News Anjem Choudary refused to condemn Lee Rigby's murder

Broadcaster criticised for prime slot in which he refused to condemn murder Lee Rigby

PM tells Humphrys to 'go back to school' in AV clash

Prime Minister David Cameron told one of the BBC's most senior journalists to go "back to school" today after accusing him of failing to understand the electoral reforms being voted on in Thursday's referendum.

'Mastermind' faces tough questions over lack of ethnic diversity

A quick-fire inquisition in the black leather Mastermind chair has long been regarded as the ultimate test of any trivia buff's knowledge and nerve.

Diary: George Soros should have some fun at Rupert Murdoch's expense

Andreas Whittam Smith once observed that it is an act of madness for a journalist to write an open letter (see Melanie Phillip's blog of last Tuesday: "An Open Letter To The Culture Secretary"). So I will not begin with: "Dear George Soros." But if you have access to the liberal philanthropist, pass on this suggestion concerning Rupert Murdoch's purported plan to keep further allegations about the News of the World hacking scandal out of the press. By offering bug-ees more than precedent insists a court would award, News International doesn't have to give evidence under oath in court. If Sienna Miller rejects Murdoch's £100,000 and is given less by a judge, for instance, she will automatically be liable for her costs and his. Mr Soros is a habitual victim of Murdochian malevolence. Glenn Beck has attacked him on Fox News in virulently anti-Semitic terms, by alleging that he was a Nazi collaborator while a teenager in Hungary, among other delights lifted from the Protocols of the Elders of Zion. If Mr Soros fancies revenge, he could indemnify anyone who wants to go to court but not to risk bankruptcy. It would cost Mr Soros millions to pick up the tab for even a few cases. But that's loose change for some mischievous fun.

Christina Patterson: Nasty nurses? Tell me something new

I, too, was a bit naïve. I thought they would know what operation you'd had, instead of asking you why you couldn't walk

Radio 4 team 'not too aggressive'

Presenters of Radio 4's Today programme are not too aggressive, the BBC's governing body said today.

Christina Patterson: How a prophet of protest lost the moral plot

Julian Assange has just revealed more of himself than was wise

Amy Jenkins: An obsession with extremes blinds us to those in the middle

There was a time in the early part of the last century when the term "middle class" was commonly used as an insult.

Miliband vows to move beyond New Labour

Ed Miliband will try to silence his critics today by spelling out his strategy for Labour to reconnect with the voters with whom it lost touch during 13 years in power.

First Morning: Daybreak, ITV

Chiles and Bleakley's 'Daybreak' looked different – but felt like 'GMTV'

The secret of happiness: Family, friends and your environment

How do you find contentment in an acquisitive society? By changing the things you spend your money on, says a US academic

The feral beast: Morgan all coy over Campbell

The diary can report a bit of a first, an enchanting outbreak of bashfulness from former Mirror editor Piers Morgan.

Diary: Joly poor show, Batman

If you can't win an Oscar then gracing the cover of your school's magazine is surely the next best thing. Such is the source of an unlikely spat between Dom Joly and Christopher Nolan, whose new movie, Inception, comes out next week. At a panel debate with some fellow comics to launch the Sky Movies Comic Book season, Joly made an impassioned case for Nolan's Batman Begins as the best of all Batman movies. Just one caveat: he and Nolan both attended the prestigious Haileybury School in Hertfordshire. To Joly's chagrin, Nolan has replaced him as the school mag's favourite alumnus. "I'm gutted," he said. "I used to be the most famous from the school; they were always putting me on the front of the magazine. Not anymore." Joly's claims seem almost plausible until one consults Wikipedia: other Old Haileyburians include Prime Minister Clement Attlee and the incumbent minister of state responsible for policing and criminal justice, Nick Herbert.

John Walsh: Stop agreeing and start fighting

How do the Tories and Lib Dems get through every day without winding each other up?
Arts and Entertainment
The teaser trailer has provoked more questions than answers
filmBut what is Bond's 'secret' that Moneypenny is talking about?
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football This was Kane’s night, even if he played just a small part of it
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travel Dreamland Margate, Britain’s oldest amusement park, is set to reopen
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Founders James Brown and Tim Southwell with a mock-up of the first ever ‘Loaded’ magazine in 1994
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Threlfall says: 'I am a guardian of the reality keys. I think I drive directors nuts'
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voices The group has just unveiled a billion dollar plan to help nurse the British countryside back to health
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The Westgate, a gay pub in the centre of Gloucester which played host to drag queens, has closed
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The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss