Arts and Entertainment

Bentley's Oyster Bar & Grill, London

Jazz: Now that's what I call culture shock

Moire Music African Drum Orchestra Salisbury Festival Colin Towns' Mask Orchestra Bath Festival

Jazz: Pure, gigantic air

Jazz Round-up

Pop/Jazz: Jazz & Blues

Over the past decade or so, tenor saxophonist Joe Lovano has emerged as one of the most interesting stylists of the era. An impressive series of albums on Blue Note have seen him working in a variety of settings, but he seems most comfortable in the trio setting seen on last year's highly-rated album Trio Fascination Edition One. His accompanists for the week at Ronnie Scott's, Frith Street that starts on Monday - Cameron Brown and Idris Muhamed - are not as well known as Dave Holland and Elvin Jones, the rhythm section for that record, but the shows should be fascinating.

Who needs Waitco's - or Ronnie Scott's for that matter?

As for nothing happening outside London, and supermarkets being cheap - I doubt both

JAZZ: The bossest nova

Vinicius Canturia, Bugge Wesseltoft

Music: Fanfare to free form

The late Sixties proved to be a zenith of British jazz. Richard Williams celebrates its dynamic scene

Dealing with the cowboys who run the Rodeo Times

THERE'S A very odd thing in my current West/Wales edition of the Radio Times. They've printed the same page twice. It appears first on page 62 as Today's Choices for Saturday's TV - a list of five programmes which some unnamed person at the Radio Times thinks are better than all the rest. But if you turn to page 96 and look at Today's Choices for Tuesday 26 January, you will find the same five programmes recommended even though they have all gone out three days previously.

The 50 best: Book your seat for the best of 1999

The arts world is waking up after the long Christmas lay-off - so it's a good time to round up the pick of what the new season has to offer, from Robbie Williams to Terrence Malick, and Cate Blanchett to Claude Monet. And if it turns out to be half as exciting as it sounds, 1999 may be a vintage year ...

Drink: Mourning after

Japanese worms, head-cheese, and other hangover cures

Words: fuddy duddy, n.

THERE IS a distressing tendency among English writers of a certain age - Alan Hollinghurst, Joan Smith, Geoff Dyer - to frequent raves.

Music: Too good to be forgotten

Joe Harriott was one of the great jazz innovators of the Sixties, fit to rank with the heavyweights. So why isn't he as famous as John Coltrane? Because he was invisible.

Jazz: That's magic

PAOLO CONTE

Interview: Vivienne Westwood: Fashion's pearly queen

Vivienne Westwood is still at it: winning awards for her clothes, living with a man half her age, and as batty and opinionated as ever. By Dominic Lutyens

Jazz Festival preview: Meanwhile, in Tin Pan Alley ...

Call it retro, call it postmodern - call it anything you like in fact - but contemporary jazz isn't really contemporary any more. Instead, it's mostly hurtling ever backwards in a kind of fast-rewind through the styles of the last five decades. For a new artist who wants to be successful, a refuge offered by the past - in, say ,the musically dexterous world of post-war small-group swing a la Nat "King" Cole - may therefore seem as good a place as any to pitch up. This process partly explains the incredible success of the Canadian pianist and singer Diana Krall - the biggest new name in jazz - who headlines an Oris London Jazz Festival concert at the Barbican on Thursday. But Krall isn't just a symptom of some cultural malaise: she's really, really, good. Her voice is a dream of close-miked, breathy expressiveness, her piano playing swings like the clappers, and she has impeccable jazz credentials. But why does she have to sound like 1952?
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