Sport David Coleman has died aged 87

Coleman covered the Olympics among others for the BBC for nearly 50 years with his final swansong coming at the 2000 Sydney Games

We can't bank on trust alone

Every fallen hero, every instant villain should cause us to re- evaluate our failings as a society For trust to work, it must be pledged in the full knowledge of what vulnerabili ty it brings

Cinema : Redford 1, Stone 0 (a.e.t.)

THE AGE of innocence ended with the box, according to Robert Redford's Quiz Show (15). Not Pandora's Box, but television. The movie dusts off a scandal of the late 1950s, when contestants on the show Twenty-One, including the reigning champion Charles Van Doren (Ralph Fiennes), were found to have been fed the answers. But its broader purpose is a dressing- down of America.

A QUESTION OF THOUGHT

Television quiz shows, once the guilty preserve of idlers and lowbrows, are suddenly fashionable, ubiquitous and admired by media studies gurus. Is there more to the format than meets the eye - or less to our culture?

Win a vintage TV - or a private movie

COMPETITION (BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE MAKERS OF `QUIZ SHOW')

AND THE nominations ARE...

Woody Allen rehabilitated; British thespians applauded. Phil Reeves on how the Oscars are going down in LA

And your specialist subject: deception

Perjury, rigged results, a Presidential condemnation - Robert Redford's Quiz Show uncovers a scandal that rocked Fifties America. By Sheila Johnston

An enema of the people

The US found Alan Parker's Road to Wellville unpalatable. It may be mo re to British tastes says Sheila Johnston Satire is not a mode with which US audiences are very comfortable

Dale Winton, the king of the aisles TV's tackiest game-show host is a fast-growing cult. Justine Picardie met him

IF YOU ever need living proof that kitsch is hip, then simply look at Dale Winton. He is the presenter of Supermarket Sweep, a daytime game show so tacky that it makes Celebrity Squares look like Panorama. Yet 3 million viewers love him; and they'

Out of America: Questioning an age of innocence lost

WASHINGTON - I have a confession - I am addicted to quiz shows. The first volley of questions, and I am glued to the television or the radio.

FILM / A truth too naked for us to bear: Two new movies put television in the dock. They may be upstaged by it when the O J Simpson trial opens. Quentin Curtis explains

THE GREATEST auteurs of the future may be ourselves. After the slog and before the mystique, film directing is largely a matter of selecting images. To Hitchcock the business of directing was a bore because he'd done it all before on storyboards. For others the act of creation comes in the inspired Pelmanism of editing. Sitting in our living rooms, the television overflowing with images, we increasingly resemble such directors, shaping our entertainment with the remote-control buttons. When O J Simpson made his Ford Bronco trip to Rockingham (via Sunset Boulevard), I was watching in London, flipping between two channels carrying shots from different helicopters, between images that were grimy but close-up, and ones that were clearer but further away. Sitting in my armchair, editing the century's most wrenching chase sequence, I began to feel I was watching the future of film - or, perhaps, its death.

Seat of learning: A wine bar in London's theatreland plays host to monthly meetings of a very exclusive club. Emma Cook pitted her wits against them

It's got to be one of the most harrowing ways of earning 15 minutes of fame - sitting in Mastermind's black chair and baring your intellect to the scrutiny of the BBC's coolest question-master, Magnus Magnusson.

RADIO / A question of settling old scores: Listeners are being enticed to Radio 3 with quiz shows. Dermot Clinch listens in

Every summer there comes a period when Radio 3 finds itself with an average of half a million more listeners than it's used to. They come to hear the Proms; and when the Proms are over, they disappear back to where they came from. At least that's how it used to be. This year the BBC has decided the half million should be enticed to stay: 'Radio 3,' the Corporation admitted not long ago, 'should be more accessible and appealing to classical music listeners.' Which explains why, last weekend, Radio 3 was invaded by two programmes of a kind rarely associated with that institution. One was a panel show. The other was a quiz game.

Rushdie on TV quiz

The author,Salman Rushdie, 46, still in hiding over a fatwa issued by the Ayatollah Khomeini in 1989 over 'The Satanic Verses', is a surprise guest on tonight's edition of the BBC 2 comedy quiz, Have I Got News For You. The show was recorded in London last night.

