The Lost Child, By Julie Myerson

Early on in Julie Myerson's new book, she describes what the textbooks call an "intervention". "You get a whole crowd of people, relatives or friends who really care about your child, people who have been part of his life, to tell him he needs to go to rehab. But it has to be a surprise ..." As interventions go, The Lost Child has been pretty startling. A whole crowd of people – relatives, friends, Newsnight, the Daily Mail – has cornered Myerson's family to tell them what they think. Bloomsbury has rushed the book to publication. Hardly anyone in the country seems not to have an opinion about whether or not Myerson's child needs to go to rehab. It's been a surprise, all right.

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