Arts and Entertainment

Bentley's Oyster Bar & Grill, London

Jazz: The Vinnie Jones school of jazz

JOE ZAWINUL SYNDICATE

Interview: Dave Brubeck - Dave, the jazzmen's fave

He's 78 and about to start a 13-date UK tour. But Dave Brubeck, the man who brought jazz to the attention of middle-class America, has no intention of taking five. By Phil Johnson

Edinburgh Festival: Jazz: A maestro in full bloom

HERBIE FLOWERS GRAFFITI

Jazz: Like the man never left us

THE MINGUS BIG BAND RONNIE SCOTT'S LONDON

Obituary: Benny Green

BENNY GREEN did much to unlock the mystery of musical creation for the layman. An enthusiastic jazz saxophonist as well as a witty and versatile writer and broadcaster, he was able to write lucidly about the problems facing composers and performers. He knew that the musician "is a hired hand pledged to making the fortune of the bandleader with whom he is expected to reach a relationship of grovelling servitude".

Jazz: Come on Jose, light our fires

THOUGH EVERYONE knows Jose Feliciano's wonderfully slack, slowed- down and jazz-inflected version of the Doors' "Light My Fire" - his big breakthrough hit 30 years ago - but most of us know little else. There is a vague memory of the "genius" tag with which he was once promoted, a heavy rep that sightless singers in the 1960s almost seemed to be burdened with as a matter of course. If Ray Charles was the genius of soul, and Stevie Wonder was, well, another one, Jose Feliciano was their Latin cousin, the blind Puerto Rican boy brought up in a family of 12 in Spanish Harlem who overcame adversity by singing and playing the guitar. The part of the story that we maybe didn't get, although if you were listening it must have been evident all along, is that Feliciano doesn't just play his guitar: he pretty much re-invents it.

Jazz: Sweet essence of Cologne

Phil Johnson listens to old and new from Keith Jarrett and material from Tubby Hayes' vintage Ronnie Scotts recordings

Going the extra mile

Birmingham's football clubs may not be as successful as sides from neighbouring Manchester and Liverpool, but England's second city still leads the clubbing league table. Revellers who are willing to travel the extra mile for new excitement will invariably find themselves in the Midlands at weekends.

Review: And all that jazz

Dave Holland Ronnie Scott's

Jazz: This isn't jazz. This is just terrible telly

"WELCOME to Jazz Club. Nice!" In the wake of The Fast Show's wickedly funny skit in which a bouffant-haired, Seventies-suited compere introduces incomprehensible acts with self-regarding, in-for-a-dig asides to-camera ("Amazing!"), Jazz 606 (BBC 2, Wed) was always going to have a hard time taking itself seriously. If only they'd been bold enough to get Jazz Club's fictitious frontman to present their own programme, the format could maybe have worked. As it is, the series (two down, four to go) is unlikely to please either committed fans or the promiscuous channel- surfers it's probably aimed at. And let's face it, even an actor in a bad wig would be preferable to the presenter they have chosen to go with, the Mancunian poet Lemn Sissay.

The end of the American dream

OPENING THIS WEEK

JAZZ: So much sax, his knees were shaking

Not many musicians have the temerity to go for sheer, swooning ecstasy from the off, but the American saxophonist Charles Lloyd began his set at the Royal Festival Hall last Monday with a solo that immediately plunged us into the farthest reaches of a music not so much recollected in tranquillity as wrenched from some deep, sensual core. Against a hypnotic pulse from piano, bass and drums, Lloyd produced one long breath of transfiguring emotion, his body swaying and knees trembling from the intensity of it all.

People: Clarke faces the music over new tobacco job

It looked as though Kenneth Clarke had never had it so good. Having shrugged off his defeat by William Hague for the leadership of the Conservative Party, the cigar-loving former Chancellor yesterday picked up a lucrative directorship with a tobacco conglomerate, made his debut as a disc jockey and starred in an Oxford Union debate.
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