Captain Moonlight: Always good for a laugh

NICHOLAS PARSONS had been in Croydon. Now he was in a hotel at the foothills of Hampstead, near his London flat. He has memoirs to sell. Read all about it here today; later in the week, the Sun, big spread, at home with partner, in the Cotswolds. That's show business. Another sip from the pint of lager, another carefully modulated offering about the difficulty of writing and the importance of laughter. This is a man who once held the world record for the longest after-dinner speech: 11 hours. Jointly, with Gyles Brandreth.

A CRITICAL GUIDE: STAYING IN / Long Runners: No 28: Blockbusters

Age: 12. It was piloted by ATV in December 1981 and the first series was transmitted by Central in August 1983.
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona from £629pp
Dubrovnik
Vietnam
Bruges
South Africa
Spain
Prices correct as of 12 December 2014
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'You look for someone who's an inspiration and try to be like them'

Homeless Veterans appeal

In 2010, Sgt Gary Jamieson stepped on an IED in Afghanistan and lost his legs and an arm. He reveals what, and who, helped him to make a remarkable recovery
Could cannabis oil reverse the effects of cancer?

Could cannabis oil reverse effects of cancer?

As a film following six patients receiving the controversial treatment is released, Kate Hilpern uncovers a very slippery issue
The Interview movie review: You can't see Seth Rogen and James Franco's Kim Jong Un assassination film, but you can read about it here

The Interview movie review

You can't see Seth Rogen and James Franco's Kim Jong Un assassination film, but you can read about it here
Serial mania has propelled podcasts into the cultural mainstream

How podcasts became mainstream

People have consumed gripping armchair investigation Serial with a relish typically reserved for box-set binges
Jesus Christ has become an unlikely pin-up for hipster marketing companies

Jesus Christ has become an unlikely pin-up

Kevin Lee Light, aka "Jesus", is the newest client of creative agency Mother while rival agency Anomaly has launched Sexy Jesus, depicting the Messiah in a series of Athena-style poses
Rosetta space mission voted most important scientific breakthrough of 2014

A memorable year for science – if not for mice

The most important scientific breakthroughs of 2014
Christmas cocktails to make you merry: From eggnog to Brown Betty and Rum Bumpo

Christmas cocktails to make you merry

Mulled wine is an essential seasonal treat. But now drinkers are rediscovering other traditional festive tipples. Angela Clutton raises a glass to Christmas cocktails
5 best activity trackers

Fitness technology: 5 best activity trackers

Up the ante in your regimen and change the habits of a lifetime with this wearable tech
Paul Scholes column: It's a little-known fact, but I have played one of the seven dwarves

Paul Scholes column

It's a little-known fact, but I have played one of the seven dwarves
Fifa's travelling circus once again steals limelight from real stars

Fifa's travelling circus once again steals limelight from real stars

Club World Cup kicked into the long grass by the continued farce surrounding Blatter, Garcia, Russia and Qatar
Frank Warren column: 2014 – boxing is back and winning new fans

Frank Warren: Boxing is back and winning new fans

2014 proves it's now one of sport's biggest hitters again
Jeb Bush vs Hillary Clinton: The power dynamics of the two first families

Jeb Bush vs Hillary Clinton

Karen Tumulty explores the power dynamics of the two first families
Stockholm is rivalling Silicon Valley with a hotbed of technology start-ups

Stockholm is rivalling Silicon Valley

The Swedish capital is home to two of the most popular video games in the world, as well as thousands of technology start-ups worth hundreds of millions of pounds – and it's all happened since 2009
Did Japanese workers really get their symbols mixed up and display Santa on a crucifix?

Crucified Santa: Urban myth refuses to die

The story goes that Japanese store workers created a life-size effigy of a smiling "Father Kurisumasu" attached to a facsimile of Our Lord's final instrument of torture
Jennifer Saunders and Kate Moss join David Walliams on set for TV adaptation of The Boy in the Dress

The Boy in the Dress: On set with the stars

Walliams' story about a boy who goes to school in a dress will be shown this Christmas