Arts and Entertainment

Viennese noir... with red tinges

Film: Greatness lies in what is lost

As 'The Magnificent Ambersons' returns, David Thomson considers the remains of Orson Welles's masterpiece

South Bank salvation

With all the dreadful films that are traditionally shown on television at this time of year, the only solution for many is a Christmas trip to the NFT

Interview: The classics mangled by the studio janitor

The cinematic clash between the `philistine' studio boss and the sensitive director has left many films lying mutilated in the editing suite, or even melted down for their silver content. Chris Darke looks at attempts to find and restore some mauled classics.

A crime against expectations

How suddenly stereotypes change. Among countries, Britain was the ageing aristocrat fallen upon hard times - decent and law-abiding but fundamentally exhausted, an object of curiosity, sympathy even, as it slipped gently into history's twilight. No longer. Our dynamic economy, our vigorous new government are said to be the envy of all. But, it seems, we are also world-beaters in a less flattering sense.

Film: CRITIC'S CHOICE

1. Scream

The price of free speech

Also Showing

Through everything, the one quick look reigns supreme

You fall in love 20 times before you get to work. Walking down the street, on the bus, crushed on the dank, sweaty Tube, you fall. Fall for faces that you'll never glimpse again, for names you don't know and will never know, fall for men who probably fall those 20 times as regularly and as redundantly as you, every day, every week, every month of the year, and who will have forgotten that falling in love before their first cup of coffee, if they have not forgotten well before. And all because of just one look.

The awesome Welles

ROSEBUD: The Story of Orson Welles by David Thomson, Little, Brown pounds 20ROSEBUD: The Story of Orson Welles by David Thomson, Little, Brown pounds 20

THE OSCAR BOX

Which was the most absurd Oscar ever awarded?

My life as a film

Oliver Stone's Nixon is a reminder that a biopic can be many things: psychodrama, pastiche, caper, epic. What makes a life into a story worth telling? By Kevin Jackson

When Hearst met Welles

first encounters: Illustration by Edward Sorel Text by Nancy Caldwell Sorel Next week: Captain John Smith and Pocahontas;

BOOKS: CRACKS IN THE MIRROR

The legend and the lifetime: the first part of a new biography of Orson Welles debunks some old myths surrounding the man

CAPTAIN MOONLIGHT:THE LIST

FALSE ALARMS: Columbus was told he'd fall off the edge of the world in 1492, but didn't; Mary I, daughter of Henry VIII, was "pregnant" for many months by Philip II but died childless in 1558; in 1678 Titus Oates concocted a story of a "Popish plo t" which led to the murder and persecution of many Catholics; the fictional news flash that Martians had landed, at the beginning of Orson Welles's War of the Worlds led to panic in the US when it was broadcast in 1938; The Protocols of Zion outlined a J ewishplot to take over the world but were exposed as a forgery in 1921; the White Brotherhood waited in vain for the end of the world in Kiev in 1993; an Australian television technician working at Sky in 1993 saw a practice news flash that the Queen Mo therwas dead, and told his mum who told the world; a Moscow news agency reported last week that Russian air defences had shot down a "missile" - it was a Norwegian research rocket and it wasn't shot down.

Citizen Kane: the `Antiques Roadshow' years

The revelation that there is now a collectors market in McDonald's ephemera is one of those facts that manages to combine shock and inevitability. You can't be serious . . . well, of course. Because the truth is that the collecting virus has only ever had a coincidental connection with discrimination or taste; it doesn't require beauty to thrive, just a minimal durability and relative scarcity. In Darwinian terms it is beautifully adapted as a parasite; each addition to the collection consolidate s its grip on the host organism, becomes a further reason to collect some more.

Director's Cut: Every shadow tells a story: Michael Winner on the eccentricity, boldness and Hitchcockian surprises of The Third Man

I first saw The Third Man as a child, and it was rather like a religious person seeing God. First of all, the popular films of the time, as they are now, were American. The British didn't often come out with anything you particularly wanted to see. And the whole spirit of the film and the photography and the acting and the plot were so perfect. If people tell me: 'I want to be a film director,' I say, 'You don't need to go to film school. Just watch The Third Man 100 times.'
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
A new Russian revolution: Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc

A new Russian revolution

Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc
Eugene de Kock: Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

The debate rages in South Africa over whether Eugene de Kock should ever be released from jail
Standing my ground: If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?

Standing my ground

If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?
Commonwealth Games 2014: Dai Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

Welsh hurdler was World, European and Commonwealth champion, but then the injuries crept in
Israel-Gaza conflict: Secret report helps Israelis to hide facts

Patrick Cockburn: Secret report helps Israel to hide facts

The slickness of Israel's spokesmen is rooted in directions set down by pollster Frank Luntz
The man who dared to go on holiday

The man who dared to go on holiday

New York's mayor has taken a vacation - in a nation that has still to enforce paid leave, it caused quite a stir, reports Rupert Cornwell
Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business, from Sarah Millican to Marcus Brigstocke

Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business

For all those wanting to know how stand-ups keep standing, here are some of the best moments
The Guest List 2014: Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks

The Guest List 2014

Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks
Jokes on Hollywood: 'With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on'

Jokes on Hollywood

With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on
It's the best of British art... but not all is on display

It's the best of British art... but not all is on display

Voted for by the British public, the artworks on Art Everywhere posters may be the only place where they can be seen
Critic claims 'I was the inspiration for Blanche DuBois'

Critic claims 'I was the inspiration for Blanche DuBois'

Blanche Marvin reveals how Tennessee Williams used her name and an off-the-cuff remark to create an iconic character
Sometimes it's hard to be a literary novelist

Sometimes it's hard to be a literary novelist

Websites offering your ebooks for nothing is only the latest disrespect the modern writer is subjected to, says DJ Taylor
Edinburgh Fringe 2014: The comedy highlights, from Bridget Christie to Jack Dee

Edinburgh Fringe 2014

The comedy highlights, from Bridget Christie to Jack Dee
Dame Jenny Abramsky: 'We have to rethink. If not, museums and parks will close'

Dame Jenny Abramsky: 'We have to rethink. If not, museums and parks will close'

The woman stepping down as chair of the Heritage Lottery Fund is worried