Sport David Coleman has died aged 87

Coleman covered the Olympics among others for the BBC for nearly 50 years with his final swansong coming at the 2000 Sydney Games

We can't bank on trust alone

Every fallen hero, every instant villain should cause us to re- evaluate our failings as a society For trust to work, it must be pledged in the full knowledge of what vulnerabili ty it brings

Cinema : Redford 1, Stone 0 (a.e.t.)

THE AGE of innocence ended with the box, according to Robert Redford's Quiz Show (15). Not Pandora's Box, but television. The movie dusts off a scandal of the late 1950s, when contestants on the show Twenty-One, including the reigning champion Charles Van Doren (Ralph Fiennes), were found to have been fed the answers. But its broader purpose is a dressing- down of America.

A QUESTION OF THOUGHT

Television quiz shows, once the guilty preserve of idlers and lowbrows, are suddenly fashionable, ubiquitous and admired by media studies gurus. Is there more to the format than meets the eye - or less to our culture?

Win a vintage TV - or a private movie

COMPETITION (BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE MAKERS OF `QUIZ SHOW')

AND THE nominations ARE...

Woody Allen rehabilitated; British thespians applauded. Phil Reeves on how the Oscars are going down in LA

And your specialist subject: deception

Perjury, rigged results, a Presidential condemnation - Robert Redford's Quiz Show uncovers a scandal that rocked Fifties America. By Sheila Johnston

An enema of the people

The US found Alan Parker's Road to Wellville unpalatable. It may be mo re to British tastes says Sheila Johnston Satire is not a mode with which US audiences are very comfortable

Dale Winton, the king of the aisles TV's tackiest game-show host is a fast-growing cult. Justine Picardie met him

IF YOU ever need living proof that kitsch is hip, then simply look at Dale Winton. He is the presenter of Supermarket Sweep, a daytime game show so tacky that it makes Celebrity Squares look like Panorama. Yet 3 million viewers love him; and they'

Out of America: Questioning an age of innocence lost

WASHINGTON - I have a confession - I am addicted to quiz shows. The first volley of questions, and I am glued to the television or the radio.

FILM / A truth too naked for us to bear: Two new movies put television in the dock. They may be upstaged by it when the O J Simpson trial opens. Quentin Curtis explains

THE GREATEST auteurs of the future may be ourselves. After the slog and before the mystique, film directing is largely a matter of selecting images. To Hitchcock the business of directing was a bore because he'd done it all before on storyboards. For others the act of creation comes in the inspired Pelmanism of editing. Sitting in our living rooms, the television overflowing with images, we increasingly resemble such directors, shaping our entertainment with the remote-control buttons. When O J Simpson made his Ford Bronco trip to Rockingham (via Sunset Boulevard), I was watching in London, flipping between two channels carrying shots from different helicopters, between images that were grimy but close-up, and ones that were clearer but further away. Sitting in my armchair, editing the century's most wrenching chase sequence, I began to feel I was watching the future of film - or, perhaps, its death.

Seat of learning: A wine bar in London's theatreland plays host to monthly meetings of a very exclusive club. Emma Cook pitted her wits against them

It's got to be one of the most harrowing ways of earning 15 minutes of fame - sitting in Mastermind's black chair and baring your intellect to the scrutiny of the BBC's coolest question-master, Magnus Magnusson.

RADIO / A question of settling old scores: Listeners are being enticed to Radio 3 with quiz shows. Dermot Clinch listens in

Every summer there comes a period when Radio 3 finds itself with an average of half a million more listeners than it's used to. They come to hear the Proms; and when the Proms are over, they disappear back to where they came from. At least that's how it used to be. This year the BBC has decided the half million should be enticed to stay: 'Radio 3,' the Corporation admitted not long ago, 'should be more accessible and appealing to classical music listeners.' Which explains why, last weekend, Radio 3 was invaded by two programmes of a kind rarely associated with that institution. One was a panel show. The other was a quiz game.

Rushdie on TV quiz

The author,Salman Rushdie, 46, still in hiding over a fatwa issued by the Ayatollah Khomeini in 1989 over 'The Satanic Verses', is a surprise guest on tonight's edition of the BBC 2 comedy quiz, Have I Got News For You. The show was recorded in London last night.

Captain Moonlight: Always good for a laugh

NICHOLAS PARSONS had been in Croydon. Now he was in a hotel at the foothills of Hampstead, near his London flat. He has memoirs to sell. Read all about it here today; later in the week, the Sun, big spread, at home with partner, in the Cotswolds. That's show business. Another sip from the pint of lager, another carefully modulated offering about the difficulty of writing and the importance of laughter. This is a man who once held the world record for the longest after-dinner speech: 11 hours. Jointly, with Gyles Brandreth.

A CRITICAL GUIDE: STAYING IN / Long Runners: No 28: Blockbusters

Age: 12. It was piloted by ATV in December 1981 and the first series was transmitted by Central in August 1983.
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence