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One of that select band of British pianists to achieve international recognition, Bernard Roberts was in constant demand as a recitalist, chamber musician, accompanist, concerto soloist and teacher. He was acclaimed by audiences and critics, the remarkable breadth of his industry bringing greater recognition for the instrument itself and proving pivotal in inspiring generations of aspiring performers.

Alexander Melnikov, Wigmore Hall, London<br/>Robert Holl, Wigmore Hall, London

A pianist propelled to stardom and a singer at the height of his powers prove experience will out

Alexander Melnikov, Wigmore Hall

Shostakovich’s ‘24 Preludes and Fugues’ may be seldom performed, but they are one of the miracles of twentieth-century pianism, and their genesis was suitably strange.

Thomas Zehetmair/Ruth Kilius, Wigmore Hall

Bigger than the violin, the viola is tuned a fifth lower, with a darker, warmer sound, and with richer harmonics: while the violin flies high, the viola can connect us to the earth.

Milos Karadaglic: No bombs but still fretting

Next week sees the release of the debut CD of a young Montenegrin guitarist whose playing is as gracefully distinguished as his dark good looks. For those of us who heard Milos Karadaglic's Wigmore Hall recital last year, the impending stardom of this remarkable musician will come as no surprise.

Rare cause for celebration in Japan after Victoire Pisa wins

Lucrative victory in the desert sparks emotional scenes after race for $10m prize ifts some of the worry following natural disasters

Tears in triumph after Japanese 1-2

World Cup ends in victory for Victoire Pisa ahead of compatriot Transcend

Reformed recluse Wigmore takes to the global stage

Once a 'savage' who refused to leave his yard, Michael Bell's gelding now has the world at his feet

Nash Ensemble/Richard Rodney Bennett, Wigmore Hall

Three classical premieres followed by a jazz bash for Britain’s most prolific crossover-composer: thus does the Nash Ensemble celebrate the 75th birthday of one of its most successful sons. Where would British music have been without the Nash? Artistically poorer, for since its foundation in 1964, this world-beating ensemble has commissioned 160 new works, including major ones by Elliot Carter, Harrison Birtwistle, Mark-Anthony Turnage, plus a catalogue of other now-prominent composers.

Navarra Quartet, Wigmore Hall

Beethoven’s deafness was a noisy affair, with his dying hearing-sensors sending dreadfully garbled messages to his brain, but you’d never know it from the magisterial poise of the music he went on writing.

Album: Blow, Venus and Adonis &ndash; Theatre of the Ayre / Kenny (Wigmore Hall Live)

Long overshadowed by Dido and Aeneas, John Blow's Venus and Adonis beguiles in this witty, sensual performance under lutenist Elizabeth Kenny.

Radio 3 - 'Every listener won't like every editorial decision'

Independent readers have been critical of Radio 3's treatment of Mozart and Handel. Its controller, Roger Wright, answers them and outlines his plans for live broadcasts

Aldeburgh Festival - A classical treat if you pay enough

Members increasingly get first shout for tickets at events such as the Aldeburgh Festival. Join or prepare to queue for returns, says Jessica Duchen, although the organisations rely on public money

Album: Handel, Il trionfo del Tempo...&ndash; Early Opera Company/Curnyn (Wigmore Hall Live)

Composed in 1707, "Il trionfo..." is musical prosecco.

Magdalena Kozena, Wigmore Hall

After releasing a Cd of Italian love songs from the early seventeenth century, Magdalena Kozena and the Private Musicke ensemble are touring a programme based on it. ‘Lettera amorosa’ is the name of a song by Monteverdi, but in plural form it makes the perfect title for this collection of songs by his less familiar (to us) contemporaries. Given that the songs of Sigismondo D’India, Giulio Caccini, Barbara Strozzi, and Tarquinio Merula are superb, it makes good sense for Kozena to bring them back into focus.

Kotaro Fukuma, Wigmore Hall

The guru-principle holds good in Western classical music as it does in the music of the East. Kotaro Fukuma’s programme-note suggests he’s collected a whole gallery of gurus: if he’s drawn the key element from each, he should have crossed Leon Fleischer’s Teutonic power with Aldo Ciccolini’s Italian finesse, and Richard Goode’s serene classicism with Maria Joao Pires’s bold Romanticism; Mitsuko Uchida’s fastidious intensity with Leslie Howard’s virtuosity.

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In a world of Saudi bullying, right-wing Israeli ministers and the twilight of Obama, Iran is looking like a possible policeman of the Gulf

Iran is shifting from pariah to possible future policeman of the Gulf

Robert Fisk on our crisis with Iran
The young are the new poor: A third of young people pushed into poverty

The young are the new poor

Sharp increase in the number of under-25s living in poverty
Greens on the march: ‘We could be on the edge of something very big’

Greens on the march

‘We could be on the edge of something very big’
Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby - through the stories of his accusers

Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby

Through the stories of his accusers
Why are words like 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?

The Meaning of Mongol

Why are the words 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible