Arts and Entertainment

Something strange happened while I was watching the new series of US legal drama The Good Wife (More4) this week. I found myself humming the theme tune from Australian soap opera Home and Away. It was my unconscious mind's way of serenading new addition to the cast, Melissa George.

From solar-powered chalets to yurts with iPod docks a new breed of chic festival digs offer an alternative to the humble tent

Anybody who's spent a weekend in a field sipping warm lager and leaping about to The Verve will be only too familiar with the downside of festivals. The tent. If it's sunny outside, it's clammy inside. If it rains, leaks are guaranteed. Smears of mud, spilled bottles of Magners and and poisonous sleeping bags can turn the average nylon shelter into a no-go area.

Top of the pods: Mark Diacono reveals his passion for peas

Mark Diacono's enthusiasm for peas has already won over his neighbour Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. And now he's working his magic on Emma Townshend...

Pandora: Lammy takes a break from his brief

Pandora very much hopes that David Lammy – MP and Mastermind contestant extraordinaire – hasn't ruffled too many Foreign Office feathers with his recent article in support of London's Tamil protests.

Organic food sales fall in credit crunch

Shoppers bought fewer organic fruit and vegetables last year while the economy deteriorated, according to the Soil Association.

60 years old: happy birthday to the single

What was the first record you ever bought? As the 7-inch disc celebrates six decades, Jonathan Owen asks 60 celebrities for their musical memories

Fearnley-Whittingstall continues pecking at Tesco with new label

Celebrity chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall continued to peck at Tesco today with a graphic new food label showing the plight of intensively farmed chickens.

When it comes to budgeting, the old ways are the best

Using up leftovers? Sewing our own clothes? The money-saving tips of the past are just as relevant today

Trade secrets: Top chefs reveal their guilty pleasures

What is Valentine Warner's guiltiest pleasure? What was Angela Hartnett's real-life kitchen nightmare? And what does Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall want for Christmas?

David Prosser's Outlook: Tesco makes its long-awaited move into India

There was a moment, back in June, when one just began to wonder whether Tesco's seemingly unstoppable forward momentum was finally starting to falter. A row with food writer Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall over its chicken-rearing standards was unwelcome publicity. Calls from US presidential candidate Barack Obama for better labour practices in America were embarrassing too. And then there was a trading update suggesting Tesco's sales growth had slipped compared with several rival supermarket groups.

Questions Of Cash: With set-top TV boxes, Sky sets the limits...

Q. I have a Sky TV package, which gives me a second Sky set-top box for £10 extra a month – £45 in total – allowing me to watch Sky on two TVs in my house. A condition is that there must be two phone lines, with each set-top box permanently connected to a phone line. When I moved home, I arranged for two phone lines, and Sky engineers installed the two-box service. One phone line failed and Sky warned me I would be charged in full for two boxes if this continued. I had the phone connection repaired and performed Sky's on-screen system check, which gave me the message "line connected". I thought the problem was settled. I recently checked my bank statements and found that I had paid the full amount for two boxes for at least a year, which is more than £300 extra. I pay by direct debit and I have not received any bills by post. JC, Reading

Leading article: Tesco is a victim of its success – but it deserves some of the flak

It is not difficult to find reasons to criticise Tesco. The supermarket chain has become a sort of British Wal-Mart, not only in the sense of its dominance of the domestic retail sector, but as shorthand for corporate nastiness. Barely a week passes without it being accused of some crime or other, from bullying farmers, to crushing small traders, to polluting the environment.

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall hits cash target to take on Tesco over chicken welfare

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, the chef and food campaigner, has raised the money he needs to put his concerns on animal welfare to Tesco's shareholders.

Cost of Living: Greenhouses

So, the summer is here, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall is back on television and the green-fingered, or eco-minded, among us will be just itching to tear up the patio and plant a row of runner beans.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent