Arts and Entertainment

Wrote a Song for Everyone finds John Fogerty revisiting his Creedence songbook in the company of rock and country guests, with a final nod to his imagined bayou roots on a "Proud Mary" bristling with cajun raunch and second-line New Orleans funk, courtesy of Allen Toussaint and the Rebirth Brass Band.

Pop: They came, they saw, they missed the boat

NME PREMIER GIGS: SEBADOH, ELLIOTT SMITH, HEFNER, QUASI

Cheeky wine grower sold chateau DIY

A WINEMAKER struck by a failing crop turned to DIY wine kits to produce his special vintages, writes Andrew Buncombe.

Behind the song: Deeper and down

`You Oughta Know'

Pop: Playing fast and loud

Verbena's unorthodox brand of spiky, deep-south rock is backed up by their solid gigging reputation. Tim Perry talked to them as they prepared for a European tour with the Foo Fighters

live review; Travis Corn Exchange, Cambridge

Given the Travis "anytime, anyplace, anywhere" gigging ethic, it seems only fitting that they should be named after Harry Dean Stanton's wanderlust-filled character in Paris, Texas. The consensus among pop's illuminati is that, even in boys-with-guitars-jaded 1997, these Glaswegian troubadours have enough callow brilliance to succeed where other next- big-things have failed. Tonight, they're the zingy, lean cuisine before Cast's increasingly indigestible meat-and-potatoes Brit-beat. With the cock-sure front of waltzer fare-collectors, they proceed to trounce our senses with a bumper box of sonic fireworks which includes Radiohead-esque ballads and "new glam-aesthetic" stompalongs. From the bombastic thrum of "All I Want To Do Is Rock" to the Ramones-like simplicity of "Happy", Travis connect and enthrall.

Foo Fighters The Colour & The Shape Capitol

The Colour & The Shape may be an improvement on Foo Fighters' debut, but it has less impact. It is difficult to tell why; this is pleasant enough grunge-pop, energetic and melodic in roughly equal parts, but there is a touch of desperation about the album, as if Dave Grohl and his cronies realise that there's not that much mileage left in this kind of lumpen, overwrought American rock.

Black frost casts its shadow over Cotes du-Rhone

One week ago all seemed sleepily content in the prosperous hill villages west of Avignon where some of the cheaper brands of Cotes-du- Rhone are produced.

Bush The Forum, London

The sign behind the bar says: "Welcome to Bush - no crowd-surfing please, but enjoy the show." While it may seem unfair to damn a band with the health and safety policies of a venue they happen to be playing, the Forum's big-brotherly warning to their young clientele feels like an extension of the Bush experience.

The great pretender; Interview: Gavin Rossdale

The lead singer of Bush: too coiffed for a rock star, too popular for a rebel ... too old for his date of birth?

Pop Garbage The Forum, London

With minutes to go before Garbage took the stage for their first ever UK show, a flustered student was haggling with a ticket tout in the street outside. "Thirty quid?" the lad repeated, aghast. "I paid half that for David Bowie!" The barrel-necked tout leaned back on his heels, cold as a cadaver. "Yeh, but Bowie was crap," he said. "This is Garbage."

We're the Foo Fighters and this is not about Kurt

"HI, we're th' Foo Fighters," says the guy in the red T-shirt. He's not being entirely candid. He may be playing in a cramped student bar, but there are 14 photographers hoping that his hair will spill off his face so they can get a picture. There are more flapping notepads than there are publications that carry music reviews, so I can only assume that Farmer's Weekly has sent someone to elicit his views on crop density. He is Dave Grohl, formerly of Nirvana. Here we are, now entertain us.

Darling of the Slacker generation

SHOW PEOPLE JULIE DELPY

ARTS / An Odd One: Depravity, guilt, suffering, excess: there's a lot written in John Hurt's face. Now, after nine years in film and television, he is returning to the stage. Robert Butler meets an actor of substance

WHEN Mel Brooks needed to cast someone as Jesus in History of the World Part 1, he chose John Hurt. It's not a name that slips your mind when you're looking for someone to play one of the great sufferers. Hurt has taken on some of the most marginalised figures in screen history: Caligula, Raskolnikov, Timothy Evans, Quentin Crisp and John Merrick, the Elephant Man. 'I've played some odd ones, yeah,' says John Hurt, sitting on a sofa in Kensington. 'But then drama is about . . . odd ones, isn't it?'

Fashion Update: Back on the catwalk at fiftysomething

IN THE PAST they've trawled through the supermodels - Naomi Campbell to Cindy Crawford - but now it's the turn of the latest Hollywood brat pack to front the Hennes campaign. Although they may have saved on the six-figure modelling fees, no expense was spared on hiring the photographer Bruce Weber for the shoot.

Dissident voices, literary lives: Bush House, the home of the BBC World Service, is a nest of literary activity. Sabine Durrant meets the writers following in the footsteps of Orwell and Empson

The poisoned umbrella tip is still a talking point at Bush House. Wielded by person unknown, it injected a tiny lethal pellet into the leg of Georgi Markov, a Bulgarian dissident working at the BBC World Service, shortly after he left the building on 11 September 1978. He died four days later. One theory, among many, is that his murder may have had something to do with the fact that he was a novelist - an anti-Communist one - and that he insisted on broadcasting extracts from his novels over the air. Creative activity, rather than political, may have brought about his death.
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