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One of that select band of British pianists to achieve international recognition, Bernard Roberts was in constant demand as a recitalist, chamber musician, accompanist, concerto soloist and teacher. He was acclaimed by audiences and critics, the remarkable breadth of his industry bringing greater recognition for the instrument itself and proving pivotal in inspiring generations of aspiring performers.

The cellist who wants to shake up London with a classical mystery tour

The South Bank Centre's new artist-in-residence aims to fill every corner of the venue with new music, he tells Jessica Duchen

Konstantin Soukhovetski, Wigmore Hall

The way Radio 3 foists the music of Percy Grainger on its listeners is a perennial mystery, given that its choice invariably focuses on his most irritatingly breezy mode.

Sophie Bevan: Born to sing

Fast-rising soprano Sophie Bevan comes from a family of eight musical children and an extended musical family of 60. Ahead of her landmark solo recital tonight, she talks to Jessica Duchen

Mozart Unwrapped, OAE/Bevan/Bezuidenhout/Cohen, Kings Place

Having just praised the Wigmore Hall for bravely flying the flag during most schedulers’ dead-time at Christmas, I must now give a similar accolade to London’s new chamber venue in the wilds of Kings Cross – Kings Place.

Bertrand Chamayou, Wigmore Hall

With the horizon echoing to carols by candlelight, and with the Gubbayfication of the Albert Hall and Barbican, this is the time of year when one gives thanks for the Wigmore Hall, where there is no falling-off in musical quality.

Virginia Ironside: There is nothing sacred about dead bodies. So put them to use

It's long overdue that we introduced 'presumed consent' in this country. But a pagan pre-occupation with body parts holds us back

Beloved Clara, Parham/Drake/Jarvis, Wigmore Hall

As a tale of love conquering all, then being conquered in turn by madness, and with the incursion of a third party to form the most chaste love-triangle in history, the saga of Robert Schumann, Clara Wieck, and Johannes Brahms is uniquely fertile soil for drama.

Fables: A Film Opera, Spitalfields Winter Festival, London <br/> The Messiah, Wigmore Hall, London

Stories of survival, rebellion, greed and love come to life in a remarkable marriage of music and film

OAE/Trinity Choir/Layton, St John&rsquo;s Smith Square

With much-loved classics, familiarity can breed such content that we become blind to their strangenesses.

Album: Alina Ibragimova, Cedric Tiberghien, Beethoven Violin Sonatas &ndash; 2 (Wigmore Hall Live)

The second volume in Alina Ibragimova and Cédric Tiberghien's ongoing series of Beethoven violin sonatas sustains the standard of the first, with their treatment of the Violin Sonata in F major, Spring, Op 24, perhaps their most delightful vehicle yet.

Piau/Rousset/Talens Lyriques, Wigmore Hall

This was a concert of which one had high hopes. The French soprano Sandrine Piau – a renowned Baroque exponent – would sing Purcell’s sacred songs accompanied by harpsichordist Christophe Rousset and his distinguished Talens Lyriques colleagues, Elizabeth Kenny on the lute and Laurence Dreyfus on the viola da gamba.

Risor Festival of Chamber Music, Wigmore Hall, London

Each year, Risor - a small fishing town on the south-eastern coast of Norway - hosts an internationally renowned festival of chamber music.

Steven Isserlis, Viviane Hagner, Jean-Efflam Bavouzet, Wigmore Hall, London

Moments of perfection are rare, but you know one when you find it. In the opening concert of cellist Steven Isserlis's Saint-Saëns, Fauré and Ravel series, it was the quietest, most modest piece that stopped the breath. Who would have thought that Fauré's little Berceuse could house that much magic? Isserlis, cradling his muted cello, made it speak with an ineffable fusion of beauty, truth and love. I reckon Fauré himself would have been moved to tears.

The complex harmonies of a classical triad

The lives of Fauré, Saint-Saëns andRavel were heavily intertwined and interdependent. Jessica Duchen reveals how the three composers were key to each other's success
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