Noel Clarke

Noel Clarke interview

From a TV obsessed only child growing up on a council estate in North Kensington, Noel Clarke has forged a career as an actor/director/producer, and crossed the tracks to posh South Kensington

Bridesmaids, Paul Feig, 124 mins (15)

It's got the rudery and crudery, but this is also a sassy, smart comedy where the women are competent and it's the sugared almonds that get skewered

James Corden: The History Boy who grew up

James Corden has come a long way since the play that made his name. Now back at the National Theatre, the Gavin & Stacey star talks fame, flops and fatherhood with Alice Jones

Marie-France Pisier: Actress and screenwriter noted for her work with

Elegant, poised, with beautiful green eyes and a singular, sensual voice, Marie-France Pisier was one of France's best loved actresses, admired as much for her feminist and political beliefs as for a career that spanned 50 years and as many films. She worked with some of her country's most celebrated auteurs, including Jacques Rivette, the novelist and film-maker Alain Robbe-Grillet, and most famously with François Truffaut, who cast her as Colette Tazzi, the first love of Antoine Doinel, his filmic alter-ego, portrayed by Jean-Pierre Léaud. She made her debut as the haughty Colette in Antoine Et Colette, a 30-minute segment included in the 1962 omnibus film L'Amour à 20 Ans (Love At Twenty), the second instalment of Doinel's progress from childhood to middle age, had a cameo in the third, Baisers Volés (Stolen Kisses), in 1968, and returned 11 years later in the last of the five Doinel pictures, L'Amour En Fuite (Love On The Run), which she co-wrote with Truffaut.

Diary: Tina Fey laughs off troll slur

Tina Fey is expecting. First, a baby – her second, with husband, the composer and producer Jeff Richmond – but also further series of 30 Rock, contrary to reports, and despite the imminent departure of Alec Baldwin. If that weren't enough, there's also the publication of Bossypants, her book of autobiographical essays, for which the first US reviews are already in ("extremely funny", New York Times). Fey is most famous here for her uncanny impression of Sarah Palin during the 2008 US election. Palin may give her some well-earned time off by avoiding the 2012 race, but Fey would also be well suited to satirising Tea Party-approved potential candidate Michele Bachmann. Adored by one half of America, Fey's "Palin" earned her the ire of the other half. "Tina Fey is an ugly, pear-shaped, bitchy, over-rated troll," wrote one (probably Republican) web commenter, recalls Fey in her book. "To say I'm an overrated troll," she retorts, "when you have never even seen me guard a bridge, is patently unfair."

Double trouble for Portman

Like most winners of the Best Actress Oscar, Natalie Portman devoted a huge proportion of her victory speech in February to a series of tearful thank you messages to the people who she believed had helped on the long journey to the summit of her profession.

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Claire Foy: 'I've surprised myself by not behaving like a massive

I want to be an actress not a celebrity I don't want to get involved with that whole circuit, it's not me. I've been to a couple of red-carpet events; everyone's taking your photo, and you know one person there. It feels strange, like arriving at a party with no friends in sight. Why would you do that?