Slumdog to stardom: How Freida Pinto has adapted to the demands of fame

In just three years, Freida Pinto has turned from 'Slumdog' neopphyte into one of Hollywood's hottest properties, witha starring role in the new 'Planet of the Apes' reboot. But, she reveals to Sam Peters, she was more than happy to shoot her latest film back in India

On the road again: A cinematic version of The Trip has set the US talking

Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon's TV comedy travelogue has made stars of the bickering duo, says Sarah Hughes

Mystery man: Key collaborators on Terrence Malick's latest film discuss the invisible filmmaker

Terrence Malick is the invisible filmmaker. He never gives interviews and refuses to have his picture taken. Inevitably, this has created an air of mystery around him. There is a suspicion that he must be a Stanley Kubrick-like recluse: an eccentric visionary with strange foibles. However, speak to key collaborators on his most recent film, The Tree of Life (which won the Palme d'Or in Cannes and is released in the UK tomorrow), and what is immediately apparent is the affection in which he is held, and the eagerness that top technicians and actors all have to work with him.

Roddy Doyle: Family matters – and an old soul classic

Roddy Doyle is planning a stage musical of The Commitments, he tells James Mottram. But first he's revisiting another hit

Anthony Wiener: A Cock and Bull Story

Congressman Anthony Wiener held a press conference yesterday morning to admit he sent a picture of his boxered penis to a myriad of tweeting young women, and then lied about it in almost every news medium.

13 Assassins, Takashi Miike, 126 mins (15)

A blackly mischievous samurai study revels in spectacular slaughter but strikes a sombre note amid the bloodshed

Sam Riley: From Joy Division to Brighton Rock

He had a breakdown at school before cutting his teeth as Mark E Smith and making his name as Joy Division's Ian Curtis. Now Sam Riley is taking on Brighton Rock's psychotic Pinkie and Jack Kerouac's alter ego

DVD: The Trip (15)

"Desperate to be taken seriously aren't you?" Rob Brydon wryly points out to Steve Coogan in Michael Winterbottom's sublime mid-life crisis comedy, which is a boozy, barbed blend of Sideways, Withnail and I and Curb Your Enthusiasm (the story is fictional but based around their real personas).

The Little House, ITV1, Monday<br/>The Trip, BBC2, Monday

Francesca Annis conveys menace bordering on horror in a breathless thriller

DVD: The Killer Inside Me (18)

Adapted from Jim Thompson's 1952 novel of the same name, The Killer Inside Me follows Deputy Sheriff Lou Ford (superbly played by Casey Affleck), a reliable member of the small Texan town community who hides a dark secret, which slowly reveals itself.

What Casey did next: the insider at Hollywood's dark heart

After starring in The Killer Inside Me, Casey Affleck made a documentary about Joaquin Phoenix. He talks fame, family and debauchery with James Mottram

Steve Coogan returns with new comic creation - himself

Funnyman Steve Coogan is to return to TV with a new comic creation - himself.

Coogan to perform Chekhov for dramatist's anniversary

The creator of such erudite characters as the Mancunian cultural icons Paul and Pauline Calf is to further test the range of his acting talent by performing the work of Anton Chekhov in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the birth of the Russian writer and dramatist.

John Walsh: A film fails if the viewer turns away

I don't know when a mainstream film sparked off so much argument as The Killer Inside Me, the noir thriller by Michael Winterbottom. I've had so many heated conversations about it, my head is spinning. The film, as you must surely have read, features two scenes in which women (played by Jessica Alba and Kate Hudson) are viciously attacked out of the blue by the baby-faced, castrato-voiced, faux -charming cop, played by Casey Affleck, with whom they've become sexually involved. The violence is extremely graphic, relentless, shocking and hard to watch; but should we criticise Winterbottom for the extreme quality of his depiction? If he were depicting an earthquake, wouldn't we applaud him for making it as graphic and bone-rattling as he, and the sophisticated resources of a film studio, can make it? Isn't there a post-feminist case, that the more realistically you portray violence against women, the more you'll show complacent people how disgusting it is?

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