News Dave Lee Travis arrives at Southwark Crown Court in London on Wednesday for the second day of his trial.

A radio announcer has told the court in the trial of DJ Dave Lee Travis that she was in a “panic” after he allegedly grabbed her breasts when she was speaking live on air.

Oper Opis, Barbican Theatre, London<br/>The Snow Queen, Coliseum, London

After an opening that is, literally, well balanced, a Swiss collaboration descends into a free-for-all

The eyes have it: London puts its mime face on

Performers with chalky complexions and staring eyes bring a veritable dose of normality to stages across the capital this week, as the London Mime Festival treats theatregoers to eclectic experiences that include singing badger skulls, a mountain goat and an ode to bearded ladies.

David Lister: Prince Charming turns panto villain

There was a story reported this week which must surely make a footnote in theatrical history.

First Impressions: The Moonstone, Wilkie Collins (1868)

Mr Wilkie Collins's new book is very suggestive of a game called "button", which children used to play.

Pat Keysell: Innovative signer who made her name presenting 'Vision On'

At the height of public-service broadcasting in Britain, Pat Keysell introduced a generation of deaf and hard-of-hearing children to television in Vision On, the first programme successfully to bridge the gap between those groups and hearing viewers. The innovative presenter, who had studied mime at drama school, combined sign language and speech in a show that originally featured magicians, jugglers and mime artists.

Terence Blacker: Losing faith in the story of the moral

In our nervous age, fiction is mistrusted and seems to lack relevance

Strauss Der Rosenkavalier, Royal Opera House, London

John Schlesinger’s venerable 1984 staging of Strauss’ Der Rosenkavalier slips ever more ungraciously into the realms of regional pantomime.

James Moore: Water boys the winners with Ofwat?

Outlook Northumbrian Water's response to Ofwat's final decision on how much it can squeeze out of its customers over the next five years was a really quite outstanding piece of corporate verbal diarrhoea which said absolutely nothing.

Cecilia Bartoli/Il Giardino Armonico, Barbican Hall

Cecilia Bartoli’s latest album and road show – "Sacrificium – La scuola dei castrati" – comes courtesy of an era characterised by the unkindest cuts of all. The composers' names are all but forgotten but those of the genitally compromised superstars are not. We have heard only simulations of the kind of sound these surgically adjusted males could produce but from all the documentary evidence it was bigger and more pungent than the undeniably engaging Bartoli is apt to produce. But where she does share a certain kinship with the castrati is in her ability to make a three-course meal of second-rate music. The album, the concert, was choc full of it.

Raoul, Barbican, London

Doubtless the people who applauded James Thiérrée loud and long would award him more stars than I. But would these be given out of delight or duty? For though the audience laughed as Thiérrée mimed his way through 75 winsome minutes, the laughs were scattered and never so full-bodied as to make the clapping a logical outcome

Ong Bak: The beginning, Tony Jaa, Panna Rittikrai, 98 mins, (15)

Starring Tony Jaa, Sorapong Chatree

Pamela Anderson joins pantomime cast

Former Baywatch star Pamela Anderson will make her pantomime debut in a production of Aladdin this Christmas.

Guy Adams: 'I told the truth!' - Michael Jackson's doctor breaks his silence

Two months into the real-life soap-opera surrounding Michael Jackson’s death, the pantomime villain of the piece has finally broken his silence.

DVD review: Psychoville (15), Matt Lipsey, 200 mins

It's incredible what a lick of face-paint will achieve – Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton bring their chameleonic skills to this odd tale of blackmail.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine