Sport Katherine Grainger and Anna Watkins win gold for the women's double sculls rowing event on day seven of the Olympics

Olympic gold medallist Anna Watkins has announced that she will not defend her double sculls title with Katherine Grainger in Rio  in 2016 after the birth of her son, although she has not ruled out making a comeback at Tokyo 2020.

Rowing: Natalie follows in the wake of famous father

Natalie Redgrave, Sir Steve Redgrave's 19-year-old daughter, won the biggest race of her rowing career when she was part of the Oxford crew that beat Cambridge in the Women's Boat Race at Henley yesterday, writes Paul Newman.

Duffy's 48-hour drinking binge

Duffy once went on a 48-hour drinking binge.

End of the Rainbow, Trafalgar Studios, London

Watching End of the Rainbow, it's hard to believe that Judy Garland is dead, so closely does Tracie Bennett resemble her, bodily and in spirit. In Peter Quilter's play – a depiction of the one-time Dorothy's final fight for the limelight in the months before her death from an accidental drug overdose – Bennett nimbly rasps and cackles, seeming to speak and sing with the late actress's voice. Her triumphant performance shows Garland wrestling with a medley of addictions – to barbiturates, Benzedrine, Ritalin and other "adult candy" as well as to alcohol, men and applause. Her characterisation is at once alluring, in its dizzy abandon, and terrifying, as you watch a fragile person heading for the brink.

Rowing: Golden Grainger puts Britain first

Great Britain finished the World Championships on top of the medal table after Katherine Grainger and Anna Watkins secured a fifth gold in the women's double sculls on New Zealand's Lake Karapiro yesterday.

Rowing: GB's lightweight four strike gold

Britain won their third gold of the world championships – in the men's lightweight four – on a day of thrilling finals in Karapiro, New Zealand.

Olympic sculls duo complete the set

Great Britain clinched two more gold medals at the World Rowing Championships in New Zealand yesterday in extremely tough conditions that were criticised as "unfair" by a number of the team.

Chalk Talk: How I fell victim to unreasonable force

To the University of London to hear David Willetts talk about the future of universities. Apparently, the Universities Secretary wanted to cycle to the event but was told to abandon the idea because of the presence of a large number of student demonstrators. When I arrived at Senate House they were noisily chanting near the entrance to the meeting. As I offered identification to a steward, I was grabbed by the arm and forced back against a wall. I was tempted to say "get your hands off me", but a look at the steward's face made me think this might not be a wise move. In the end, a second steward accepted my ID and I was allowed into the meeting.

Rowing: Searle inspires win to earn eights final place

Britain's good start to the world championships in New Zealand continued yesterday as both eights progressed straight through to Sunday's finals – taking Greg Searle one step closer to a remarkable second world title.

Rowing: Hunter and Purchase on march as Britain show their strength

Mark Hunter and Zac Purchase prospered on a fruitful day two for Great Britain as the World Championships in Cambridge, New Zealand kicked into top gear following the previous day's high winds, which had postponed most of the action.

Rowing: Winds wreak havoc at championships

The World Rowing Championships got off to a false start yesterday as the weather presented organisers with a scheduling headache.

Andy Holmes: Rower whose partnership with Steve Redgrave sparked a British renaissance in the sport

Andy Holmes, part of the gold-winning crew at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and gold-winning partner to Steve Redgrave at the 1988 Seoul Olympics, was part of Britain's rowing renaissance and helped provide the foundations on which Britain's now long-standing success in the sport is built. The LA gold ended a 36-year drought in the sport.

Rower who won gold with Redgrave dies of Weil's disease

An Olympic rower who won gold for Britain alongside Si r Steve Redgrave has been killed by the extremely rare Weil's disease. Andy Holmes, a double Olympic champion who won medals in Los Angeles and Seoul, died shortly after his 51st birthday. The chances of catching the disease, which is passed through the urine of infected animals, are incredibly small, but it can be deadly on the few instances when it occurs.

Matthew Norman: What next, trigger-less rifles?

Here’s a suggestion for the Secretary of State. Good doctor, turn the aircraft-less carriers into museums themed on our imperial past. In spirit, that’s what they are anyway

Aliss at the Fire, By Jon Fosse, trans. Damion Searls

Ghosts of the past haunt a quiet tragedy

Rowing: Barbershop boy cuts the mustard

It would be fair to say that rowing, as a sport in which to excel at Olympic level, didn't feature highlyin the imagination of the Kingston-on-Thames schoolboy Mohamed Sbihi. It was always asumed that Sbihi, the son of a Moroccan-born father, also named Mohamed, who owned a barbershop off Regency Street in London's Victoria, would one day go into the family trade.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
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As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

Mussolini tried to warn his ally of the danger of bringing the country to its knees. So should we, says Patrick Cockburn
Britain's widening poverty gap should be causing outrage at the start of the election campaign

The short stroll that should be our walk of shame

Courting the global elite has failed to benefit Britain, as the vast disparity in wealth on display in the capital shows
Homeless Veterans appeal: The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty

Homeless Veterans appeal

The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty
Prince Charles the saviour of the nation? A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king

Prince Charles the saviour of the nation?

A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king
How books can defeat Isis: Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad

How books can defeat Isis

Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad
Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

She may be in charge of minimising our risks of injury, but the chair of the Health and Safety Executive still wants children to be able to hurt themselves
The open loathing between Barack Obama and Benjamin Netanyahu just got worse

The open loathing between Obama and Netanyahu just got worse

The Israeli PM's relationship with the Obama has always been chilly, but going over the President's head on Iran will do him no favours, says Rupert Cornwell
French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

Fury at British best restaurants survey sees French magazine produce a rival list
Star choreographer Matthew Bourne gives young carers a chance to perform at Sadler's Wells

Young carers to make dance debut

What happened when superstar choreographer Matthew Bourne encouraged 27 teenage carers to think about themselves for once?
Design Council's 70th anniversary: Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch

Design Council's 70th anniversary

Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch
Dame Harriet Walter: The actress on learning what it is to age, plastic surgery, and her unease at being honoured by the establishment

Dame Harriet Walter interview

The actress on learning what it is to age, plastic surgery, and her unease at being honoured by the establishment
Art should not be a slave to the ideas driving it

Art should not be a slave to the ideas driving it

Critics of Tom Stoppard's new play seem to agree that cerebral can never trump character, says DJ Taylor
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's winter salads will make you feel energised through February

Bill Granger's winter salads

Salads aren't just a bit on the side, says our chef - their crunch, colour and natural goodness are perfect for a midwinter pick-me-up
England vs Wales: Cool head George Ford ready to put out dragon fire

George Ford: Cool head ready to put out dragon fire

No 10’s calmness under pressure will be key for England in Cardiff
Michael Calvin: Time for Old Firm to put aside bigotry and forge new links

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Time for Old Firm to put aside bigotry and forge new links