News The steller sea eagle can be 8ft in wing-span

Sea eagle, which has an 8ft wingspan, disappeared on Saturday

Wimbledon 'breaking law by killing pigeons'

There were ruffled feathers and no small amount of flapping at the world's most genteel tennis tournament yesterday after a threat of legal action from animal rights lobbyists over the culling of pigeons that had the temerity to bother some players.

Wimbledon Diary: McEnroe eager for spot of doubles with Henman

*Tim Henman yesterday gave a solid first-day performance in his transition from playing for a living to talking for his tea. If he'd mirrored his playing style, he would have started well, wobbled a bit and then pulled through, while assorted thousands sat on a hill pulling out their hair shouting "Not again." But, he was fine. And John McEnroe is certainly looking forward to working with Tim on commentary. "I think that could be a good combination," he told The Independent. Any advice for Tim? "Be yourself? I think I was a certain way on the court and people saw a different side of me. He's a certain way on the court, but I've seen a side of him that he should be showing on the commentary. I think that you'll see that: that wry sense of humour that he is capable of, that he wasn't able to share on the court the same way." So then, corsets at the ready. It should be side-splitting stuff from here on in. But will Mac the Mouth actually ever let Timbo near the mic? "Occasionally."

The Hacker: It's lambs to the slaughter as the shank contagion keeps spreading

Tales of shankers' woes have been pouring in since I dwelt last week on the dreaded act of hitting the ball sideways. It's bad luck even to mention the word and, sure enough, I did one myself last weekend – on Captain's Day of all days.

Louise Erdrich: Secrets in the Indian file

Her acclaimed fiction remembers the drama and tragedy of the Native American past. Louise Erdrich's latest novel, she tells John Freeman, is about memory itself

Legends in their own lunchtime: Skye Gyngell prepares a meal fit for the world's greatest chefs

It's the ultimate challenge: create a celebratory meal for the finest chefs on the planet. Luckily, says Skye Gyngell, Fergus Henderson, of London's St John, was more than up to the task – and with these recipes you could be too

Preview: Animal Magic, Eleven Fine Art, London

An exhibition that really gets under the skin

Stuffed quail in broth

Serves 4

The sound of silence: Britain's lost birds

The woodlands of Britain are becoming quieter every year, as native birds fail to reproduce and migrants don’t return. What exactly is going on? Michael McCarthy investigates

Sharp decline in sightings of garden birds

The number of birds seen in British gardens has fallen sharply during the past four years as a result of warmer winters and a long-term decline in their populations, according to a survey published today.

The Ballad of Dorothy Wordsworth, by Frances Wilson

The true story of the mouse and the turtle dove

Janet Street-Porter: Not every mother is from Middle England

A couple of days ago, a conference of headteachers expressed concern that schools were having to instill moral values in their pupils – particularly those from working-class families. A generation ago, parents were happy to set rules and discipline their children, but now increasing numbers of teachers are finding they have to assume this role, as school provides the only stable element in many children's lives.

Kempton: Brave Walsh delivers Post on Gungadu despite back injury

Nicholls' winner is not Cheltenham-bound but two hurdlers enhance their Festival hopes

Monarch of the kitchen: Meat doesn't come much more ethical than organically reared venison

Sophie Morris follows Britain's most pampered herd from pasture to plate

Watch the birdies: Which exotic visitors will you spot in your back garden?

As the RSPB gears up for its annual Big Birdwatch, Simon Usborne looks out for some of the more exotic visitors you may spot in your back garden
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone
Amazon is buying Twitch for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?

What is the appeal of Twitch?

Amazon is buying the video-game-themed online streaming site for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?
Tip-tapping typewriters, ripe pongs and slides in the office: Bosses are inventing surprising ways of making us work harder

How bosses are making us work harder

As it is revealed that one newspaper office pumps out the sound of typewriters to increase productivity, Gillian Orr explores the other devices designed to motivate staff
Manufacturers are struggling to keep up with the resurgence in vinyl records

Hard pressed: Resurgence in vinyl records

As the resurgence in vinyl records continues, manufacturers and their outdated machinery are struggling to keep up with the demand
Tony Jordan: 'I turned down the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series nine times ... then I found a kindred spirit'

A tale of two writers

Offered the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series, Tony Jordan turned it down. Nine times. The man behind EastEnders and Life on Mars didn’t feel right for the job. Finally, he gave in - and found an unexpected kindred spirit
Could a later start to the school day be the most useful educational reform of all?

Should pupils get a lie in?

Doctors want a later start to the school day so that pupils can sleep later. Not because teenagers are lazy, explains Simon Usborne - it's all down to their circadian rhythms
Prepare for Jewish jokes – as Jewish comedians get their own festival

Prepare for Jewish jokes...

... as Jewish comedians get their own festival
SJ Watson: 'I still can't quite believe that Before I Go to Sleep started in my head'

A dream come true for SJ Watson

Watson was working part time in the NHS when his debut novel, Before I Go to Sleep, became a bestseller. Now it's a Hollywood movie, too. Here he recalls the whirlwind journey from children’s ward to A-list film set
10 best cycling bags for commuters

10 best cycling bags for commuters

Gear up for next week’s National Cycle to Work day with one of these practical backpacks and messenger bags
Paul Scholes: Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United

Paul Scholes column

Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United
Kate Bush, Hammersmith Apollo music review: A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it

Kate Bush shows a voice untroubled by time

A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it
Robot sheepdog technology could be used to save people from burning buildings

The science of herding is cracked

Mathematical model would allow robots to be programmed to control crowds and save people from burning buildings
Tyrant: Is the world ready for a Middle Eastern 'Dallas'?

This tyrant doesn’t rule

It’s billed as a Middle Eastern ‘Dallas’, so why does Fox’s new drama have a white British star?