i Theo Paphitis, retail magnate

Has he, God forbid, actually decided to invest in something?

True Gripes: Sloane dangers: Life in SW3 has its ugly side

A year ago, the prospect of living in Chelsea had me all a-quiver. Now I'm moving on, and I shouldn't be sorry if I never saw the King's Road again.

Victims of crime seek an income: Father demands alternative to lump-sum compensation for son handicapped by assault

A FATHER is battling with the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board to persuade it to award his brain-damaged and physically handicapped son an annual income, rather than the one-off lump sum that it normally would pay.

Long Runners / No 25: Just a Minute

Age: 26 (it began in 1967).

How the West was won - by that old Latin tongue

Doc Holliday: In vino veritas

Conrans of counter-culture: Whether it's a bong, a hubble-bubble or exotic Phillies Blunts, Alix Sharkey knows who sells them. Just don't ask what for

The revolution will not be televised, they used to say. But will the counter-culture be sold over the counter? If so, then shops such as Sohi Soho may become the department stores of the New Age.

Letter: Scholars shop around

Sir: Katie Drummond (letter, 13 December) wonders why John Lewis (classicist and next Head Master of Eton) does not link up with Peter Jones (classicist, though not, actually, head of department at Newcastle) in place of King's College, Cambridge. Simple. There is already a nominal connection between the two august institutions. The major classical prize at Eton is called 'the

Letter: Classics in store

Sir: Following the appointment of John Lewis, a classicist, as its headmaster, perhaps Eton should consider renouncing its traditional links with King's College, Cambridge, and opt instead for a partnership with the University of Newcastle, where the head of classics is a certain Peter Jones.

Bunhill: St Michael spreads his wedding wings

WITHIN a few years, up to one in four of the country's newlyweds will be blessed by St Michael. Put more commercially, M&S reckons that up to 100,000 couples a year will be asking friends and relatives to choose their gifts from its computerised wedding list system.

ROCK / Name of the pose

LAST month, Prince announced he was changing his name to but omitted to offer guidelines on pronunciation. We asked for suggestions.

Property: Let's exchange addresses: David Lawson talks to home owners who have successfully swapped houses when conventional selling failed

IF property ownership is the religion of the late 20th century, first-time buyers are its gods. From them all blessings flow - mainly because they start chains that allow everyone else to move. But these gods are not immortal. What happens when they vanish?

INTERIORS / How the Decorators Live: Tangerine Dream: Francois Gilles's mother grew up in Algeria, his grandfather was a bohemian exile in Morocco. In his London flat full of curios, the French designer evokes North Africa without having ransacked it. In the first in a series, Dinah Hall captures the ambience

IT IS really only in the company of interior decorators that you recognise what a disadvantage a solid middle-class upbringing, with decent suburban values and wall-to-wall carpeting, can be in life. If you don't have a way with trimmings, blame it on your parents. It is those early formative tactile experiences, you see. The infantile roots of decorative taste were vividly described by the eccentric decorator/collector Charles Wade in 1945: 'This happy realm of under the table and round the skirtings, how intimate one was with the legs of furniture, textures and patterns of carpets, on friendly terms with grain, cracks and knots of the boards, the underneathness of things never seen by grown-ups.'

RADIO / Filling the unforgiving minute: Martin Kelner on the durable success of a radio programme that just goes on and on and on and on

'HELLO, as the Minute Waltz fades away once again, it's my pleasure to welcome you to Just A Minute, perhaps the most deceptively simple, enduring, popular, and much-copied comedy game on radio. And the subject is: why the longest-running game-show on radio, dismissed by some people 10 - even 20 - years ago as a clapped-out Victorian parlour game, should suddenly have become fashionable. Can you speak on that subject for just one minute without hesitation, repetition, or deviating from the subject on the card, Jonathan James-Moore, Head of BBC Radio Light Entertainment?'

Racing Commentary: Owners switch the onus to value: The people who pay the bills have started to demand more for their money from racecourses and trainers

RACEHORSE owners have at last revealed that they are not just cheque-writing machines, they have voice boxes too and this week they used them. Not that they were speaking in unison - the prime movers were as disparate as two Maktoum brothers and a quarter-shareholder in the Champion Hurdle hope Ruling - but the common cry was that they want more for their money.

RADIO / Only toffs or cockneys need apply

YOU DON'T have to know that Just a Minute (R4) was inspired by a public school punishment to see it as an upper-class parlour game. The hostile levity, the nonchalant way in which the precise score is never given ('Clement Freud is in the lead, just ahead of Derek Nimmo . . .'), the sports day whistle, the clubman's innuendo: all suggest a loosened black tie. The best contestants have been either toffs or cockneys.

Letter: Moving away from the classics

Sir: The National Curriculum Council's report (that the national curriculum is overloaded) will come as no surprise to classicists and other non-national curriculum specialists in state schools, who are being forcibly redeployed by the national curriculum away from their expertise to teach only official state-approved subjects (report, 19 January). If the Government's boasts of the diversity and choice available in our state schools, hollow enough as they are, are not to become a complete sham, it is urgent that the overloading of the Key Stage 3 syllabus (ages 11-14) be reduced, and quickly.
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – Five-star MS Swiss Corona 7 nights from £999pp
Lake Como St Moritz & the Bernina Express 7 nights from £809pp
Vietnam
Lake Maggiore, Orta & the Matterhorn 7 nights from £939pp
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Prices correct as of 19 December 2014
Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history - clocks, rifles, frogmen’s uniforms and colonial helmets

Clocks, rifles, swords, frogmen’s uniforms

Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history
Return to Gaza: Four months on, the wounds left by Israel's bombardment have not yet healed

Four months after the bombardment, Gaza’s wounds are yet to heal

Kim Sengupta is reunited with a man whose plight mirrors the suffering of the Palestinian people
Gastric surgery: Is it really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Is gastric surgery really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Critics argue that it’s crazy to operate on healthy people just to stop them eating
Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction Part 2 - now LIVE

Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction

Bid on original art, or trips of a lifetime to Africa or the 'Corrie' set, and help Homeless Veterans
Pantomime rings the changes to welcome autistic theatre-goers

Autism-friendly theatre

Pantomime leads the pack in quest to welcome all
The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

Sony suffered a chorus of disapproval after it withdrew 'The Interview', but it's not too late for it to take a stand, says Joan Smith
From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?

Panto dames: before and after

From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?
Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Booksellers say readers are turning away from dark modern thrillers and back to the golden age of crime writing
Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best,' says founder of JustGiving

Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best'

Ten million of us have used the JustGiving website to donate to good causes. Its co-founder says that being dynamic is as important as being kind
The botanist who hunts for giant trees at Kew Gardens

The man who hunts giants

A Kew Gardens botanist has found 25 new large tree species - and he's sure there are more out there
The 12 ways of Christmas: Spare a thought for those who will be working to keep others safe during the festive season

The 12 ways of Christmas

We speak to a dozen people who will be working to keep others safe, happy and healthy over the holidays
Birdwatching men have a lot in common with their feathered friends, new study shows

The male exhibits strange behaviour

A new study shows that birdwatching men have a lot in common with their feathered friends...
Diaries of Evelyn Waugh, Virginia Woolf and Noël Coward reveal how they coped with the December blues

Famous diaries: Christmas week in history

Noël Coward parties into the night, Alan Clark bemoans the cost of servants, Evelyn Waugh ponders his drinking…
From noble to narky, the fall of the open letter

From noble to narky, the fall of the open letter

The great tradition of St Paul and Zola reached its nadir with a hungry worker's rant to Russell Brand, says DJ Taylor
A Christmas ghost story by Alison Moore: A prodigal daughter has a breakthrough

A Christmas ghost story by Alison Moore

The story was published earlier this month in 'Poor Souls' Light: Seven Curious Tales'