Arts and Entertainment Macklemore and Ryan Lewis

Winners in selected categories at the 56th annual Grammy Awards announced Sunday during ceremonies at the Nokia Theatre and Staples Center were as follows:

Album: Just Jack, All Night Cinema, (Mercury)

"I never defined myself as a rapper," says Jack Allsopp, but as "a singer-songwriter who had a little bit more to say".

The lost legends of American soft rock

As 1980s pop stars from Britain leap on to the crowded revivalist bandwagon, Ben Walsh wonders what happened to their US cousins

Guilty – of being a black world champion

Jack Johnson's name has been tarnished for a century by allegations trumped up by his white enemies. Now Obama is being asked to pardon him

Kenny Rankin: Guitarist and singer who played with Bob Dylan

Many of the reviews of Kenny Rankin's dozen albums compare him to James Taylor and certainly he fits into that soft rock, easy listening mould. He was as much influenced by the pre-war songwriters as his contemporaries, however, and this quality is noted both in his own songs and in the standards which he recorded. Paul McCartney was impressed with his exquisite versions of Beatle songs such as "Blackbird" and asked him to collect an award for Lennon and McCartney from the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1987.

Album: Rodriguez, Coming from Reality (Light in the Attic)

Sixto Rodriguez may represent the most unlikely disinterral of hidden hippie rock genius since the likes of Drake and Buckley became household names.

Dan Seals: Member of the soft-rock duo England Dan and John Ford Coley

The singer-songwriter Dan Seals was one half of the Seventies soft-rock duo England Dan and John Ford Coley. In Britain they had two hit singles, the yearning "I'd Really Love to See You Tonight" (1976), and the gorgeous "Love is the Answer" (1979), and they had even greater success in the United States. The pair broke up in 1980 and Seals went on to a solo career in country music, topping the country charts 11 times, most notably with "Meet Me in Montana", a duet with Marie Osmond, in 1985.

Album: Vetiver, Tight Knit, (Bella Union)

It was never going to be easy to follow up a debut album that featured Devendra Banhart and Joanna Newsom, and, sure enough, Andy Cabic's fourth Vetiver album finds the San Francisco-based musician treading water.

The Script, Shepherds Bush Empire, London <br>The Fray, Borderline, London

Every time I see this many people, I think we're the support act," says The Script's guitarist Mark Sheehan, staring out at the hardly vast Shepherds Bush Empire. But on their previous visits, they were indeed supporting the dull likes of The Hoosiers and Newton Faulkner. That was before their self-titled debut album hit No 1 here and in their native Ireland.

Bryan Adams makes harassment complaint

Police are investigating a harassment complaint made by Canadian rocker Bryan Adams.

Observations: Music to save the world by

So what do you get for the Doctor Who fan who already has the DVDs, sonic screwdriver, remote-controlled Dalek and life-size cardboard cut-out of a Cyberman? Well, there's always the soundtrack to Series Four, composed by four times Bafta-nominated Murray Gold. It's unlikely to convert those who objected to the Doctor Who Prom this year – the soft rock of "UNIT Rocks" and Carmina Burana-esque "The Dark and Endless Dalek Night" are a long way from Wagner – but Gold is rightly noted for his television work, having collaborated with Russell T Davies on Queer as Folk and Casanova.

Robbie Williams plagued by Little and Large dreams



Robbie Williams has been plagued by recurring dreams about comedy duo Little and Large, according to Syd Little.

Album: Pete Greenwood, Sirens (Heavenly)

While every singer-songwriter seems to have a backstory to tell, there's something refreshingly simple about Pete Greenwood's history: "Born in Leeds, moved to London, came across a nice guitar, wrote a bunch of songs," he summarises. This debut album entirely reflects that understated and dignified approach. It's James Taylor folk-ish in the main, but Greenwood is not afraid to go California cowboy and even at one point ("Bats Over Barstow") manages to sound like a Velvet Underground hoe down. Born in Leeds, moved to London? Who's he trying to kid?

Album: The Script, The Script (RCA)

London-based Dublin trio The Script like to characterise their music as "Celtic Soul", but this debut album is light years away from Van or Dexy's or The Hothouse Flowers.

James Taylor Night, BBC4 <br />The Invisibles, BBC1<br />Britain's Youngest Grannies, BBC3<br />Peep Show, Channel 4

A night devoted to James Taylor showed the old folkie's magic can still charm &ndash; unlike a peep behind the scenes at maison Austen

Cultural Life: Amy Macdonald, singer

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I just bought the new Guillemots album Red. I really loved their first album, Through the Windowpane. I also have the new Hot Chip album, Made in the Dark; I love the single "Ready For the Floor". I've started listening to my Bruce Springsteen collection again.

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