News Mother Teresa: Skopje also has plans for a huge statue of the nun, who was born in the city

Not content with four-storey statues of Alexander the Great and Mother Teresa, city planners in Skopje are now inviting bids for a version of Rome’s Spanish Steps, part of a beautification campaign that has divided residents.

Arrested Mumbai gunmen 'of British descent'

Two gunmen arrested after the Mumbai massacre were of British descent, the country's chief minister said today.

India move test from Mumbai to Chennai

The Indian cricket board has switched the second test against England to Chennai from Mumbai in the wake of the Mumbai attacks.

England head home in wake of Mumbai attacks

Pietersen's side to fly back but Test series against India still scheduled to go ahead

Anil Dharker: In Mumbai's teeming history lies the hope for our recovery

The resilience of this great cosmopolitan city has been tested like never before

Tycoon who described horror of attacks named as British victim

As gunmen tore through the corridors of Mumbai's exclusive Taj Mahal Hotel, Andreas Liveras, a British multimillionaire, was one of the guests who managed to describe the terrifying events to the outside world.

Tourism: Images that threaten a flourishing trade

The targeting of British and US nationals at luxury hotels in Mumbai may have serious consequences for tourism in the region.

Three gunmen killed as India hotel siege ends

Indian commandos killed the last three gunmen at the landmark Taj Mahal hotel in Mumbai this evening after suspected Muslim militants stormed targets across the city.

At least 78 dead in Mumbai 'terror attacks'

At least 78 people were killed and 200 injured today when gunmen opened fire on a crowded Mumbai railway station, luxury hotels and a restaurant popular with tourists.

Watchdog raps BAA over running of Stansted but allows fee increase

The Competition Commission has ruled in favour of increasing charges at Stansted over the next five years, putting paid to Ryanair's long-running campaign for lower levies at its main UK base. Airlines operating out of Stansted will pay BAA, which runs it, an increase from £6.34 to £6.56 in 2009-10 and to a maximum of £7.05 by 2014.

Paperback: A Teardrop on the Cheek of Time, by Diana & Michael Preston

Although billed as a history of the Taj Mahal, the Prestons' richly patterned chintz of a book also delivers a romantic account of the Mughal empire as a whole. It treats the moment in the 1630s when the grief-stricken Shah Jahan built the marble tomb of his beloved wife, Mumtaz, as a pivot for the story of their love, their dynasty, and its spectacular rise and fall. Edward Lear thought it "simply silly" to describe the Taj, this "wonderfully lovely place". The Prestons – though sometimes prone to lush hyperbole – succeed far better than most.

From one African legend to another

The Malian kora master Toumani Diabaté won a Grammy for his collaboration with Ali Farka Touré. In Spain for a rare solo show, he tells Tim Cumming about his new CD, dedicated to Touré and others, and explains why he never plays a piece the same way twice

Pick of the picture books: 80 Gardens, by Monty Don

A travelogue from the perspective that "the most interesting thing to be found in any garden is the person that made it", this is not about world's "best" gardens, but the ones that say the most about the planet's diverse and wonderful gardeners. Around The World In 80 Gardens by Monty Don (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £20) takes in six continents (Antarctica not being a gardener's paradise) to prove the author's theory that "people are always more interesting than plants". Don is a curious and engaging guide, as thrilled by the ad hoc floating vegetable plots of the Amazon (right) as by formal Zen gardens in Kyoto or the Moonlight Garden of the Taj Mahal. "If I have only learnt one thing from my travels around the world, it is that no garden is an island," he writes. "Context is everything."

The Bucket List, 12A

Smile for the camera, and say cheesy: Jack and Morgan may be on autopilot, but Julie really knows how to fly

Why the Ashes of 2005 is the best Test series in cricket history

The current series has captured the imagination in an unprecedented way but is it the best ever? Peter Roebuck gives an (almost) definitive answer

Curry: a biography by Lizzie Collingham

What's an authentic curry? As Bill Saunders discovers, outsiders created Indian cuisine
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone
Amazon is buying Twitch for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?

What is the appeal of Twitch?

Amazon is buying the video-game-themed online streaming site for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?
Tip-tapping typewriters, ripe pongs and slides in the office: Bosses are inventing surprising ways of making us work harder

How bosses are making us work harder

As it is revealed that one newspaper office pumps out the sound of typewriters to increase productivity, Gillian Orr explores the other devices designed to motivate staff
Manufacturers are struggling to keep up with the resurgence in vinyl records

Hard pressed: Resurgence in vinyl records

As the resurgence in vinyl records continues, manufacturers and their outdated machinery are struggling to keep up with the demand
Tony Jordan: 'I turned down the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series nine times ... then I found a kindred spirit'

A tale of two writers

Offered the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series, Tony Jordan turned it down. Nine times. The man behind EastEnders and Life on Mars didn’t feel right for the job. Finally, he gave in - and found an unexpected kindred spirit
Could a later start to the school day be the most useful educational reform of all?

Should pupils get a lie in?

Doctors want a later start to the school day so that pupils can sleep later. Not because teenagers are lazy, explains Simon Usborne - it's all down to their circadian rhythms
Prepare for Jewish jokes – as Jewish comedians get their own festival

Prepare for Jewish jokes...

... as Jewish comedians get their own festival
SJ Watson: 'I still can't quite believe that Before I Go to Sleep started in my head'

A dream come true for SJ Watson

Watson was working part time in the NHS when his debut novel, Before I Go to Sleep, became a bestseller. Now it's a Hollywood movie, too. Here he recalls the whirlwind journey from children’s ward to A-list film set
10 best cycling bags for commuters

10 best cycling bags for commuters

Gear up for next week’s National Cycle to Work day with one of these practical backpacks and messenger bags
Paul Scholes: Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United

Paul Scholes column

Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United
Kate Bush, Hammersmith Apollo music review: A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it

Kate Bush shows a voice untroubled by time

A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it
Robot sheepdog technology could be used to save people from burning buildings

The science of herding is cracked

Mathematical model would allow robots to be programmed to control crowds and save people from burning buildings
Tyrant: Is the world ready for a Middle Eastern 'Dallas'?

This tyrant doesn’t rule

It’s billed as a Middle Eastern ‘Dallas’, so why does Fox’s new drama have a white British star?