Travel St Lawrence beach in Barbados

Take your partner, family, golf clubs… or a good pair of walking boos

Taxi driver died after drinking pure liquid cocaine

A taxi driver died after unwittingly drinking pure liquid cocaine from a rum bottle given to him as a gift, a court heard today.

It's just one long list of things to get done in Anguilla

There's Johnno's on Friday, Pumphouse on Saturday, The Dune on Sunday. Is there any rest for visitors to this Caribbean island? Katy Guest packed it all in

Lemon rice tea cakes

Makes 15

Manson, 676 Fulham Road, London

It seems only yesterday that I was standing in a nondescript side-street in Fulham, looking without enthusiasm at the tatterdemalion exterior of the Harwood Arms gastropub, before walking inside and enjoying one of the best meals of the year. Now here's another overcast day, another lunchtime taxi ride through the anonymous streets of SW6 (where the shops seem to hang their awnings with shame that they're not as classy as their Chelsea neighbours), and what shall we find this time? Will history repeat itself?

Mr Robinson's liming punch

Nick Strangeway knocked this up in Guyana and named it after master distiller George Robinson. We visited the local market for provisions a couple of days before so that Nick could get his pineapple and three-year-old rum infusing nicely.

Free spirit: A trip to Guyana inspired Mark Hix's sensational rum-based menu

This week I'm writing about a recent break that I took to a wonderful rum distillery in Guyana. What with my tequila mission to Mexico last year, as well as quite a few wine trips abroad, it's true that many of my excursions are based around alcohol, but I justify them by telling myself that having a full understanding of all the types of alcohol in the world is an integral part of my job – at least that's my story, and I'm sticking to it.

Diageo accuses Bacardi of rum behaviour

Diageo has launched a blistering attack on rival Bacardi, accusing it of leading a "hidden campaign" for commercial gain that would "kill" off a series of lucrative tax excises that the maker of Captain Morgan rum would receive by shifting production from Puerto Rico to the US Virgin Islands.

Cocktail: NY toast

Borrowing from the claret snap in a New York sour, this gently spiced drink is a perfect tipple hand to usher in the New Year.

Bacardi and the Long Fight for Cuba, By Tom Gjelten

Though its rum is now made in Puerto Rico, the name Bacardi is inextricably associated with Cuba. The company was founded in Santiago de Cuba in 1862 by Facundo Bacardi, a rum-maker and revolutionary determined to overthrow Spanish colonialists.

Album: Sweet Billy Pilgrim, Twice Born Men, (Samahdi Sound)

uckinghamshire landlubbers they may be, but SBP - whose debut album is reissued following its Mercury nomination - pursue a notably nautical theme on Twice Born Men that stretches far beyond the illustration of a storm-tossed schooner which adorns its David Sylvian-designed sleeve. The trio's brooding folk-pop, intertwined with Tim Elsenburg's Guy Garveyish vocals (perhaps too Garveyish for victory, so hold on to your betting money) pitches and rolls like a ship on the waves. A dark rum pleasure.

Great Sporting Moments: Red Rum's third Grand National win, Aintree, 2 April, 1977

Few triumphs have warmed so many hearts as Red Rum's third famous victory at Aintree. Chris McGrath celebrates one of the great sporting fairy tales

Cocktails remixed: Exotic molecular mixology

They've come a long way since Tom Cruise's heyday – more molecular mixology than happy hour. Claire Soares learns how to shake and stir with Britain's best bartender

Threshers fails to deliver for franchisees

Stores fear for future as troubled off-licence chain is unable to fulfil stock orders

On The Road: Rum packs a punch in idyllic Grenada

The sunset is reflecting gold across the bay, twinkling lights flicker on the lapping water. Yachts in the nearby marina announce their presence with a distinctive twang, as rigging pings against masts.

Grand fromage: Alain Ducasse flies the flag for classic French haute cuisine

For a man who is, by general consent, the most distinguished French chef in the world, who holds 15 Michelin stars, has published 16 cookbooks and inspired no fewer than 27 restaurants, Alain Ducasse is a strangely low-key figure. World-famous as a brand, he is virtually anonymous as a person. Gourmets who could talk for hours about his Pithiviers de canard et foie gras would find it hard to identify him in a police line-up. He may have trained a generation of chefs who run key London restaurants (Hélène Darroze at the Connaught, Claude Bosi at Hibiscus, Alexis Gauthier at Roussillon) but you'll never see him on reality TV shows, like his countryman Raymond Blanc.

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