Arts and Entertainment

Bentley's Oyster Bar & Grill, London

Jazz: The Vinnie Jones school of jazz

JOE ZAWINUL SYNDICATE

Interview: Dave Brubeck - Dave, the jazzmen's fave

He's 78 and about to start a 13-date UK tour. But Dave Brubeck, the man who brought jazz to the attention of middle-class America, has no intention of taking five. By Phil Johnson

Edinburgh Festival: Jazz: A maestro in full bloom

HERBIE FLOWERS GRAFFITI

Jazz: Like the man never left us

THE MINGUS BIG BAND RONNIE SCOTT'S LONDON

Obituary: Benny Green

BENNY GREEN did much to unlock the mystery of musical creation for the layman. An enthusiastic jazz saxophonist as well as a witty and versatile writer and broadcaster, he was able to write lucidly about the problems facing composers and performers. He knew that the musician "is a hired hand pledged to making the fortune of the bandleader with whom he is expected to reach a relationship of grovelling servitude".

Jazz: Come on Jose, light our fires

THOUGH EVERYONE knows Jose Feliciano's wonderfully slack, slowed- down and jazz-inflected version of the Doors' "Light My Fire" - his big breakthrough hit 30 years ago - but most of us know little else. There is a vague memory of the "genius" tag with which he was once promoted, a heavy rep that sightless singers in the 1960s almost seemed to be burdened with as a matter of course. If Ray Charles was the genius of soul, and Stevie Wonder was, well, another one, Jose Feliciano was their Latin cousin, the blind Puerto Rican boy brought up in a family of 12 in Spanish Harlem who overcame adversity by singing and playing the guitar. The part of the story that we maybe didn't get, although if you were listening it must have been evident all along, is that Feliciano doesn't just play his guitar: he pretty much re-invents it.

Jazz: Sweet essence of Cologne

Phil Johnson listens to old and new from Keith Jarrett and material from Tubby Hayes' vintage Ronnie Scotts recordings

Going the extra mile

Birmingham's football clubs may not be as successful as sides from neighbouring Manchester and Liverpool, but England's second city still leads the clubbing league table. Revellers who are willing to travel the extra mile for new excitement will invariably find themselves in the Midlands at weekends.

Review: And all that jazz

Dave Holland Ronnie Scott's

Jazz: This isn't jazz. This is just terrible telly

"WELCOME to Jazz Club. Nice!" In the wake of The Fast Show's wickedly funny skit in which a bouffant-haired, Seventies-suited compere introduces incomprehensible acts with self-regarding, in-for-a-dig asides to-camera ("Amazing!"), Jazz 606 (BBC 2, Wed) was always going to have a hard time taking itself seriously. If only they'd been bold enough to get Jazz Club's fictitious frontman to present their own programme, the format could maybe have worked. As it is, the series (two down, four to go) is unlikely to please either committed fans or the promiscuous channel- surfers it's probably aimed at. And let's face it, even an actor in a bad wig would be preferable to the presenter they have chosen to go with, the Mancunian poet Lemn Sissay.

The end of the American dream

OPENING THIS WEEK

JAZZ: So much sax, his knees were shaking

Not many musicians have the temerity to go for sheer, swooning ecstasy from the off, but the American saxophonist Charles Lloyd began his set at the Royal Festival Hall last Monday with a solo that immediately plunged us into the farthest reaches of a music not so much recollected in tranquillity as wrenched from some deep, sensual core. Against a hypnotic pulse from piano, bass and drums, Lloyd produced one long breath of transfiguring emotion, his body swaying and knees trembling from the intensity of it all.

People: Clarke faces the music over new tobacco job

It looked as though Kenneth Clarke had never had it so good. Having shrugged off his defeat by William Hague for the leadership of the Conservative Party, the cigar-loving former Chancellor yesterday picked up a lucrative directorship with a tobacco conglomerate, made his debut as a disc jockey and starred in an Oxford Union debate.
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Homeless Veterans Christmas Appeal: ‘We give them hope. They come to us when no one else can help’

Christmas Appeal

Meet the charity giving homeless veterans hope – and who they turn to when no one else can help
Should doctors and patients learn to plan humane, happier endings rather than trying to prolong life?

Is it always right to try to prolong life?

Most of us would prefer to die in our own beds, with our families beside us. But, as a GP, Margaret McCartney sees too many end their days in a medicalised battle
Thomas Cook's outgoing boss Harriet Green got by on four hours sleep a night - is that what it takes for women to get to the top?

What does it take for women to get to the top?

Thomas Cook's outgoing boss Harriet Green got by on four hours sleep a night and told women they had to do more if they wanted to get on
Christmas jumper craze: Inside the UK factory behind this year's multicultural must-have

Knitting pretty: British Christmas Jumpers

Simmy Richman visits Jack Masters, the company behind this year's multicultural must-have
French chefs have launched a campaign to end violence in kitchens - should British restaurants follow suit?

French chefs campaign against bullying

A group of top chefs signed a manifesto against violence in kitchens following the sacking of a chef at a Paris restaurant for scalding his kitchen assistant with a white-hot spoon
Radio 4 to broadcast 10-hour War and Peace on New Year's Day as Controller warns of cuts

Just what you need on a New Year hangover...

Radio 4 to broadcast 10-hour adaptation of War and Peace on first day of 2015
Cuba set to stage its first US musical in 50 years

Cuba to stage first US musical in 50 years

Claire Allfree finds out if the new production of Rent will hit the right note in Havana
Christmas 2014: 10 best educational toys

Learn and play: 10 best educational toys

Of course you want them to have fun, but even better if they can learn at the same time
Paul Scholes column: I like Brendan Rodgers as a manager but Liverpool seem to be going backwards not forwards this season

Paul Scholes column

I like Brendan Rodgers as a manager but Liverpool seem to be going backwards not forwards this season
Lewis Moody column: Stuart Lancaster has made all the right calls – now England must deliver

Lewis Moody: Lancaster has made all the right calls – now England must deliver

So what must the red-rose do differently? They have to take the points on offer 
Cameron, Miliband and Clegg join forces for Homeless Veterans campaign

Cameron, Miliband and Clegg join forces for Homeless Veterans campaign

It's in all our interests to look after servicemen and women who fall on hard times, say party leaders
Millionaire Sol Campbell wades into wealthy backlash against Labour's mansion tax

Sol Campbell cries foul at Labour's mansion tax

The former England defender joins Myleene Klass, Griff Rhys Jones and Melvyn Bragg in criticising proposals
Nicolas Sarkozy returns: The ex-President is preparing to fight for the leadership of France's main opposition party – but will he win big enough?

Sarkozy returns

The ex-President is preparing to fight for the leadership of France's main opposition party – but will he win big enough?
Is the criticism of Ed Miliband a coded form of anti-Semitism?

Is the criticism of Miliband anti-Semitic?

Attacks on the Labour leader have coalesced around a sense that he is different, weird, a man apart. But is the criticism more sinister?
Ouija boards are the must-have gift this Christmas, fuelled by a schlock horror film

Ouija boards are the must-have festive gift

Simon Usborne explores the appeal - and mysteries - of a century-old parlour game