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Thousands of people joined druids and pagans who gathered together to celebrate the Winter Solstice at Stonehenge, the shortest day and longest night of the year.

Letter: Stonehenge prevails

Sir: In calling Stonehenge Europe's largest megalithic monument in my letter (5 January), I made the assumption that The Cursus and The Avenue are part of the Stonehenge complex. Brendan Glynane (letter, 10 January) may therefore wish to enjoin the West Kennet Avenue to the outer bank at Avebury - but Stonehenge still remains the larger of the two Neolithic complexes.

Letter: Avebury is larger

Sir: Michael Balfour (Letters, 5 January) asserts that Stonehenge is the largest megalithic monument in Europe; not so. The henge monument at Avebury is older and covers an area 13 times the size of Stonehenge.

Letter: Stones stand alone

Sir: In his letter of 29 December, Adrian G. Gilbert refers to the Great Pyramid as 'the most important ancient monument in the world'. It is not. That title is held by Stonehenge, the largest megalithic monument in Europe, which, despite its outward appearance, is a very well preserved and astonishingly complicated instrument of prediction.

Obituary: Alan Hill

IN HIS obituary of Alan Hill (22 December), Tony Beale properly stressed Alan's immense contribution to educational publishing, writes Professor David Harris.

Stonehenge survey

Archaeologists are to conduct a geophysical survey of Stonehenge, in Wiltshire, in an attempt to discover unearthed remains, which may shed light on the origin of the stone rings.

Iron Age settlement found on mud flats

(First Edition)

ARCHAEOLOGY / Caveman comes into the open: A Stone Age site of international importance could be under threat, writes David Keys

A UNIQUE Stone Age settlement - discovered earlier this year near Newark, Nottinghamshire - will be under threat of destruction, unless county and national heritage organisations succeed in persuading farmers not to deep-plough the remains.

Mine flood reveals prehistoric workings: Bronze Age excavation changes perception of early British civilisations. Oliver Gillie reports

AN ENTRANCE to prehistoric copper mines has been found at Great Ormes Head, a rocky headland near Llandudno, North Wales. The mines were first discovered 20 years ago, but their extent and their importance for the history of the British Isles is only beginning to be understood.

BOOK REVIEW / Beyond fringe benefits: 'After Colette' - Joan Lingard: Sinclair-Stevenson, 14.99 pounds

APPARENTLY Joan Lingard was a friend of the performance artist Nancy Cole, who once adorned the Edinburgh Fringe with her one-woman show about Gertrude Stein. Cole mysteriously vanished in 1987 and the niggling void led Lingard to write this novel about a similarly single-minded and vanished artiste whose own obsession was Colette.

Obituary: Vincent T. Hamlin

Vincent Trout Hamlin, cartoonist: born Perry, Iowa 10 May 1900; married Dorothy Stapleton (died 1984; one son, one daughter); died Spring Hill, Florida 14 June 1993.

Riches of prehistoric Ulster put on display: A pounds 4m archaeological park has opened on the site of an ancient tribal centre near Armagh

ULSTER'S first capital - a prehistoric royal centre near modern-day Armagh - is to become one of the first archaeological parks in Europe, in a project backed by academics and businessmen from both sides of the Irish border.

Letter: Stonehenge past and present: Correction

The letter from Michael Pitts of 22 May incorrectly described him as the present curator of the Alexander Keiller Museum in Avebury. In fact he was the curator from 1974 to 1984.

Stonehenge ban

Police have implemented a four- mile-radius 'exclusion zone' at Stonehenge, in Wiltshire, to stop hippies holding an illegal summer solstice celebration at the monument this weekend.

BOOK REVIEW / Looking for the wild man in all of us: 'In Search of the Neanderthals' - Christopher Stringer and Clive Gamble: Thames & Hudson, 18.95 pounds

DID YOU see a Neanderthal when you looked in the mirror this morning? According to one school of thought, you probably did - if you are of European stock, at any rate. According to another, the only people who have seen Neanderthals are those who live in far-flung quarters of central Asia where 'wild men' are occasionally spotted. The idea that Neanderthals survive as cousins of the abominable snowman belongs to the fringe; the argument that Neanderthal genes live on in modern humans is made by an influential group of scientists.

Letter: Stonehenge past and present

Sir: I am so very lucky to have visited Stonehenge many years ago ('Stonehenge to remain a 'national disgrace' ', 18 May). No visitor centre, no toilet blocks, no goods shop - we simply parked the car on the road, and walked up to it. No ropes, no notices, just a couple of guides to make sure we respected the site and to answer our questions.
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