The Stone Roses

V Festival, Hylands Park, Chelmsford

If you are expecting a deep and meaningful experience from a music festival like glastonbury or Green Man, you’re not going to find it at V.

T in the Park, Balado, Near Kinross

When Glastonbury takes a year off, smaller festivals have a chance to mark out for themselves as much of the massive void left behind as possible.

Ian Brown: The third coming

The Stone Roses are as famous for their feuds as their music. But what else would you expect with a singer whose ego is the stuff of legend?

Album: Radiohead, KOL RMX 1234567 (XL)

If Radiohead's The King of Limbs wasn't quite abstruse enough for you, then this could be just what you're waiting for: 19 remixes of its eight tracks by dubstep and avant-rock producers – the best-known being Caribou, Four Tet and Modeselektor – most of whom seem to adopt the inscrutable manner of "Feral", whichever track they're remixing.

Agenda: Chanel nail varnish; Elena Anaya; Lollibop; John Squire

Another season, another must-have Chanel nail varnish. This summer, talons are set to be painted mimosa yellow – a tricky shade to pull off, and therefore one which seems to have found a natural home on the fingertips of the It-crowd. Elsewhere in the range, there are gentle pinks and bubblegum shades – the perfect foil to all the bright, Pantone shades on the catwalks for spring. Les Fleurs d'Eté de Chanel, available now, from £17.50,

Curse of The Charlatans strikes again as drummer is diagnosed with

They should have been celebrating two decades of defying the odds as one of the most enduring features of British indie rock. But instead The Charlatans, who once described themselves as "the unluckiest band in pop", announced yesterday that their drummer had been diagnosed with a brain tumour.

More headlines

Liam Maher: Lead singer with the 1990s 'baggy' band Flowered Up

When Flowered Up formed on a Camden council estate in 1989, they didn't seem to have much of an agenda beyond "a few good gigs and some laughs", as their lead vocalist Liam Maher put it two years later. Yet the London band managed to encapsulate the hedonistic spirit of the acid house generation to perfection in 1992 with the 13-minute epic "Weekender", their sole Top 20 entry. That year, they appeared at two Madstock events in London's Finsbury Park but the New Musical Express chose to sensationalise Morrissey's antics with a Union Jack on the first day rather than draw the obvious parallels between Ian Dury and the Blockheads, also on the bill, and Madness, the headliners, and Flowered Up, then the latest in a direct line of culturally significant groups from the capital.

Reading Festival: Radiohead's modern jazz wrong-foots the crowd

In a festival heavy on over-familiar or unimpressive bands, it was left to last night's closing act Radiohead to wrong-foot everyone. The odds on their angst-ridden singer Thom Yorke's first words being "Whassup?" followed by the initial hit song they've all but disowned, "Creep", would have been prohibitively long.