Perfect culture for a 'superbug'

A killer bacterium resistant to antibiotics is haunting hospitals. Now doctors fear MRSA may spread into the community, says Liz Hunt

Scientists find new life, but not as we know it

Scientists may be on the verge of discovering a wholly new type of life- form, entirely distinct from the three main groups that are believed to populate the Earth at present.

Some like it hotter

microbe of the month; Many bacteria thrive in extreme conditions, writes Bernard Dixon

Alarm grows over genetic 'dynamite'

NICHOLAS SCHOON

They can take the heat - are they in the kitchen?

Pasteurisation does not always kill bacteria. But fear not, your pinta is probably safe, says Bernard Dixon; microbe of the month: Escherichia coli

A new world under the lobster's nose

The discovery of Symbion pandora teaches us the enormity of our ignorance, says Colin Tudge

HEALTH: They're cold and dirty

Anyone due for a medical examination would be well advised to steer clear of their doctor's stethoscope. If British doctors are anything like their US counterparts, it will probably harbour all kinds of bacteria. A study of 150 staff in a Michigan Hospital, published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, found that while doctors and nurses regularly washed their hands, they were not so careful about their stethoscopes - almost 6 per cent said they had never been cleaned at all. Almost every stethoscope examined contained bacteria, while one in five were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus, which can cause serious

Yorkshire water bug

Yorkshire water bug

Daughter was close to death

Sally Allen's intuitive decision to check on her three-year-old daughter Nikita saved the girl from choking on her own vomit. Nikita, who has a hole in her heart, had suffered a convulsion brought on after being infected by cryptosporidium, writes Michael Prestage.

Plea to check 'infected' plant was refused

Poisoned water: Utility accused of negligence as 400 customers fall sick in outbreak similar to one in 1992

microbe of the month: Williopsis mrakii

A beast of a yeast could banish thrush and other fungal growths, writes Bernard Dixon

microbe of the month: Clod

A virulent pathogen is bringing speedy destruction to the world's fragile and slow-growing coral reefs. Bernard Dixon reports

Amber bee eclipses `Jurassic Park' fiction

BY STEVE CONNOR
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

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After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
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Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

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Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

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An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

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The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent