Arts and Entertainment A scene from the film Storage 24 that grossed $72 at the US box office

The film made less than £50 after being on release for a week

Suspected of being a Soviet spy – the man who created Dr. No

As the writer who brought James Bond to life on the big screen, Wolf Mankowitz was well versed in the skulduggery of the British intelligence services. What he did not know was that MI5 returned the favour by investigating him for more than a decade as a suspected Soviet spy.

The Last Airbender, M Night Shyamalan, 103 mins (PG)

Derivative plot, feeble characters, clunking dialogue, embarrassingly bad 3D special effects – M Night Shyamalan is at it again with his latest fantasy adventure

The Last Airbender In 3D (PG)

It comes as an anticlimax that M Night Shyamalan's much reviled fantasy epic isn't quite as bad as the more bilious US reviewers had suggested.

Suso Cecchi D'Amico: Screenwriter for De Sica and Visconti who also worked with Wyler, Zeffirelli and Jarman

Suso Cecchi D'Amico was Italy's most illustrious screenwriter; she contributed to classic films such as Bicycle Thieves and The Leopard, and collaborated with some of Italy's most distinguished directors, among them Antonioni, De Sica and Monicelli. She had a particularly rewarding association with Luchino Visconti, for whom she was a major scriptwriter on almost all his films from Bellissima (1951) to The Innocent (1976).

Knight and Day, James Mangold, 110 mins (12A)

We are meant to be dazzled by the sophisticated locations and baffled by the plot, but the real mystery is why anyone bothered

Tom Mankiewicz: Screenwriter and director whose witty scripts revitalised the James Bond franchise

Tom Mankiewicz was a screenwriter who made important contributions to several James Bond films, particularly Diamonds Are Forever (1971), the script of which coaxed Sean Connery to play Bond again after a brief "retirement" from the role, plus Live and Let Die (1973), which was Roger Moore's first venture as Bond, and The Man with the Golden Gun (1974). He also made a decided if controversial contribution to the success of the first two Superman movies, and he wrote the pilot show for the television series Hart to Hart, directing several episodes. He was much in demand as a "script doctor", called in to add character and humour to moribund screenplays – he once described himself as similar to a hired gunslinger, though he said the work was thankless: "If the film flops, you're accused of messing up someone else's script; if it succeeds, somebody else walks away with the Oscar." The director of Superman, Richard Donner, called him "one of the great storytellers of our industry".

Classics lost and found: Authors pick the modern classic they would like to revive

As novels of the past return as bestsellers, great old books please keen new readers.

Boyd Tonkin: Strangled and stifled by red tape

The week in books

Radcliffe returns in Hammer horror after completing final Potter movie

Daniel Radcliffe is to appear in a movie version of Susan Hill's best-selling Gothic horror novel The Woman In Black, made by the famed Hammer studios. It will be his first major role since completing work on the seventh and final Harry Potter film.

DJ Taylor: The art of self-promotion

Compare and contrast Lord Mandelson's bells-and-whistles publicity drive with the no-fuss approach to stardom shown by movie actress Penelope Cruz

Imperial Bedrooms, By Bret Easton Ellis

The most revelatory moment in Bret Easton Ellis's debut novel, Less Than Zero, published 25 years ago, comes pages before the end. It offers the reader a rare glimpse into the narrator's otherwise hermetically sealed inner life. Clay, a jaded 20-something living on the fringes of Hollywood, alongside like-minded children of privilege already bloated on LA's excesses, is confronted by his girlfriend about whether he has ever really cared. "I don't want to care. If I care about things, it'll just be worse, it'll just be another thing to think about. It's less painful if I don't care."

Diary: Long dark M Night of the soul

M Night Shyamalan must have thought he'd endured the worst reviews of his career for his 2006 movie, Lady in the Water ("This cloying piece of claptrap sets a high-water mark for pomposity, condescension, false profundity and true turgidity" – Wall Street Journal). But it looks like his latest, the unfortunately-named fantasy The Last Airbender, may yet outdo its predecessor. Early reviews include those by the estimable Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times (" The Last Airbender is an agonising experience in every category I can think of and others still waiting to be invented") and AO Scott of The New York Times (" The Last Airbender? Let's hope so").

Simon Usborne: Cycle 'superhighways' looking, well, a bit rubbish

They were billed as the answer to the battle for London’s streets raging between motorists and riders

Arts and Entertainment
books
Voices
Caustic she may be, but Joan Rivers is a feminist hero, whether she likes it or not
voicesShe's an inspiration, whether she likes it or not, says Ellen E Jones
Arts and Entertainment
The Doctor and the Dalek meet
tvReview: Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Sport
Diego Costa
footballEverton 3 Chelsea 6: Diego Costa double has manager purring
Life and Style
3D printed bump keys can access almost any lock
techSoftware needs photo of lock and not much more
Arts and Entertainment
The 'three chords and the truth gal' performing at the Cornbury Music Festival, Oxford, earlier this summer
music... so how did she become country music's hottest new star?
Life and Style
The spy mistress-general: A lecturer in nutritional therapy in her modern life, Heather Rosa favours a Byzantine look topped off with a squid and a schooner
fashionEurope's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln
News
Dr Alice Roberts in front of a
peopleAlice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
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Star turns: Montacute House
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor
She's dark, sarcastic, and bashes life in Nowheresville ... so how did Kacey Musgraves become country music's hottest new star?

Kacey Musgraves: Nashville's hottest new star

The singer has two Grammys for her first album under her belt and her celebrity fans include Willie Nelson, Ryan Adams and Katy Perry
American soldier-poet Brian Turner reveals the enduring turmoil that inspired his memoir

Soldier-poet Brian Turner on his new memoir

James Kidd meets the prize-winning writer, whose new memoir takes him back to the bloody battles he fought in Iraq
Aston Villa vs Hull match preview: Villa were not surprised that Ron Vlaar was a World Cup star

Villa were not surprised that Vlaar was a World Cup star

Andi Weimann reveals just how good his Dutch teammate really is
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef ekes out his holiday in Italy with divine, simple salads

Bill Granger's simple Italian salads

Our chef presents his own version of Italian dishes, taking in the flavours and produce that inspired him while he was in the country
The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

If supporters begin to close bank accounts, switch broadband suppliers or shun satellite sales, their voices will be heard. It’s time for revolution