News Dave Lee Travis arrives at Southwark Crown Court in London on Wednesday for the second day of his trial.

A radio announcer has told the court in the trial of DJ Dave Lee Travis that she was in a “panic” after he allegedly grabbed her breasts when she was speaking live on air.

The Ring Cycle: What on earth was Wagner on?

As a new Ring opens, John Walsh tries to get to grips with its fantastical plot

All Points North, By Simon Armitage

Armitage's northern rag-bag is an entertaining excursion through both memory and landscape. Armitage is better at being a poet than a probation officer (after rushing a baby to hospital with a suspected cigarette burn, a doctor pointed out "That's his nipple"), though his career switch was not without drawbacks.

Telstar, Nick Moran, 118 mins, (15)

The story of Sixties pop producer Joe Meek and his north London hit factory is told not as tragedy, but as farce

Steve Richards: A cloth-eared Prime Minister and a pantomime of disunity

Such clumsy handling of the Iraq war inquiry reveals the bewildered weakness of Brown

Morrissey, Albert Halls, Stirling

Something's exploded," quipped Morrissey in response to some minor onstage technical crisis, "and it's not my emotions, for once." There followed a Moriartyish cackle, a jagged "ha!" of the kind reserved for pantomime villains. It's a brave soul who would describe Britain's favourite revenant miserablist in such a fashion, but he clearly enjoys his current role of potentially combustible anti-hero.

Monsieur Hulot's holiday is over

Jacques Tati may be dead, but his greatest creation is returning with a starring role at Cannes and a new animated adventure.

The Gone-Away World, By Nick Harkaway

Debut novelist Nick Harkaway, son of John Le Carré, shares none of his father's Cold War cool, though he has created his own alternative universe.

Death of a Scientist, Oran Mor, Glasgow

Dr David Kelly, the Iraq weapons expert who has become a kind of political fable, has been at the centre of a play, a television drama and now an opera. The husband and wife team of Zinnie and John Harris, writer and composer respectively, have created a 15-minute operatic snapshot Death of a Scientist as part of Scottish Opera's series of bite-sized pieces of new music-theatre, Five:15.

Les Sept Planches de la Ruse, Barbican Theatre, London

The "sept planches" are the seven pieces of the Chinese game Tangram, a set of geometrical shapes that can be arranged into different patterns. This show uses giant versions of the pieces – big enough for performers to clamber up, around and inside, holding balances or sliding down angles. Shapes unfold with peaceful grace and dashes of comedy.

Album: Rameau, La Pantomime - Sempé/Fortin, (Paradizo)

If one harpsichord sounds like "two skeletons copulating on a tin roof", this is a veritable orgy.

Johann Hari: Do we want a democracy or a pantomime?

The next general election is hurtling towards us with the force of a damp sponge. We have, at most, 20 months until Decision Day– but who expects there to be a great fizzing debate? Who thinks we, the people, will have a chance to dig deep into our country's problems and tell our leaders how to put them right? Nobody. Instead it will be like an X-Factor final in a bad, bad year: which empty shell sounds sweetest? It's a bleak thought: in one of the world's oldest democracies, none of us expects democracy to work as it should.

Hansel und Gretel, Glyndebourne Festival, Glyndebourne

In Laurent Pelly's new production of Humperdinck's Hänsel und Gretel, deforestation is already advanced: plastic bags hang from denuded trees, and the ground is strewn with the discarded waste of our overindulgent society.

Last Night's TV: The perils of friends in high places

The World's Tallest Woman and Me, Channel 4; What Happened Next? BBC4

Miles Kington: You can turn anything into a pantomime if you try

The nearest we get to chatting about culture in the pub, usually, is discussing last night's telly. So it came as a bit of a shock when someone said they had been to the theatre the other day. It was the lady with the green/brown hairdo. (She has recently reverted to whisky mac as her favourite winter tipple, and tinted her hair accordingly. Or at least given her coiffeuse some imprecise instructions to tint her hair accordingly.) She had been to Bristol for an evening out.

London International Mime Festival, Barbican Theatre, London<br />Jonathan Burrows/Matteo Fargion, Lilian Baylis Theatre, London

Two unusual shows, the first spectacularly messy, the other obsessively neat, highlight different aspects of the avant garde
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 12 March 2015
The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss