Arts and Entertainment

A definitive compendium on the revered institution that is the National Theatre

David Lister: Get off screen and into the provinces

There's a small revolution taking place in the British arts scene at the moment. Our national powerhouses are filming some of their productions and releasing the "movies" in cinemas across the country. The Royal Opera House has been experimenting with this for a little while now, but this year it will be doing it with a vengeance, bringing at least six operas and ballets, not just to the art-house cinemas but also to the multiplexes.

First person: 'I went from slob to marathon man'

Rory Coleman, 46

<a href="http://martinking.livejournal.com/1336.html">Marathon Man: Drivers, you're round the bend</a>

Drivers: you're idiots. Murderous, stupid, criminal cretins. Not all of you, I know. Not all of the time, maybe. But there is one particular driving fault that I can vouch affects most of you, most of the time.

<a href="http://martinking.livejournal.com/1203.html">Marathon Man: With a little help from the gizmo</a>

OK, I know part of the aim to enter the London Marathon was to get off my backside, leave the computer screens behind and hit the road. But all those years with the geeks left me feeling the need for a bit of techie assistance.

Modern miss: Hattie Morahan is ditching bonnets in favour of cutting-edge theatre work

When Hattie Morahan played the dowdy, sensible Elinor Dashwood in Andrew Davies' adaptation of Sense and Sensibility, the television critics lavished her with fulsome praise worthy of a love letter penned by Mr Ferrars himself. Her "winningly unshowy performance" was described as both "luminous" and "exceptional". "As good a piece of acting as you're going to see this year" declared one review – a particularly bold claim given that it had screened on 1 January. Even Davies, who had apparently objected to her casting, declared that he had "fallen in love with her performance".

A cold, bitter, vindictive, swindling bully? Surely not, Gordon...

The PM is intense, and by God he can brood to Olympic levels, but we must hope the comparisons with Heathcliff cease there. For the latter is one of the nastiest pieces of work in literature. He may have been impersonated on screen by beetle-browed hunks from Laurence Olivier to Ralph Fiennes, but he's still a 24-carat bastard.

The Week In Radio: When Joan opened for The Rolling Stones

God bless Joan Rivers. Last month, the 75-year-old gargoyle with the rapier tongue suffered the indignity of being booted off ITV's anodyne chat show, Loose Women, for letting loose a volley of expletives. Did the producers not realise that this is Rivers' shtick – and has been for the last 40 years? In any case, the incident made her a particularly delicious choice to present Ed Sullivan and the Gateway to America (BBC Radio 2, Tuesday), a documentary about the censorious TV host who ruled the Sunday-night ratings for 23 years.

Charlton Heston: Iconic film actor who played Moses in 'The Ten Commandments' and won an Oscar for 'Ben-Hur'

Charlton Heston was one of the iconic film stars of the 20th century, a tall, rugged actor with patrician features who became associated with epic spectacles in which he played historical or biblical figures of influence and authority. He was Moses in The Ten Commandments, won an Oscar for the title role in Ben-Hur, and also played El Cid, John the Baptist, Michelangelo, General Gordon and Mark Antony. He did notable work too in such thrillers as the films noirs Dark City and Touch of Evil, the western Will Penny and the cult sci-fi movies Planet of the Apes and The Omega Man.

Judgement at Nuremburg

Directed by Stanley Kramer

Battle of Britain

Directed by Guy Hamilton

Going as Far as I Can, by Duncan Fallowell

An epicure goes to New Zealand

Roy Scheider: Actor best known as Police Chief Brody in the blockbuster 'Jaws'

Lean faced and sinewy, the versatile actor Roy Scheider reached his career peak in the Seventies, when he received two Oscar nominations, as best supporting actor for his role as police partner to "Popeye" Doyle (Gene Hackman) in The French Connection (1971), and as best actor for his uncompromising performance in Bob Fosse's autobiographical All That Jazz (1979).

What's inspiring the Noël Coward renaissance?

After falling out of fashion, No&euml;l Coward's work is reaching a whole new set of admirers. By Ciar Byrne

The rise and fall and rise again of the Hammer House of Horror

The homegrown blend of Victorian melodrama and gothic is back

Sonia Deol: My Life In Media

Sonia Deol, 32, is the BBC Asian Network's breakfast presenter, having taken over the show last month. The station began life in 1976, as a show on BBC Radio Leicester, before broadening its reach across the Midlands. Deol joined the station a decade ago, before it went national in 2002. Earlier this year, the BBC announced an extra &#163;1m of funding for the network, which broadcasts in English and South Asian languages, in an effort to make British- Asian interests "a mainstream part of the corporation's output". Deol has just moved from London back to Edgbaston in Birmingham, where she grew up.
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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee