careful series of the degrees of ruin like a paint chart or colour wheel'. A ruin chart is exactly what is needed at two shows that have just opened in Leeds.

Exhibitions: Carving up a fortune: Henry Moore's foundation has been spending again on a new pounds 5m sculpture gallery in Leeds. But is the money being used wisely?

THE HENRY MOORE Foundation is a charitable body that spends money on sculpture. Though its activities aren't much advertised, last week's opening of the new Henry Moore Institute in Leeds draws attention to the foundation's work and the large sums of money involved. Seriously large sums: the foundation is still expanding, and already it is giving away more than pounds 1m a year in grants, quite apart from the monies that are used to maintain Moore's old home at Much Hadham in Hertfordshire or to establish such new premises as this pounds 5m development in the centre of Leeds.

Architecture: A wry expression on the face of an old friend: Red-brick Victoriana did not get a look in at the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds. Rowan Moore reports

MOST of the anguish surrounding modern architecture concerns its public face. Confined to natty shops and restaurants, no one minds modernism's directness and lack of disguise. When it appears in the cherished centres of great cities, everyone starts to howl. 'Carbuncles' and other facial metaphors are bandied about.

Architecture Update: Moore centre fails road test

PLANS by the Henry Moore Foundation to build a visitors' centre at the sculptor's former home at Perry Green, Hertfordshire, have been rejected by Michael Howard, Secretary of State for the Environment, after a public inquiry. The centre was designed by Jeremy Dixon and Edward Jones, architects of the Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, which opens next month. The Department of the Environment said that it was concerned at the possible increase in traffic 'on the substandard rural road network'. The foundation says it is now considering building a new road.
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