Arts and Entertainment

Bentley's Oyster Bar & Grill, London

Leading article: A sting in the tail

You might be hard put to explain why it is, but Britons seem to have a fervent sympathy for bumblebees. Here are a few suggestions. They're furry and appear cuddly. (They remind us of mammals.) They're obviously hard working (no scroungers they). They're as much a part of our gardens as lawns. (Or they were.) Their first appearance is an unmistakable sign of the spring. (Or it was.) Their drowsy buzzing is one of the sounds of summer. (Or it should be.) They might only be the size of your thumbnail but they are among Britain's most popular creatures.

Thom Yorke: Protest singer

Thom Yorke is able to do whatever he wants: not content with being the creative genius of Radiohead, the 37-year-old is about to release a solo album and can breezily turn down invites to Downing Street. So why, wonders Nick Duerden, has the king of guitar rock become such a grump?

Ron Simmonds

Jazz all-rounder and web archivist

Radio 3 Awards, Ronnie Scott's, London

Cinematic Orchestra, Ronnie Scott's, London

Can't stand all that jazz? Try some hip-hop, chill-out, funk

The first law of jazz

'You can generally tell the character of saxophonists from their tone. The rougher they sound, the sweeter they are in real life'

Celebrating The Jazz Couriers

Pizza Express Jazz Club, London

Critics' Awards 1999 - Jazz: That's quite enough of looking to the past

In 1999 what had been threatening for years actually happened: the ghost of jazz past all but obliterated the present. This wasn't surprising - the cumulative weight of a music which began at the same time as the century itself had been pressing down ever since the CD reissue boom of the late 1980s - but it was the centenary of Duke Ellington that finally tipped the scales. Tribute concerts by Wynton Marsalis at the Barbican, a special weekend at the South Bank and other festschrifts too numerous to mention all honoured the Duke, but left little room for anything else.

Obituary: Philip Sansom

BY THE time of his death, Philip Sansom had been almost forgotten in an intellectual and political world that had honoured, if not enriched, his friend, colleague, and fellow anarchist Colin Ward.

Music: Seventy, and still blowing strong

Phil Johnson talks to Sonny Rollins on the eve of a rare visit to London

Villagers unite to repel invaders and keep idyll pure

VISITORS WHO flocked to the Gloucestershire village of Lower Slaughter yesterday tucked into their bank holiday picnics, watched the locals trimming their wisteria, and uncorked their champagne by the river Eye.

Going Out: Jazz & Blues

The acid-jazz sound that has taken the London club scene by storm in recent years owes no small debt to vibraphonist Roy Ayers (above). With a career stretching back to the early Sixties, Ayers, who appears at Ronnie Scott's, Frith Street from Monday, has been a prime mover in the development of the soul/ jazz and R&B/funk styles that are proving so popular.

Jazz: Live - Imitate to innovate

MARK ISHAM RONNIE SCOTT'S LONDON
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