Arts and Entertainment John and Sherlock look pensive in 'The Sign of Three'

The third series of Sherlock has become the most-watched drama run in over a decade, the BBC said today.

From William Gillette to Benedict Cumberbatch: The changing face of Sherlock Holmes

Sir Arthur Conan-Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes has remained in the popular consciousness for nearly 125 years. The tales of murder and intrigue have endured because they enthral readers, viewers and listeners today as much as the Victorian audiences they were written for.

The Secret of Sherlock Holmes, Duchess Theatre, London

What is happening to Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson? They have been updated on television, by Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman, having endured the mixed blessing of a louche makeover by Robert Downey Jr and Jude Law in last year's movie.

Location location location: UK's top cinematic spots

Britain is blessed with a variety of landscapes that can change, sometimes dramatically, within short distances. Close enough to the studios of Pinewood and Shepperton, Egypt has been filmed on the sand of Frensham Large Pond whilst across the water Russia has been shot amongst the pine trees and silver birches of Frensham Little Pond.

Britain's box office booms but filming is set to slow

The UK Film Council is predicting another bumper year for production in 2010, despite a slowdown of features in the first half and cinema admissions hit by the World Cup.

Sherlock Holmes: Why mess with the fabulous Baker Street boys?

Holmes and Watson are back in a BBC drama. The reasons we shouldn't update them are elementary, says Gerard Gilbert

Elementary, my dear boy: An investigation into Sherlock Holmes' early years

Arthur Conan Doyle never explained why his most famous creation was a 'drug-addicted bipolar maverick' – but Andrew Lane, the author of the new Young Sherlock Holmes series, is following a few leads...

UK film industry warns against tax relief removal

The film industry brought in billions of pounds to the UK economy last year but a cut to tax breaks could see growth collapse, according to a report from Oxford Economics.

And Then There Was No One, By Gilbert Adair

Gilbert Adair found his true calling with his trilogy of Agatha Christie knock-offs involving the lesbian novelist Evadne Mount. They are, in varying degrees, pastiche, tribute and form-fiddling self-indulgence.

Dress Code: Jenny Beavan, Costume Designer

What are you wearing right now?

A homage to M & S! All black - it is safest when one is not the smallest - and some good ethnic silver necklaces.

DVD: Sherlock Holmes (12)

Robert Downey Jr and Jude Law make an unlikely pairing in the latest incarnation of the detective and his sidekick, Dr Watson, but by gum it works. The sleuth investigates murders that seem to have been carried out by Lord Blackwood, a worshipper of the dark arts. The only problem being, the peer had been executed before the spree. The tale may not be from the pen of Arthur Conan Doyle, but is an enjoyable romp, rattling along at a cracking pace, and the look of Victorian London is sumptuous. Fans of the source material might cry foul, but this is a welcome – if slightly leftfield – addition to the Holmes canon, and, after a fallow decade, a return to form for Guy Ritchie.

DVD: Sherlock Holmes, For retail & rental (Warner)

In Guy Ritchie's rollicking adventure, Holmes (Robert Downey Jnr) is reinvented as a wild-eyed, unhygienic crackpot, while Watson (Jude Law) is a tough war veteran with a gambling habit and a love-hate relationship with his barmy flatmate.

Iron Man 2, Jon Favreau, 124 mins (12A) <br/>Valhalla Rising, Nicolas Winding Refn, 89 mins (15)

Robert Downey Jr's hi-tech anti-hero hardly lets Mickey Rourke's Russian villain get a word in edgeways in this noisy, brash yet entertaining comic-book sequel

Nobody's mug: How did Eddie Marsan become Hollywood's go-to man for great British character acting?

Eddie Marsan would probably agree that his face is his fortune. He is one of those film actors you can't always put a name to, but you'll instantly recognise that cartoon countenance: wide with low ears, flattened nose and crestfallen mouth, liable to look meek or mean depending on how the wind is blowing. It is the sort of face that nature has provided with its own stocking mask.

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