News David Icke has launched The People's Voice, a new free internet TV station

Conspiracy theorist says new station will 'give people who are currently voiceless in the mainstream media their say'

The Critics - Radio: Home truths? I'll give him home truths

Radio, a medium whose practitioners crave love and attention like anyone else, has its own Oscars in the form of the Sony Awards. This is a big black-tie shindig in Grosvenor House, London, only slightly warped in that when you want to sidle up to someone famous, you have to listen out for their voices rather than look out for their faces. Apart, of course, for that noted radio personality, Caprice. She had to be there because no media event can strictly be said to have taken place without Caprice's appearance at some stage in the proceedings.

Football: Another fine mess for Stanley, despite the laurels

Ronald Atkin finds Accrington's pride in good shape but on the way down

The Partridge family

Local Radio: The comic creation Alan Partridge showed us the hell that is regional radio. But is it really like that? In fact, most of Britain's radios are tuned to provincial stations, and the people responsible for that success are the presenters. Michaacks down radio's local heroes

Stalker targeted radio celebrities before death

A BUSINESSMAN accused of stalking the television presenter Ulrika Jonsson also bombarded Terry Wogan and other BBC Radio 2 personalities with bizarre letters and gifts before his death last month, it emerged yesterday.

Why are they famous: Jane McDonald

Main claim

At last, an end to feudalism

The Highlands teem with foreign lairds, bristling with anger at the ingratitude of their serfs

The Critics' Awards 1998: Radio - Open your eyes to the airwaves

Like contact lenses, radio works directly on the brain, with no intervening distractions. It can transport you through time and space, into palaces and prisons, across barriers of class, sex, age and agility. It can inform, engross, encourage and delight. R3's Danube Week did all that and more, taking the listener to the concert-halls, monasteries, opera houses, ballrooms and bars of Vienna and Budapest, and elegantly displaying the grandeur of the Austro-Hungarian empire in its modern European context. Its begetter, John Evans, gets my top prize.

Racing: Venetia's command performance

TERRY WOGAN once asked whether the sun only shone on Ron Atkinson's part of Manchester. Yesterday, as she stood in the rain without getting wet, the reverse question could be asked about Miss Venetia Williams. It didn't seem to rain on her part of Kempton. She stood there, reluctant to infiltrate the next day's headlines, as acolytes and hacks huddled round, drenched to the bone. But not a drop seemed to fall on her jet black hair or to soak her red and yellow tartan jacket.

Ross replaces Norman. And why not?

BARRY NORMAN had a leather armchair. Jonathan Ross, unveiled by the BBC yesterday as its chief film reviewer's successor, gets a black sofa. And why not?

Football: Plymouth win blankety blank

Kidderminster Harriers 0 Plymouth Argyle 0 after extra time; Plymouth win 5-4 on penalties

The week in radio: Live and dangerously breathtaking

There's a sad little rhyme about an innocent film-goer in the 1940s: "She didn't care much for the brave and the strong - less still for the burning kiss. But she'd sit in the cinema all day long, in the hope that the character beating the gong would miss." At the Albert Hall I once saw the character bashing the tubular bells miss, during an exposed passage towards the end of Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique. My guilty glee was soon replaced by a sense of awe that everybody else was getting it right.

On Air: No more Mr Nice Guy

He may have made his career out of playing losers, but now Stephen Tomkinson is firmly on the winning side. By James Rampton

Arts: Friends, countrymen, lend me your ears

Proms: THE LAST NIGHT; BBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA AND CHORUS BBC SINGERS ROYAL ALBERT HALL

Why Are They Famous ? - Gloria Hunniford

Main Claim: Middle-of-the-road empress of blarney. Like a blonde Terry Wogan, Gloria's brand of smoothly polished populism has secured her a steady niche in soft broadcasting. A way with a dazzling smile, a smooth phrase, and a housewife-pleasing genius for light entertainment make her the consummate professional. Now Gloria has married at the ripe old age of 58-but-you'd-never-guess-it, wedding some millionaire crimper fellow. Gloria surprised us all by arriving in a horse-drawn carriage. James Galway played Danny Boy, and Cliff Richard read the lesson. You get the picture, readers. "I feel wonderful, absolutely on top on the world," said Gloria. New husband: "I found a woman with beauty, brains and a soul."

Potter may have written his own biography. Who knows?

Leave the fatalistic shoulder-shrugging to me, IF you don't mind. Next!
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