i Theo Paphitis, retail magnate

Has he, God forbid, actually decided to invest in something?

True Gripes: Sloane dangers: Life in SW3 has its ugly side

A year ago, the prospect of living in Chelsea had me all a-quiver. Now I'm moving on, and I shouldn't be sorry if I never saw the King's Road again.

Victims of crime seek an income: Father demands alternative to lump-sum compensation for son handicapped by assault

A FATHER is battling with the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board to persuade it to award his brain-damaged and physically handicapped son an annual income, rather than the one-off lump sum that it normally would pay.

Long Runners / No 25: Just a Minute

Age: 26 (it began in 1967).

How the West was won - by that old Latin tongue

Doc Holliday: In vino veritas

Conrans of counter-culture: Whether it's a bong, a hubble-bubble or exotic Phillies Blunts, Alix Sharkey knows who sells them. Just don't ask what for

The revolution will not be televised, they used to say. But will the counter-culture be sold over the counter? If so, then shops such as Sohi Soho may become the department stores of the New Age.

Letter: Scholars shop around

Sir: Katie Drummond (letter, 13 December) wonders why John Lewis (classicist and next Head Master of Eton) does not link up with Peter Jones (classicist, though not, actually, head of department at Newcastle) in place of King's College, Cambridge. Simple. There is already a nominal connection between the two august institutions. The major classical prize at Eton is called 'the

Letter: Classics in store

Sir: Following the appointment of John Lewis, a classicist, as its headmaster, perhaps Eton should consider renouncing its traditional links with King's College, Cambridge, and opt instead for a partnership with the University of Newcastle, where the head of classics is a certain Peter Jones.

Bunhill: St Michael spreads his wedding wings

WITHIN a few years, up to one in four of the country's newlyweds will be blessed by St Michael. Put more commercially, M&S reckons that up to 100,000 couples a year will be asking friends and relatives to choose their gifts from its computerised wedding list system.

ROCK / Name of the pose

LAST month, Prince announced he was changing his name to but omitted to offer guidelines on pronunciation. We asked for suggestions.

Property: Let's exchange addresses: David Lawson talks to home owners who have successfully swapped houses when conventional selling failed

IF property ownership is the religion of the late 20th century, first-time buyers are its gods. From them all blessings flow - mainly because they start chains that allow everyone else to move. But these gods are not immortal. What happens when they vanish?

INTERIORS / How the Decorators Live: Tangerine Dream: Francois Gilles's mother grew up in Algeria, his grandfather was a bohemian exile in Morocco. In his London flat full of curios, the French designer evokes North Africa without having ransacked it. In the first in a series, Dinah Hall captures the ambience

IT IS really only in the company of interior decorators that you recognise what a disadvantage a solid middle-class upbringing, with decent suburban values and wall-to-wall carpeting, can be in life. If you don't have a way with trimmings, blame it on your parents. It is those early formative tactile experiences, you see. The infantile roots of decorative taste were vividly described by the eccentric decorator/collector Charles Wade in 1945: 'This happy realm of under the table and round the skirtings, how intimate one was with the legs of furniture, textures and patterns of carpets, on friendly terms with grain, cracks and knots of the boards, the underneathness of things never seen by grown-ups.'

RADIO / Filling the unforgiving minute: Martin Kelner on the durable success of a radio programme that just goes on and on and on and on

'HELLO, as the Minute Waltz fades away once again, it's my pleasure to welcome you to Just A Minute, perhaps the most deceptively simple, enduring, popular, and much-copied comedy game on radio. And the subject is: why the longest-running game-show on radio, dismissed by some people 10 - even 20 - years ago as a clapped-out Victorian parlour game, should suddenly have become fashionable. Can you speak on that subject for just one minute without hesitation, repetition, or deviating from the subject on the card, Jonathan James-Moore, Head of BBC Radio Light Entertainment?'

Racing Commentary: Owners switch the onus to value: The people who pay the bills have started to demand more for their money from racecourses and trainers

RACEHORSE owners have at last revealed that they are not just cheque-writing machines, they have voice boxes too and this week they used them. Not that they were speaking in unison - the prime movers were as disparate as two Maktoum brothers and a quarter-shareholder in the Champion Hurdle hope Ruling - but the common cry was that they want more for their money.

RADIO / Only toffs or cockneys need apply

YOU DON'T have to know that Just a Minute (R4) was inspired by a public school punishment to see it as an upper-class parlour game. The hostile levity, the nonchalant way in which the precise score is never given ('Clement Freud is in the lead, just ahead of Derek Nimmo . . .'), the sports day whistle, the clubman's innuendo: all suggest a loosened black tie. The best contestants have been either toffs or cockneys.

Letter: Moving away from the classics

Sir: The National Curriculum Council's report (that the national curriculum is overloaded) will come as no surprise to classicists and other non-national curriculum specialists in state schools, who are being forcibly redeployed by the national curriculum away from their expertise to teach only official state-approved subjects (report, 19 January). If the Government's boasts of the diversity and choice available in our state schools, hollow enough as they are, are not to become a complete sham, it is urgent that the overloading of the Key Stage 3 syllabus (ages 11-14) be reduced, and quickly.
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General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

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Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence
Public relations as 'art'? Surely not

Confessions of a former PR man

The 'art' of public relations is being celebrated by the V&A museum, triggering some happy memories for DJ Taylor
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Bill Granger's luxurious sweet treats

Our chef loves to stop for 30 minutes to catch up on the day's gossip, while nibbling on something sweet
London Marathon 2015: Paula Radcliffe and the mother of all goodbyes

The mother of all goodbyes

Paula Radcliffe's farewell to the London Marathon will be a family affair
Everton vs Manchester United: Steven Naismith demands 'better' if Toffees are to upset the odds against United

Steven Naismith: 'We know we must do better'

The Everton forward explains the reasons behind club's decline this season
Arsenal vs Chelsea: Praise to Arsene Wenger for having the courage of his convictions

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Praise to Wenger for having the courage of his convictions