Voices Anti Clause 28 March and Demonstration, London, 1988

During the 15 years in which Section 28 was law, no local authority was prosecuted

All you need is pot, says McCartney

CANNABIS, not LSD, was the creative force behind the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts' Club Band album, Sir Paul McCartney revealed last night, writes Tarquin Cooper.

Theatre review: Throwing the baby out with the bath water

Goodnight Children Everywhere Other Place, Stratford-upon-Avon

This is the planet of sound

They never shifted those units in Oasis-scale lorry loads but the Pixies' influence on British and US music has been far more pervasive. Anthony Thornton talks to their inspirational singer/ songwriter, the artist formerly known as Black Francis

PopMart's big, but by no means bad

The advance word on U2's current world tour was that we were in for a treat, but only if our idea of fun was to see the biggest band in existence fall flat on their faces. American articles gloated about slow- selling tickets, cancelled concerts, an ill- conceived stage set, and a band who spent more time trimming their moustaches than rehearsing. Having seen Bono and co at Wembley Stadium, I can reassure anyone going to the Edinburgh show that there's no need to worry, and I can warn the vultures that they may go hungry. It's official: the PopMart tour is no disaster.

ROCK & COMEDY: Hurricane? For a real breath of fresh air, go to Edinburgh

At least he's honest. When a journalist asked Andy Bell to sum up the music of his new band, Hurricane #1, he answered: "We take the Stone Roses dance side and combine it with the Oasis guitar angle." A refreshing change from the stance of Embrace - "Oasis? Never heard of them" - but an admission, nonetheless, that Hurricane #1 are not so much a breath of fresh air as a group who know which way the wind is blowing.

Cricket: Shadford shows his pace

Worcestershire 100-7

live review: Seahorses Kentish Town Forum, London

`They're far better than those second-raters who sully the charts like Oasis afterbirth'

Still hip to be Squire

After the nasty demise of the Stone Roses, guitarist John Squire didn't go solo; he formed the Seahorses and embraced the Gallaghers. By Barbara Ellen

POP&JAZZ

Horace Andy, Jazz Cafe, London NW1 (0171-344 0044), tonight to 29 April

All social work, and no real play; THEATRE

InThe Positive Hour, a new play by April de Angelis at the Hampstead Theatre, a social worker organises sessions where you sit round in a semi-circle and talk about what you really feel. There are all sorts of things, it emerges, to sit in semi-circles and worry about: gender, empowerment, sisterhood, single-parenthood, marriage, prostitution and sado-masochism. In Max Stafford-Clark's production of The Positive Hour, we are brought face to face with relevant issues about the modern female experience. This isn't quite the same thing as watching a play.

THEATRE: Babycakes, Tron Theatre, Glasgow (0141-552 4267) to Sun. The Drill Hall, London (0171-637 8270) from Tue

"We were terrified. That's a wee understatement for you." Unless the afterlife really does exist, Andrew Davies will never have to argue his case with Jane Austen or George Eliot. Not so John Binnie. His adaptation of Babycakes, the fourth volume of Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City, has just opened and he and his company, Clyde Unity Theatre, had the pleasure of the author's company for the last four days of rehearsal.

new kids on the block

Will the men from the Ministry triumph or will clubbers rediscover the life and soul of the party? Will the Britpop big boys continue to hog the limelight? Who will influence what we wear, and who will be the next gay icon (or dykon)? We unveil the alternative faces of 1997

Not a very good year for the Roses

The Critics: ROCK

Theatre Review: Shining Souls Traverse Theatre

Love, it seems, will always find a way. Still. Yet it's an uphill struggle for everyone in Chris Hannan's bravely commercial but clever new play - his first for five years - as the tangles and tatters of screwed up 1990s affairs are exposed in all their ignominy. Anne Mary is getting wed to Billy, who brings her flowers and says pretty things. But her other beau, also called Billy, has talked her into calling it off. The purchase of a wardrobe will sort things out, but the fates are against them from the off. Meanwhile, perennial hustler Charlie inadvertently prophesies his mother's impending demise while scrounging a tenner off his ex. A suit must be bought.
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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee