Arts and Entertainment A new Johnny Cash album will be released in March 2014

A collection of unheard country tracks will hit shops in March next year

Tompall Glauser was born in 1933 and had his very first taste of success in 1957

Tompall Glaser: One of country music’s Outlaws

In the strict, disciplined world of country music, Tompall Glaser was a maverick.

Getting shirty: Rihanna and Fonda are suing clothing companies for use of their images

From Rihanna to Peter Fonda: Your face here (whether you like it or not)

What do Peter Fonda and Rihanna have in common? Both have had their pictures appear on T-shirts without permission – and they’ve lawyered up. By Simon Usborne

Rachid Taha, Zoom (Wrasse)

Album review: Rachid Taha, Zoom (Wrasse)

The future of the Middle East probably lies with the likes of Rachid Taha.

Album: Tom Jones, Spirit in the Room (Island)

After his 1980s comeback, Jones spent two decades milking his kitsch appeal. Now, he wants us to take him seriously (and turn a blind eye to his participation in BBC1's execrable The Voice). 

Willy Mason, Hoxton Square Bar and Kitchen, London

“It’s been a while,” Willy Mason confesses. “It’s nice to see y’all.” The low-fi, alt-folkie has returned after a lengthy absence (five years, give or take the occasional low-key UK gig) to finally showcase new material.

Video: Jeremy Deller collaborates with London busker

Turner Prize-winning artist Jeremy Deller has released a record in collaboration with a London busker to coincide with his Joy in People show at the Hayward Gallery.

Lindi Ortega, The Borderline, London

Wow. On record, the slender Canadian comes across as a fairly conventional country singer, lamenting her achy breaky heart (“Dying of Another Broken Heart”) and her own dirty deception (“Little Lie”). It’s not material designed – unlike Bonnie Prince Billy and Jim White – to scare the horses.

Marshall Grant: Bassist at the heart of Johnny Cash’s distinctive sound

With musicians who could scarcely play their cheap and battered instruments, took drugs and drank heavily, fired guns and made bombs, Johnny Cash and the Tennessee Two sounds like a punk band from the mid-1970s, but they were the most seminal of the country groups from 20 years earlier. Marshall Grant played bass and can be heard on all their early records including the famed "Folsom Prison Blues" and "I Walk The Line". "We didn't work hard to get that boom-chicka-boom sound," he later admitted, "It was all we could play."

Album: Johnny Cash, Bootleg Vol 2: From Memphis to Hollywood (Sony)

The most rewarding part of this double-disc is the first quarter.

Million Dollar Quartet, Noel Coward Theatre, London

On 4 December 1956 the ultimate jam session took place. Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis gathered at the Sun studio of their mentor Sam Phillips to make music and conversation. What is remarkable is that there haven't been innumerable plays, films and TV documentaries about this seminal moment in pop history.

Album: Bob Geldof, How to Compose Popular Songs that Will Sell (Mercury)

Geldof has, it seems, found a novel way of composing songs which may or may not be popular or sell well: imitate other people's.

The Walkmen, Shepherd's Bush Empire, London

From Long John Baldry to Jarvis Cocker, beanpole pop stars seem to inspire a special kind of affection, and from the sensational performance he gave here, Hamilton Leithauser is worthy of being – as it were – right up there with them.

Album: Charlie Louvin, The Battles Rage On (True North)

Now in his eighties, the former Louvin Brother's latest album confronts military matters in ambivalent American manner – redemption and regret may loom as large here as in Johnny Cash's late work, but the inner-sleeve photo of a chippy-looking Charlie with his revolver tucked into his belt indicates the hawkish cast of a song like "Smoke on the Water", with its original villain Hitler joined by Saddam and Bin Laden.

Album: Justin Townes Earle, Harlem River Blues, Bloodshot

Steve Earle’s lanky boy’s fourth album. It’s a bluecountry gospel-rockabilly grunge record with soul inflections (well, horns).

The weird world of Joaquin Phoenix

He went from Oscar nominee to bearded crackpot bent on a rap career. But the 'meltdown' was all an act, writes David Usborne
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star
How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

Broadcasting plays and exhibitions to cinemas is a sure-fire box office smash
Shipping container hotels: Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Spending the night in a shipping container doesn't sound appealing, but these mobile crash pads are popping up at the summer's biggest events
Native American headdresses are not fashion accessories

Feather dust-up

A Canadian festival has banned Native American headwear. Haven't we been here before?
Boris Johnson's war on diesel

Boris Johnson's war on diesel

11m cars here run on diesel. It's seen as a greener alternative to unleaded petrol. So why is London's mayor on a crusade against the black pump?
5 best waterproof cameras

Splash and flash: 5 best waterproof cameras

Don't let water stop you taking snaps with one of these machines that will take you from the sand to meters deep
Louis van Gaal interview: Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era

Louis van Gaal interview

Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era
Will Gore: The goodwill shown by fans towards Alastair Cook will evaporate rapidly if India win the series

Will Gore: Outside Edge

The goodwill shown by fans towards Alastair Cook will evaporate rapidly if India win the series
The children were playing in the street with toy guns. The air strikes were tragically real

The air strikes were tragically real

The children were playing in the street with toy guns
Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite – The British, as others see us

Britain as others see us

Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite
How did our legends really begin?

How did our legends really begin?

Applying the theory of evolution to the world's many mythologies
Watch out: Lambrusco is back on the menu

Lambrusco is back on the menu

Naff Seventies corner-shop staple is this year's Aperol Spritz