Arts and Entertainment

From 18th-century caricaturists to Desperate Dan, the art of talking in picture-form has a long and (mostly) distinguished history

First get a decent script

Strap to come herecome herecome herecome here

Now is the time for official heroes to come to the aid of the party

NICHOLAS TATE thinks that heroes should be brought back to English history. Pupils need them for a sense of their national past, he said last week. He accused teachers of neglecting Alfred the Great, Nelson, Livingstone and Florence Nightingale, in a conspiracy to stop "the transmission of an established account of the past" and substitute "our brave new world of relativism and deconstruction".

Greeks recoil from the rise of Mimi

Papandreou's plan to instal his wife in parliament has angered his supporters. Andrew Gumbel reports from Athens

Crowning glories may go abroad

For sale: three British Crown frames dating from the coronation of King George I in 1715. Coronation bible of "Mad" King George III also available. Total asking price pounds 1.7m. Might suit avid Royalist or lottery winner with delusions of grandeur

It's a girl - after 200 years of trying

It's a girl - after 200 years of trying

Time running out for rare Bible

MARIANNE MACDONALD

LETTER : Commemorating the millennium

From Dr Richard D Ryder

BOOKS: GOING APE OVER INSECTS

A weighty new biography shows Charles Darwin in a 'chaos of

Lock of Charles I's hair sells for £3,910

BY MARIANNE MACDONALD

Newt 'n' John cannot sing in tune

If there is a British political leader who has something to learn from Gingrich, it is not Major January's flavour of the month is by now not far short of the bozo of the year

Emily's list: a quick Pepys

Radio

BOOK REVIEW / The actress, the prince and a comedy of errors: 'Mrs Jordan's Profession' - Claire Tomalin: Viking, 17 pounds

DORA JORDAN was the greatest comic actress of her day. In the mid-1780s, while the majestic Sarah Siddons reigned over British theatre as queen of tragedy, a lively young Irish girl, only six years Siddons's junior and also from a poor acting family, was beginning to attract attention in the north of England; within a very short time, she was equally famous. And while the playwright Richard Sheridan rudely said of Mrs Siddons that he would 'as soon think of making love to the Archbishop of Canterbury', audiences fell instantly in love with Mrs Jordan for her sweet, friendly, bubbly sexiness - and terrific legs. Claire Tomalin's intelligent, finely made and wonderfully readable new biography not only brings to life a remarkable character and unusual talent, but also provides us with a whole rich background of English life and society, the theatre and its workings, the position of women, especially actresses, and (topically enough) the perils of falling in love with a Royal prince.

Sale of historic letters in archive fetches 850,000 pounds: Marianne Macdonald reports on the break-up of an important correspondence collection

ONE of Britain's most important private archives, containing royal letters detailing the madness of George III, Lord Byron's account of his pursuit by Lady Caroline Lamb, and a grovelling note of thanks from George Washington, was broken up yesterday.

BEST-SELLERS / Top 10 Longest-Serving Monarchs

----------------------------------------------------------------- TOP 10 LONGEST-SERVING MONARCHS ----------------------------------------------------------------- 1 Victoria (1837-1901). . . . . . . . .64 years 2 George III (1760-1820). . . . . . . .60 3 Henry III (1216-1272). . . . . . . . 56 4 Edward III (1327-1377). . . . . . . .50 5 Elizabeth I (1558-1603). . . . . . . 45 6 Elizabeth II (1952-). . . . . . . . .42 7 Henry VI (1422-1461,1470-1). . . . . 40 8 Henry VIII (1509-1547). . . . . . . .38 9 Egbert (802-839). . . . . . . . . . .37 10 Aethelred II (979-1013,1014-1016). . 36 -----------------------------------------------------------------

Debate that has lasted for centuries: James Fergusson, Obituaries Editor, looks at the controversial history of the epitaph, which has long been subject to scrutiny several reports that the wording of epitaphs has always been subject to scrutiny

THE REV Stephen Brian is no lone voice in his campaign for the straight epitaph, nor has the 20th century any monopoly of graveyard correctness. The subject of graveyard inscriptions has been controversial ever since the language of death changed from Latin to the vernacular.
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