News Mother Teresa: Skopje also has plans for a huge statue of the nun, who was born in the city

Not content with four-storey statues of Alexander the Great and Mother Teresa, city planners in Skopje are now inviting bids for a version of Rome’s Spanish Steps, part of a beautification campaign that has divided residents.

Arrested Mumbai gunmen 'of British descent'

Two gunmen arrested after the Mumbai massacre were of British descent, the country's chief minister said today.

India move test from Mumbai to Chennai

The Indian cricket board has switched the second test against England to Chennai from Mumbai in the wake of the Mumbai attacks.

England head home in wake of Mumbai attacks

Pietersen's side to fly back but Test series against India still scheduled to go ahead

Anil Dharker: In Mumbai's teeming history lies the hope for our recovery

The resilience of this great cosmopolitan city has been tested like never before

Tycoon who described horror of attacks named as British victim

As gunmen tore through the corridors of Mumbai's exclusive Taj Mahal Hotel, Andreas Liveras, a British multimillionaire, was one of the guests who managed to describe the terrifying events to the outside world.

Tourism: Images that threaten a flourishing trade

The targeting of British and US nationals at luxury hotels in Mumbai may have serious consequences for tourism in the region.

Three gunmen killed as India hotel siege ends

Indian commandos killed the last three gunmen at the landmark Taj Mahal hotel in Mumbai this evening after suspected Muslim militants stormed targets across the city.

At least 78 dead in Mumbai 'terror attacks'

At least 78 people were killed and 200 injured today when gunmen opened fire on a crowded Mumbai railway station, luxury hotels and a restaurant popular with tourists.

Watchdog raps BAA over running of Stansted but allows fee increase

The Competition Commission has ruled in favour of increasing charges at Stansted over the next five years, putting paid to Ryanair's long-running campaign for lower levies at its main UK base. Airlines operating out of Stansted will pay BAA, which runs it, an increase from £6.34 to £6.56 in 2009-10 and to a maximum of £7.05 by 2014.

Paperback: A Teardrop on the Cheek of Time, by Diana & Michael Preston

Although billed as a history of the Taj Mahal, the Prestons' richly patterned chintz of a book also delivers a romantic account of the Mughal empire as a whole. It treats the moment in the 1630s when the grief-stricken Shah Jahan built the marble tomb of his beloved wife, Mumtaz, as a pivot for the story of their love, their dynasty, and its spectacular rise and fall. Edward Lear thought it "simply silly" to describe the Taj, this "wonderfully lovely place". The Prestons – though sometimes prone to lush hyperbole – succeed far better than most.

From one African legend to another

The Malian kora master Toumani Diabaté won a Grammy for his collaboration with Ali Farka Touré. In Spain for a rare solo show, he tells Tim Cumming about his new CD, dedicated to Touré and others, and explains why he never plays a piece the same way twice

Pick of the picture books: 80 Gardens, by Monty Don

A travelogue from the perspective that "the most interesting thing to be found in any garden is the person that made it", this is not about world's "best" gardens, but the ones that say the most about the planet's diverse and wonderful gardeners. Around The World In 80 Gardens by Monty Don (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £20) takes in six continents (Antarctica not being a gardener's paradise) to prove the author's theory that "people are always more interesting than plants". Don is a curious and engaging guide, as thrilled by the ad hoc floating vegetable plots of the Amazon (right) as by formal Zen gardens in Kyoto or the Moonlight Garden of the Taj Mahal. "If I have only learnt one thing from my travels around the world, it is that no garden is an island," he writes. "Context is everything."

The Bucket List, 12A

Smile for the camera, and say cheesy: Jack and Morgan may be on autopilot, but Julie really knows how to fly

Why the Ashes of 2005 is the best Test series in cricket history

The current series has captured the imagination in an unprecedented way but is it the best ever? Peter Roebuck gives an (almost) definitive answer

Curry: a biography by Lizzie Collingham

What's an authentic curry? As Bill Saunders discovers, outsiders created Indian cuisine
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent