John Humphrys

Yes Sir! Mick Jagger: I could have been a teacher

Rolling Stones frontman Sir Mick Jagger has admitted he finds his music career "intellectually undemanding" and said his original idea of becoming a teacher might have been a "gratifying" alternative.

The Week in Radio: Firecrackers, fur coats and some good news at last

"Are you looking for a job?" James Naughtie asked Dame Ann Leslie on Radio 4's Today, a note of panic in his voice. Now there's an idea. As one of the programme's guest editors, Leslie, the veteran foreign correspondent who famously went to war in a fur coat, arrived like a blast of cold air in a sticky sauna. You can imagine plenty of previous guests proffering feature ideas cobbled together by their agents, but not Leslie. She was first in the office, her sleeves rolled up and ready to kick some serious butt.

Matthew Norman: Ed Miliband's big problem

Other, cleverer people incessantly tell me how supernaturally useless Little Ed is in every way, and why. They dismiss the defence, by way of praising his agenda-dominating boldness (knifing Murdoch) and prescience (good capitalism vs horrid capitalism), with a withering curl of the lips. Yet despite the brutal consensus that the guy is a fatally risible hyper-nerd, the only serious flaw I can find in Ed Miliband – and even this feels too trivial to mention – is that he happens to be Ed Miliband.

The Week in Radio: The charge of the light (music) brigade

It's hard to think of Radio 3 having a sense of mischief, or even a sense of humour, but how else to explain the Light Fantastic season, which coincided with Glastonbury? It's as though someone said the Glastonbury coverage will be absurdly over the top as usual, so let's come up with something more way out, eclectic and frankly against the grain. Something that people would never listen to while eating organic beansprouts in a quagmire. And they managed it. It's certainly hard to think of 100,000 people wallowing in mud and competing for latrines to hear Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass.

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Diary: Joly poor show, Batman

If you can't win an Oscar then gracing the cover of your school's magazine is surely the next best thing. Such is the source of an unlikely spat between Dom Joly and Christopher Nolan, whose new movie, Inception, comes out next week. At a panel debate with some fellow comics to launch the Sky Movies Comic Book season, Joly made an impassioned case for Nolan's Batman Begins as the best of all Batman movies. Just one caveat: he and Nolan both attended the prestigious Haileybury School in Hertfordshire. To Joly's chagrin, Nolan has replaced him as the school mag's favourite alumnus. "I'm gutted," he said. "I used to be the most famous from the school; they were always putting me on the front of the magazine. Not anymore." Joly's claims seem almost plausible until one consults Wikipedia: other Old Haileyburians include Prime Minister Clement Attlee and the incumbent minister of state responsible for policing and criminal justice, Nick Herbert.

Text messages are a direct – yet conveniently distant –

Sarah Goldman's 16-year-old son texted her from upstairs. "He had told me to go downstairs 10 minutes before and keep my phone on. I thought he was going to tell me a joke or something, and was slightly irritated. He then texted me and told me he was gay, and he hoped I could be happy for him.