Voices Anti Clause 28 March and Demonstration, London, 1988

During the 15 years in which Section 28 was law, no local authority was prosecuted

A question of black and white influences

Are Oasis the new Beatles, then? Some would say Blur's more baroque, vaudevillian arrangements are more closely reflective of the late-period Beatles style, but there's no denying that when it comes to writing brilliantly simple pop songs, Noel Gallagher has Damon Albarn beaten hands down every time, writes Andy Gill.

Rough for Diamonds

Non-League notebook:

ROCK: Ex-Blondies have more fun

FIRST THERE was Debbie Harry. Then there was Deborah Harry. Now, as Deborah Harry and the Jazz Passengers, the original rock babe has become ... the Baroness von Swimmingbag.

Show goes on for Manics

JOHN MCKIE

The critics ROCK: The Stone Roses: a turn up for the books

WHAT can I say about the Stone Roses at the Cambridge Corn Exchange? Fantastic! Unprecedented! Miraculous! Yes, the band turned up.

ARTS; THE OLD KIDS ON THE BLOCK

Oasis want to be them, the Boo Radleys sound like them, everybody else has haircuts like them. But if you're under 25, you may not be too sure who the Beatles actually were. Our (young) guide explains it all

When a Seal beats a Walrus

ROCK

mod

No August Bank Holiday at the British seaside was ever complete without the wheeled armies of Mods and Rockers. A dubious tradition has ended, but the cult of Mod has endured, in pop music and fashion. Paolo Hewitt examines the origins of the species

Never say dead in the water

It took REM five albums to become big stars. Why not the Charlatans? Emma Forrest on the fourth instalment of a baggy campaign

Pop Luke Clancy THE STONE ROSES Pirc U Chaoimh, Cork

After a rash of courtroom scuffles, a plague of feeble bones and a brief tour of Scandinavia, the Stone Roses finally loped onto the stage of Pirc U Chaoimh, Cork, last Sunday, to play their first gig in these islands for more than half a decade.

Hook, line and cymbal crash: pop stars and the law

It was one of Michael Jackson's more brilliant performances. On 14 February 1994, he gave a private a cappella rendition of one of his bigger selling hits to a privileged audience of 12. Normally he performed to several thousand times that number, but on this occasion his effort was worthwhile: so charmed, so thrilled, so won over were the jury in the Denver court house, they had to be restrained from giving him a standing ovation. Jackson had been called to the witness box to show how he went about writing music and performed "Billie Jean" (a song inspired by a paternity suit) to prove that even the mad have method. So enamoured were the jury (and indeed the judge who later asked for an autograph - for his son, he claimed) that they threw out the claim by songwriter Crystal Cartier that Wacko had stolen the idea for "Dangerous" from him. It is just as well that Jackson is adept in the witness box. Since the $26m payout to Jordy Chandler proved his vulnerability to our learned friends, he might well be spending more time there. He presently has $700m worth of law suits out against his person for a variety of sins varying from harrassing former staff to harrassing small boys. Not to mention claims on file that he stole every hook, line and cymbal crash of his written output.

'I'd envisaged Bryan Ferry slaving over a sewing-machine to all hours'

DICKIE FANTASTIC ON THE SCHMOOZE

Monkee business

Teenage Fanclub The Junction, Cambridge

ROCK : What those seeing Bernard Butler saw

OPENING for McAlmont and Butler at the Hanover Grand on Tuesday was Edwyn Collins, once of Orange Juice, now more bitter lemon. As romantic as a tax demand, he sneered through "The Campaign for Real Rock", word- playing rough with "Robert Zimmerframe" and a generation whose "idea of counter-culture is Momma's charge account at Sears". "These lyrics are written to be quoted by rock critics," someone near me muttered, which was embarrassing as I had lifted a couplet from that very song to use in last week's paper.

Pop shots

Next time you're mooching around the Virgin Megastore, squinting at the tiny artist photos on badly printed CD inlays and wondering if the artists are actually good looking enough for you to buy their wares, worry not. Put away that scanning electron microscope and skip up to the second floor, where your senses will be assaulted, at no cost to your sensitive pocket, by the Q Photographic Exhibition. Massive prints of classic Q shots of famous artists over the years will be hanging on the wall in the brand- new gallery space, in stunning colour and trs cool black-and-white - shots of Blur, the Rolling Stones, Michael Stipe, Leonard Cohen, Paul Weller and many more. Even the Stone Roses (above left), although their emulsion compulsion didn't stretch as far as, say, getting out of bed and putting on some decent clobber. Q photographer Ken Sharpe says of the 1990 shoot: "It was really strange because they were really obnoxious and arrogant... [but] as soon as we'd finished, they all turned really nice..." Such are the winsome vagaries of rock and, if you will, roll photography.
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