Arts and Entertainment

The parade of musicians onto the Barbican stage has Norma Waterson at its centre, and there's a chair centre-stage for her, set between daughter Eliza and niece Marry, and spread either side stand musical friends and family – Martin Carthy, Olly Knight and Neill MacColl on guitars, multi-instrumentalist Kate St John, brilliant husky-voiced young singer John Smith duetting with an assured Kami Thompson, and committed turns from Richard Hawley and Jarvis Cocker, stick-thin enough to really do "The Scarecrow", one of many strange and wonderful works to trip from the mind of Lal Waterson.

Forfeit would hit grass roots hard

Racing: Vintage performance captures Cup

Outsider thwarts gamble in York feature while Nicholls sprinter strikes again at Ascot

Obituary: Lord Montague of Oxford

While still only 26, Montague founded his own electrical firm. `I used to make the goods, deliver them to the back door, and then go round to the front to collect the money'

Dilemmas: Why do my friends have to steal my child's name?

Graham's called his first baby Clementina after his mother, who died the day the child was born. Now his best friends are to call their new baby Clementina too - after an aunt. When he objects, they virtually say, `Like it or lump it. There's no copyright on names'. Is he silly to feel hurt?

Major's dither cost UK billions, says Lamont

THE FORMER Tory Chancellor Lord Lamont of Lerwick has described in his memoirs how Britain lost billions of pounds while John Major and senior Conservative cabinet ministers dithered on Black Wednesday seven years ago.

The Rugby World Cup: Best of tributes to fly-half and a half

The Multi-National: Stephen Bachop; Paul Trow says the former All Black is still a passing master

'Three terms' Blair takes axe to Brown ambitions

TONY BLAIR has finally crushed his Chancellor's ambitions to be Labour Prime Minister in an eve of conference message to British voters .

Pensioner killed his best friend in accident with antique gun

A PENSIONER shot dead his friend of more than 40 years as they examined an antique revolver, an inquest was told yesterday.

MP `died a broken man' after rejection by Blair

THE LATE MP Roger Stott died a broken man after he was denied ministerial status, his widow revealed yesterday.

Wetherspoon's opens way for beer price war

PUB-GOERS were raising their glasses to the prospect of a beer price war yesterday as two major pub chains announced plans to slash the price of a pint.

Countryside in crisis: The farmer of the future

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003