News Anjem Choudary refused to condemn Lee Rigby's murder

Broadcaster criticised for prime slot in which he refused to condemn murder Lee Rigby

Ready to kick butt: Dame Ann Leslie

The Week in Radio: Firecrackers, fur coats and some good news at last

"Are you looking for a job?" James Naughtie asked Dame Ann Leslie on Radio 4's Today, a note of panic in his voice. Now there's an idea. As one of the programme's guest editors, Leslie, the veteran foreign correspondent who famously went to war in a fur coat, arrived like a blast of cold air in a sticky sauna. You can imagine plenty of previous guests proffering feature ideas cobbled together by their agents, but not Leslie. She was first in the office, her sleeves rolled up and ready to kick some serious butt.

They've still got the shortlist from last time, but which candidate can rescue the BBC?

The Independent's media editor on the search for an outsider to wipe the slate clean after the Newsnight ‘paedophile’ report and Entwistle’s resignation

All change at top of BBC – for now – in the director merry-go-round

At least a dozen senior BBC executives have left or changed their roles as a result of the abuse scandal.

Editorial: The answer for the BBC is reform, not a witch-hunt

These are the darkest of days for the BBC. Weeks after the corporation was plunged into turmoil and self-recrimination over the decision to pull a Newsnight investigation into Jimmy Savile, it is paying an even bigger price for having compensated for its caution by reacting in the opposite way; rushing out another Newsnight programme on child abuse, this time accusing an unnamed "senior Tory" who we now all believe was intended to be Lord McAlpine.

George Entwistle has resigned from the BBC

Newsnight fiasco: How events unfolded

25 November 2011 Newsnight editor Peter Rippon gives the all-clear for investigation into claims that Jimmy Savile abused children.

Joan Smith: Give the viewers a break, Jeremy Paxman

You can't hear some presenters without wishing they'd shut up

Miliband's response to his critics, 'Don't declare the result of the race when it is not yet half-run'

Matthew Norman: Ed Miliband's big problem

Other, cleverer people incessantly tell me how supernaturally useless Little Ed is in every way, and why. They dismiss the defence, by way of praising his agenda-dominating boldness (knifing Murdoch) and prescience (good capitalism vs horrid capitalism), with a withering curl of the lips. Yet despite the brutal consensus that the guy is a fatally risible hyper-nerd, the only serious flaw I can find in Ed Miliband – and even this feels too trivial to mention – is that he happens to be Ed Miliband.

Sue Carroll died on Christmas Day

Diary: Why Plod will monitor the pews at tabloid star's funeral

It will be interesting to study the crowd when Sue Carroll, the chain-smoking, hard-living tabloid journalist who died from cancer on Christmas Day, is buried today in Richmond. A shop assistant's daughter from Newcastle Upon Tyne, she worked at the Sun, the News of the World, and latterly at the Daily Mirror, so her funeral will inevitably draw a galaxy of famous names from the tabloid press, past and present.

Matthew Norman: If politics is like sex, Ed will never find the national G-spot

For all the good that his 'relaunch' will do him, Miliband might as well have spoken in Klingon

The Blagger's Guide To...The Pen Quiz

London's literati gear up for the ultimate test

Ofcom rejects Mastermind contestant's complaint

A contestant on Mastermind who was called "astoundingly thick" after scoring only one point on his specialist subject has had his complaint rejected by the media watchdog Ofcom.

Diary: One more resignation to go, Gary

This column's sympathy goes out to the many unfortunate journalists losing their jobs at the News of the World – but particularly Gary Lineker. For while many hacks are justifiably upset by events, Lineker will be deprived not only of his column, but also of the chance to submit another principled letter of resignation. The ex-footballer relinquished his role with the Mail on Sunday when its Lord Triesman sting put England's 2018 World Cup bid in jeopardy. "The actions of the Mail on Sunday... have undermined the bid to bring the World Cup to England," he said at the time. And he was said to have been considering his role at NotW before yesterday's announcement, fearing that his reputation might be tarnished by association with the paper. (I am, of course, still awaiting Lineker's principled resignation from his estimated £1.5m-a-year job at Match of the Day, after the BBC broadcast Panorama's FIFA investigation in November: a programme widely credited with, er, undermining the bid to bring the World Cup to England. Ho hum.)

The Week in Radio: The charge of the light (music) brigade

It's hard to think of Radio 3 having a sense of mischief, or even a sense of humour, but how else to explain the Light Fantastic season, which coincided with Glastonbury? It's as though someone said the Glastonbury coverage will be absurdly over the top as usual, so let's come up with something more way out, eclectic and frankly against the grain. Something that people would never listen to while eating organic beansprouts in a quagmire. And they managed it. It's certainly hard to think of 100,000 people wallowing in mud and competing for latrines to hear Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass.

The Choice, Radio 4, Tuesday<br/>Outlook, World Service, Monday

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Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
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Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

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The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
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Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
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Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system
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Devil in blue Costa is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

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Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

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